Ford Focus ST Forum banner
1 - 20 of 50 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is your go to cleaning products.. ?
for washing .. the Chemical Guys Car Wash Soap is awesome. and smells awesome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I would have to say that my favorite car cleaning tool would be my wheel woolies! Product wise, I love using Ceramic Pro Sport on Ceramic Coated vehicles!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
I would have to say that my favorite car cleaning tool would be my wheel woolies! Product wise, I love using Ceramic Pro Sport on Ceramic Coated vehicles!
Is the ceramic pro sport something you use on your ST? I like the looks of it since it hydrophobic, I love using rain-x on my windows. It would be awesome if my whole vehicle was like that. Also, where do you buy it?
 

·
Registered
2016 Kona Blue ST3
Joined
·
526 Posts
So far, my favorites have been Chemical Guys Hybrid V07 detailer and Eagle One A2Z wheel cleaner.

Although, I'm swapping them out this year for CarPro Reload and Iron X respectively. Figure they'll be a better match for my ceramic coating.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
174 Posts
In no particular order

Quick detailer and car drier spray - Optimum No Rinse Wash and Wax
Wheel Cleaner - Sonax Full Effect
Car Wash - I also like Chemical Guys (mr pink or citrus wash and gloss)
Interior Cleaner - 303 Aerospace and a swiffer
Ceramic Coating - Pinnacle Black Label Diamond Coating
Ceramic Repair - Carpro Essence Plus
All in One - Optimum Poli Seal
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,763 Posts
Dawn dish soap. I'm dead serious. And an occasional wax with whatever's on sale.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Is the ceramic pro sport something you use on your ST? I like the looks of it since it hydrophobic, I love using rain-x on my windows. It would be awesome if my whole vehicle was like that. Also, where do you buy it?
Hey @ScottyT - to answer your question, yes, it is something I use on my vehicle. Ceramic Pro Sport is designed to work in two fashions, as a stand alone application, or to be layered on top of Ceramic Pro 9H/Light in order to "rejuvenate" it. Much like CQuartz has "Reload", CP has sport. CP Sport is something that can be sold to a consumer, you do not need to be a CP Certified Tech in order to buy or apply it. However, you need to contact a Certified Tech in order to buy it off of them, or a distributor in your area.

For actually applying it, there are certain steps required to install it correctly. If done incorrectly, it will leave streaks on the car known as high spots. As a tech myself, something I find my shop correcting for clients is there own application of CP Sport. People treat it like a Quick Detailer, and spray it directly on panels of there vehicle, and if not wiped down properly, the actual "spray" mark will remain. The principle behind it is to apply it while the vehicle is wet to slow down the flash or drying time of the product. You take a wet microfiber towel, wring it out, fold it in a square, spray a few squirts of CP Sport on the MF towel, and wipe down the panel, move to the next, and on to the next. Simple to install using this technique. One bottle can coat anywhere between 6-9 vehicles. If the car is coated in CP 9H or light, you should only use the product once every 12 months, or 6 depending how much you like to pamper the vehicle! So a bottle will last you a while. If the car is not already coated, Once every 2-3 Months will give you an adequate amount of coating. Again, these are just suggestions, depending on how much you wash your car or the terrain you live on, these suggestions will be different.

If you are interested in purchasing it I can contact a technician in your area and give you their coordinates to purchase the product.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
So far, my favorites have been Chemical Guys Hybrid V07 detailer and Eagle One A2Z wheel cleaner.

Although, I'm swapping them out this year for CarPro Reload and Iron X respectively. Figure they'll be a better match for my ceramic coating.
Hey @mazui - Reload and Iron X are great products. What Ceramic Coating is currently on your vehicle? Usually whatever coating you have purchased will have a rejuvenation product (such as reload) that is designed to work with your brand of coating. Certain coatings can become too hydrophobic for a quick wax, quick detailer, or a rejuvenation product (not specifically designed for that coating) to actually adhere to the current coating. It could end up costing you more money in the end. A client tried to add (I believe if I am not mistaken) an OTS rejuvenation spray to his Gyeon Coated car and the product was literally beading off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
If you are interested in purchasing it I can contact a technician in your area and give you their coordinates to purchase the product.
Yeah that'd be great! Unless you have any other suggestions for a product that kind of "waterproofs" the body similar to how rain-x does windows?? Maybe something that is easier to obtain and cheaper, I suspect the CP Sport would be fairly expensive? Thanks for the info!
 

·
Super Moderator
2017 Ford Fusion Sport
Joined
·
8,200 Posts
You really can't be serious...Dawn is considered an abrasive dish soap and also will strip any wax or protectant you have on there and will dull the finish...
You'd be surprised how many people wash with Dawn because it removes grime and stuff so well.


It also removes your paint's protectant at the same time. It isn't a "detailing" product, it's one that my mother uses because she doesn't care about perfectly preserving her paint on her Escape lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Yeah that'd be great! Unless you have any other suggestions for a product that kind of "waterproofs" the body similar to how rain-x does windows?? Maybe something that is easier to obtain and cheaper, I suspect the CP Sport would be fairly expensive? Thanks for the info!
A distributor sells the product for 89.99 Canadian.

Other options within a budget:

A 500 ML bottle of Car Pro Reload will retail around 45-49$ Canadian which does the job quite nicely. Effects will last 1-2 months if the car is not coated in Cquartz.

There is Car Pro Hydro2Lite that goes for around 35$ Canadian. This product usually lasts between washes, a few squirts is all you need. Alternatively, there is the Touchless Silica additive that you can add in your soap mixture which makes application a breeze - it will cost you significantly more

Nanoskin Ceramic Nano Sealant (which is applied like a sealant) (a small 4Oz bottle will cost you around 50$) (It's a good product, more on the expensive side for the amount you get)

AMMO Reflex + Ammo Skin combination which is a very good kit - Reflex will coat around 3 cars (even though it indicates 6 cars), and Skin will pretty much last you a life time because of how much product he put in the bottle.

Going on the wax sides...

there is collonite 845 insulator wax which is a gem of a wax on it's own. $24 Canadian.

marque d'elegance (my personal favorite in the collonite line up) $49 Canadian

And WaxAddicts Quartz wax which has become a wax of choice if a client wants to go with a Wax for sealing as opposed to a coating. It goes for around 160$ Canadian. This product will last you a good while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
A distributor sells the product for 89.99 Canadian.

Other options within a budget:

A 500 ML bottle of Car Pro Reload will retail around 45-49$ Canadian which does the job quite nicely. Effects will last 1-2 months if the car is not coated in Cquartz.

There is Car Pro Hydro2Lite that goes for around 35$ Canadian. This product usually lasts between washes, a few squirts is all you need. Alternatively, there is the Touchless Silica additive that you can add in your soap mixture which makes application a breeze - it will cost you significantly more

Nanoskin Ceramic Nano Sealant (which is applied like a sealant) (a small 4Oz bottle will cost you around 50$) (It's a good product, more on the expensive side for the amount you get)

AMMO Reflex + Ammo Skin combination which is a very good kit - Reflex will coat around 3 cars (even though it indicates 6 cars), and Skin will pretty much last you a life time because of how much product he put in the bottle.

Going on the wax sides...

there is collonite 845 insulator wax which is a gem of a wax on it's own. $24 Canadian.

marque d'elegance (my personal favorite in the collonite line up) $49 Canadian

And WaxAddicts Quartz wax which has become a wax of choice if a client wants to go with a Wax for sealing as opposed to a coating. It goes for around 160$ Canadian. This product will last you a good while.
Thank you for the options! I guess I'll be doing some research this weekend
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,055 Posts
You really can't be serious...Dawn is considered an abrasive dish soap and also will strip any wax or protectant you have on there and will dull the finish...
Dont they clean birds with oil all over them with it?
 

·
Super Moderator
2017 Ford Fusion Sport
Joined
·
8,200 Posts
Dont they clean birds with oil all over them with it?
Yup. It is naturally a degreaser. It does good at removing chemicals, hence why you use it on baked on and greasy dishes. It naturally is designed to fuse with then separate oil and grime from whatever you're cleaning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,763 Posts
You really can't be serious...Dawn is considered an abrasive dish soap and also will strip any wax or protectant you have on there and will dull the finish...
It's amazing how many people think this is true! I've not used anything else on my car and the water still beads up. It's not a chemical stripper folks, it's just a soap. Soap is soap, and any soap will lift the dirt when you wash your car and keep it from scratching the paint. No, It doesn't strip anything off the finish. Just dirt.
For your edification, from Dish soaps and car wash products use the same surfactant packages.
Dish wash soaps are designed to remove organic residue and germs from plates, not rinse road grime and dirt from a car. Dish soap might be a little hash to use frequently to wash your car. Once a yea won't hurt anything.
Perhaps I should dispel this myth. I'm an R&D Chemist that designs cleaning chemicals (generally for the Food and Beverage industries, but have also made instrument sanitisers for hospitals, etc). I'm an avid car enthusiast also and have been looking into the car wash topic for some time now. It seems to me that a lot of marketing BS is getting propagated as fact, even on this forum. THIS I'm not criticising at all, as you aren't chemists and have no other way of knowing besides what a marketing team put on their labels. I have, however, gotten annoyed with the marketing BS out there and thought I'd tear some of it down to better enlighten you all.

Dish soaps and car wash products use the same surfactant packages. Commonly, SLES (Sodium Lauryl Ether Sulphate), Dodecylbenzene sulphonic acid (neutralised with Sodium Hydroxide, Triethanolamine or Isopropanolamine). You'll find concentrations will vary, but not by much. There will be other additives that make a slight difference - but a couple of percent difference in the bottle become negligible once you pour a capful into a bucket and dilute it that far.
Am I saying dish soaps and car wash products are exactly the same?
No. They'll use different dyes and fragrances. Potentially some silicone emulsions or waxes for an increased shine. Maybe some optical brighteners too. With regards to the actual surfactants that do the cleaning - they'll be the same. And the salt...
My initial thought on the difference between sink detergents and car wash products was this: I know EVERYONE puts salt into their sink detergents - it bumps at the viscosity and makes it easier to work with (also makes them cheaper too). Car wash products won't use salt. (as it drastically increases corrosion rates)
Sadly, this isn't true. A simple silver nitrate titration confirmed it (but I don't want to go into detail about company names, needless to say that I started with 5 different products from a local auto store and now I've tested over 20 based on the shocking results, even from 'boutique' products). Even with some products that claimed to include "corrosion inhibitors." I hate to say it, but loading up with salt negates any inhibitor you add to the product.

There is no such thing as a 'harsh' surfactant or a 'soft' one (unless we're talking skin-care, but our skin is infinitely more sensitive than the polymeric clear coat on your car). They have slightly different effects but all work on the same principle. "Harsh detergent" is marketing BS. No detergent is going to dissolve your acrylic clear coat (the chemist that sits next to me worked for BASF in their automotive paints division for 10 years, he's now been with us designing industrial rust-proof paints for another 10 - he had a very good laugh when I showed him some of the stuff written online regarding this topic). You know what causes much more damage than a "harsh surfactant" to your clear coat? UV Degradation. Paint laboratories world-wide use a UV chamber to try to destroy their paints (so they can prove how long they last) - what they don't do is soak the paint samples in sink detergent.

In saying all this, I know that there are SOME quality manufacturers out there that don't use salt. A general rule of thumb will be to look for the companies that charge good $ for a product but don't seem to have the fancy packaging to match the price tag. That fancy packaging and labelling costs more than the chemical in the bottle.

If you have any specific questions about surfactants, surface tension, dirt removal, corrosion etc feel free to ask. I'm trying not to turn this into a chemistry lesson (as even I find that boring!) yet I'm happy to go into detail should someone require it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
@RoachRage - hey Roach, I found your post to be incredibly informative and it was a good read. I hope other members will take the time and read it as well. Here is a question based on my experience and understanding, and correct me if I am wrong (which may be the case as I cannot claim to be a chemist) - my fundamental understanding (removing any marketing strategies that push that certain car soaps are PH Neutral or Balanced), is as follows: wouldn't the concentration of a dish soap compared to a car soap be drastically different in regards to their respectful purpose, allowing one to act more as a car soap and one as a surface degreaser?

To use random numbers - let us say that in CAR SOAP "A", the directions state to use 1 Capful of their product for every gallon of water - Standard buckets are 5 gallons, and the common person will use approx. 3-4 Gallons of water with 3-4 capfuls of soap. Using more than the recommended amount will lead the soap to be of higher concentration, which can then make Car Soap "A" act more as a degreaser and be used to help remove excess compound or polish residues, waxes, and even certain sealants (key phrase here is "certain", because as waxes and sealants advance and use more synthetic additives, including but not limited to Silicon Dioxide which is the main characteristic of a coating, they cannot all be removed with car wash soap, dish soap, IPA wipe, etc)

Same statement again as above for CAR SOAP "B" - we are now using 3-4 gallons of water with 3-4 capfuls of DISH soap. Would this soap not be of a higher concentration than car soap A, and act more of a degreaser - reason being the dish soap is moreover designed to remove grim and grease? What is your thought on this?

Now after reading your statement, while at my shop, I decided to take 2 dishes out of my dishwasher, that had caked on chocolate from a Microwaveable Lava Cake from the prior day. Using a thimble full of car soap and 1/4 Cup of water, I poured it onto 1 of the two dishes. I repeated the same experiment with my hand soap, an Orange Scented Palm Olive soap, and did the same thing in the other dish. Within 5 minutes, when I went to scrub, the dish with the Dish Soap washed off the majority of the chocolate without needing some extra scrubbing, whereas the car soap one did in fact remove near the same amount, but required me to give a quick "one two" scrub. Based off of what I saw, and what I have written above, the fundamental misconception occurs when one mixture becomes more concentrated than the other. If for 4 gallons of water, I used 1-2 capful of dish soap, I do in fact believe that the results would be the same, and that both soaps would work equally as well without stripping away any waxes or sealants on the car. I do believe however, that if for the 4 gallons of water, I used 4-5 capfuls of dishsoap, then I would get into this area of degreasing, to strip away any waxes on the vehicle. I also believe that the enthusiast that uses dish soap pours their soap in "free for all" style and squeezes the bottle until they get the satisfying feeling of "yes, that should be enough", leading to a much higher concentration than required for the job at hand. Less is more when using dish soap - would this statement be correct from your chemical understanding?

Now I 100% agree with your statement that Dish Soap will not actually damage your clear coat - it would be quite incorrect to market that notion, especially when some of the top detailers/youtubers in the world express the importance of using dish soap when stripping away a wax from your car - it would not be cost effective to use more of Product A to get the same results using half of the amount of Product Dawn Degreaser.

The "faded" clearcoat or the "faded" plastic trim pieces that look dull after being degreased... Well let's think of it in this manner - if your car has a bunch of swirls or scratches, and you fill them up (probably the incorrect term for this idea, but lets go with it) with a glaze or a wax, your car will still have a nice wet look to it and will not look as dull as it would without the products added. Next thing you know, you degreased the car, strip away the protection you layered on, and now the car looks dull - all you did was bring out the face of the car after washing away the make up - no sweat, contact your nearest detailer and get her looking sharp again. And as for the plastics, well, chances are you have dressed your plastics in an OTS product, perhaps Mothers Back2Black? - and you have simply stripped off the dressing - you did not degrade or damage anything, you just degreased it. Simple as that.

Anyways, again, I really enjoyed reading your post, and I hope that all of this well help clear up the theory that dish soap will damage your clear coat.

A client of mine has once told me it is better to educate, not to hate. I believe this quote applies here.
 

·
Registered
2016 Kona Blue ST3
Joined
·
526 Posts
Hey @mazui - Reload and Iron X are great products. What Ceramic Coating is currently on your vehicle? Usually whatever coating you have purchased will have a rejuvenation product (such as reload) that is designed to work with your brand of coating. Certain coatings can become too hydrophobic for a quick wax, quick detailer, or a rejuvenation product (not specifically designed for that coating) to actually adhere to the current coating. It could end up costing you more money in the end. A client tried to add (I believe if I am not mistaken) an OTS rejuvenation spray to his Gyeon Coated car and the product was literally beading off.
The car is coated with CQuartz currently. I did see that some coatings don't play well with rejuvenation products from other brands, so Reload (and Iron X) was the obvious choice.
 
1 - 20 of 50 Posts
Top