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Didn't know those were turbo, interesting.

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They came with either a 1.4 turbo (with a whopping 139 crank hp) or a 1.8 n/a daewoo engine. Part of what makes it so slow is it stops making power at 5500 but shifts at 6500. So on the highway its embarrassing . Hoping itll make 200 wheel hp (93 pump) after the larger turbo, although ive only seen numbers of the version 3 turbo on ethanol.
 
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Just proves she's a Joni Mitchell fan...
"I've looked at life from both sides now"
 

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Had a few minutes so I decided to check the ground point off the battery and the one under the air box to see if they are in fact painted. Yes, Yes they were, so there was no clean contact between the tab and body. No longer! A little buff with some 100 grit, a blast of contact cleaner, and a liberal coat of Stabilant 22 and all's right with the world!
I decided to throw the trickle charger on for the night and bump up the battery as it was reading 11.5 V, which to me is low. I'm wondering if there are charging issues due to the **** grounds on the ST....
 

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2016 ST2, Absolute Black, Turbosmart BPV, Dual OCCs, Innovative RMM, JBR Intake & SS Arm, 245/40R18
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Had a few minutes so I decided to check the ground point off the battery and the one under the air box to see if they are in fact painted. Yes, Yes they were, so there was no clean contact between the tab and body. No longer! A little buff with some 100 grit, a blast of contact cleaner, and a liberal coat of Stabilant 22 and all's right with the world!
I decided to throw the trickle charger on for the night and bump up the battery as it was reading 11.5 V, which to me is low. I'm wondering if there are charging issues due to the **** grounds on the ST....
Interesting, that stabilant sounds like good stuff, especially for low level connecters and communications stuff. I suppose an improvement over silicone contact grease.

Low voltage electrical equipment often uses good synthetic grease on both sliding and fixed bolted power connections on things like breakers and bus with plated or bare copper. I've seen Mobil SHC grades spec'd.

I've always been a little nervous removing paint from steel, tho. A good coating is essential for lasting results.
 

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Interesting, that stabilant sounds like good stuff, especially for low level connecters and communications stuff. I suppose an improvement over silicone contact grease.

Low voltage electrical equipment often uses good synthetic grease on both sliding and fixed bolted power connections on things like breakers and bus with plated or bare copper. I've seen Mobil SHC grades spec'd.

I've always been a little nervous removing paint from steel, tho. A good coating is essential for lasting results.
It was designed to be used at every electrical connection for fighter jets. Which is why it's so crazy expensive. Not entirely sure what the chemistry is, but i own a bottle and use it only in problem areas.
 
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Pulled my TB bar out of the car.
Er, uhm, why?

I mean, I know why I got mine mostly installed and then changed my mind because I didn't want to lose part or all of the lower cowl, but what have you got in store to prompt you to pull yours out?
 

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After a ton of self inflicted challenges in my brain I pulled the trigger on a set of Niche Misano’s for the Black ST, I’m going to transfer those Snowflakes to the 3. I’ve grown to hate those silver Snowflakes so badly on that one. The wrap for the hood on that one is hopefully close to being done, I hope to have some pics this weekend so I can seal that deal.
 

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I do have some strange preferences, but I never liked the snowflakes much.
 

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I do have some strange preferences, but I never liked the snowflakes much.
There are certain vehicles you just DON’T change wheels on... IE, any Corvette, old Mustang Chevelle’s or Camaro’s. I get the resto mod thing but it kills the nostalgia, drag or circle track cars can’t use OEM wheels. I don’t mind the Snowflakes but prefer the darker grey that’s on my newer ST1, now is that I have 2 ST’s in the stable the #3 car looks tacky with the silver Snowflake’s. That bright orange against the silver..... So that one will get the darker wheels, my ST1 will get the new ones.
 

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Interesting, that stabilant sounds like good stuff, especially for low level connecters and communications stuff. I suppose an improvement over silicone contact grease.

Low voltage electrical equipment often uses good synthetic grease on both sliding and fixed bolted power connections on things like breakers and bus with plated or bare copper. I've seen Mobil SHC grades spec'd.

I've always been a little nervous removing paint from steel, tho. A good coating is essential for lasting results.
It's amazing. I have a Carver pre-amp built in 87 that I used it on along with MG Chem Nu-Control to clean out the pots that were very scratchy. Sounds like new now! As @TurboGT says, it's pricy but a little goes a looong way. I've put it in the fuse box connector as well to preclude any problems.
 

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It's amazing. I have a Carver pre-amp built in 87 that I used it on along with MG Chem Nu-Control to clean out the pots that were very scratchy. Sounds like new now! As @TurboGT says, it's pricy but a little goes a looong way. I've put it in the fuse box connector as well to preclude any problems.
Gonna have to get me some of that stuff. Scratchy pots are no fun.
 

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Interesting, that stabilant sounds like good stuff, especially for low level connecters and communications stuff. I suppose an improvement over silicone contact grease.

Low voltage electrical equipment often uses good synthetic grease on both sliding and fixed bolted power connections on things like breakers and bus with plated or bare copper. I've seen Mobil SHC grades spec'd.

I've always been a little nervous removing paint from steel, tho. A good coating is essential for lasting results.
Dielectric grease.... =death to electronics. I’ve been a tech working for the Caterpillar realm for almost 30 years now. They put out a publication way back then to NEVER use that stuff on any connection. Years are passing as well as the old ways of thinking for electrical connections, as have the connectors have improved to almost bullet proof. I’ve seen 100’s of thousands of dollars wasted because some old dude pulled a trans or engine and caused a short across a CAN-A,B,C wiping out ECM’s reassembling systems. One instance last year was almost 30K deep in labor and parts to get it undone.
I’d be interested to see what this product is, if it’s FAA worthy I’d bet it’s good but sounds expensive.
I’d rather see someone buff a ground all day long, all communications rely on that clear path.
Please people do not use dielectric grease in your connections, keep them clean and dry. If there’s a burned pin or socket replace all pins and sockets in the connector, as well as the connections themselves, they will have new seals.
 

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I've yet to see a properly greased auto connection fail, but I have seen plenty of dry corroded ones fail, and leaky connector seals.
Then there's fretting wear too that grease helps, but connectors have gotten a lot better now as you say.

Computers and inside black boxes warrant extra care. I suppose you are mainly referring to ECU and PCM connectors with lots of dense, small pins?
 

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I've yet to see a properly greased auto connection fail, but I have seen plenty of dry corroded ones fail, and leaky connector seals.
Then there's fretting wear too that grease helps, but connectors have gotten a lot better now as you say.

Computers and inside black boxes warrant extra care. I suppose you are mainly referring to ECU and PCM connectors with lots of dense, small pins?
The more I think about what I said there I knew I’d draw attention or controversy, and I apologize to those that are new and old to wiring. My reference is to Dielectric grease, and to my detriment as far as vehicles are concerned I live in Arizona where it never rains. But for arguments sake, and it has been proven over the course of my profession throughout the vintages of connections nothing is to be put in there.
My product line is expected to run shift 24/7 365 in the desert, Arctic, under water, salt water and in sulfuric acid dumps, everything. Connections are rarely a failure, it’s usually a wire rub or fatigue. They are to be kept clean and dry and gold plated. FAA may require something other and I appreciate that, mine won’t fall out of the air.
My fight is for that CRAP little blister pack of grease from the Auto Zone or CSK.
 

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Grease can be nearly as opinionated as motor and gear oil, no offense taken. :giggle: :D

If you have expensive equipment and high quality sealed connectors with the gold plating, I could understand better field experiences without grease.

Then there's the rest of the world with cheap connectors that may not meet spec and have quality issues, where grease often helps.

Some big dont's I've seen:
1) Don't use silicone grease near arcing contacts, like in many switches. Dielectric grease is usually silicone.

2) Don't try to use conductive grease with graphite or metal particles thinking it will make a better electrical connection.The conductive particles can instead cause tracking and damage in a multipin connector.

3) Too much grease can be just as bad as none, especially on connectors regularly plugged and unplugged if it attracts and retains dirt in the connection.
A little dab will do ya.

This is one company with good products for a variety of connectors and equipment in different operating conditions I would trust that had good advice the last I looked, which has been awhile:
Nye Lubricants
Electrical Components
 

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Grease can be nearly as opinionated as motor and gear oil, no offense taken. :giggle: :D

If you have expensive equipment and high quality sealed connectors with the gold plating, I could understand better field experiences without grease.

Then there's the rest of the world with cheap connectors that may not meet spec and have quality issues, where grease often helps.

Some big dont's I've seen:
1) Don't use silicone grease near arcing contacts, like in many switches. Dielectric grease is usually silicone.

2) Don't try to use conductive grease with graphite or metal particles thinking it will make a better electrical connection.The conductive particles can instead cause tracking and damage in a multipin connector.

3) Too much grease can be just as bad as none, especially on connectors regularly plugged and unplugged if it attracts and retains dirt in the connection.
A little dab will do ya.

This is one company with good products for a variety of connectors and equipment in different operating conditions I would trust that had good advice the last I looked, which has been awhile:
Nye Lubricants
Electrical Components
Perfectly said ;)
 
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