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How's it going guys,
So I'm looking to go to my first track day JUST to get some experience and enjoy what the car can really put down. My concern for this is just mods, The only mod I have is an IC 3.5 from Depo. Stock wheels, tires, and suspension. I am running stage 2 Cobb OTS. Is there anything else I MUST upgrade before going? I'm worried about temps pretty much, but what else should I look out for?

Thanks guys!


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How's it going guys,
So I'm looking to go to my first track day JUST to get some experience and enjoy what the car can really put down. My concern for this is just mods, The only mod I have is an IC 3.5 from Depo. Stock wheels, tires, and suspension. I am running stage 2 Cobb OTS. Is there anything else I MUST upgrade before going? I'm worried about temps pretty much, but what else should I look out for?

Thanks guys!


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if you are running stock brake pads and rotors I suggest getting track ready pads and new blanks so after your session you can slap the stock pads and the new rotors on the car, locally I see a lot of people do oil coolers although I'm not aware of this car having cooling issues it certainly wont hurt to have it before the track day

when you go to the track I suggest bringing oil and a new filter as well so you can change your oil after you're done
 

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For your first track day the only thing I would worry about is a intercooler, since you have that I'd just watch oil temps and have fun. Yes brakes and all could help. But you won't be any where fast enough to worry about those things.. no matter how fast you may think you are, once you get to a track you find out real quick your not fast lol. Also, after your first session learning the track, ride with someone fast. My first track day I started having a little brake fade during the first session, the lead follow learn session. Was like no way you could go any faster.. Then I rode with the fast guys and found out I was riding the brake to long and not hard enough. I knocked 10 seconds off my lap time, still 15-20 seconds off the record lap the car did with randy pobst.. so don't worry about anything other then having a good time and learning the dynamics of your car
 

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Awesome! You'll have lots of fun! The car is plenty capable in its stock form. Only thing I recommend would be brake pads and upgraded brake fluid. More specifically I'd recommend Hawk HP+ pads and Motul RBF 600. But you may be fine on your stock pads and fluid as I've heard some others have done that without issue, though once you're hooked and get faster it will be something you'll most likely want to upgrade. And of course improving your driving skills will always have bigger effect on lowering your lap times than any modification to the car.

What track are you planning on going to and with which organization?
 

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- You DO NOT need upgraded brake pads or rotors - BECAUSE you are no where near pro levels/at a respectable level in your FIRST track day
- You definitely need a higher temp brake fluid like SUPER ATE TYP 200, Motul RBF 600 or Torque 700
- your stock suspension and tires are fine
- you already have an aftermarket IC which is required
- If you see your oil temps go above normal - just put heater to full hot and you will be fine
- I have tracked my 2 FoST's on stock rotors and pafs with Super ATE TYP 200 brake fluid and CX Racing FMIC - and everything was normal
- ask your instructor if you can sit with him in one of the session, or better yet and if you are comfortable with it - let him drive your car for 1 outing so you get familiarized and comfortable with the line and track etiquette
- other than that - in-between session walk around, talk to people, make friends, be humble and always have an open mind to learn and adjust to stuff - and you will be all right!
- once you come in after each session check your tire pressure and adjust them - as the tires build up heat when on track the pressures rise. I normally deflate the tires a few PSi - else once the pressures rise the car starts to feel floaty and not grounded!

Hope this helps - Best of luck!
 
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if you are running stock brake pads and rotors I suggest getting track ready pads and new blanks so after your session you can slap the stock pads and the new rotors on the car, locally I see a lot of people do oil coolers although I'm not aware of this car having cooling issues it certainly wont hurt to have it before the track day

when you go to the track I suggest bringing oil and a new filter as well so you can change your oil after you're done
Changing oil after just one track day - waste of money and effort, especially if running synthetic. I had 2 track days and ran on the same oil for a total of 6000 miles, then sent the sample to Blackstone. It passed with flying colors. They said I could have easily run another 1-2K miles on it.

One more note on overheating - if you start hitting the limp mode you might want to consider flashing back to stock tune. A little less power, but should reduce the temp some.
 

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- You DO NOT need upgraded brake pads or rotors - BECAUSE you are no where near pro levels/at a respectable level in your FIRST track day
- You definitely need a higher temp brake fluid like SUPER ATE TYP 200, Motul RBF 600 or Torque 700
- your stock suspension and tires are fine
- you already have an aftermarket IC which is required
- If you see your oil temps go above normal - just put heater to full hot and you will be fine
- I have tracked my 2 FoST's on stock rotors and pafs with Super ATE TYP 200 brake fluid and CX Racing FMIC - and everything was normal
- ask your instructor if you can sit with him in one of the session, or better yet and if you are comfortable with it - let him drive your car for 1 outing so you get familiarized and comfortable with the line and track etiquette
- other than that - in-between session walk around, talk to people, make friends, be humble and always have an open mind to learn and adjust to stuff - and you will be all right!
- once you come in after each session check your tire pressure and adjust them - as the tires build up heat when on track the pressures rise. I normally deflate the tires a few PSi - else once the pressures rise the car starts to feel floaty and not grounded!

Hope this helps - Best of luck!
I like these recommendations although I WOULD upgrade to better pads. I have seen stock pads crown which can get dangerous. Brake fluid is the only absolute must or you won't have to worry about brake fade because they will be gone!
 

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been to two track days in my 100% stock car. 35k and still 100% stock... I did change the shift knob... that counts right?

I change the oil every 5-6k, even if I do a track day anywhere in that range. I have NEVER checked the oil on this car and every time I dump out 6qts and dump 6qts back in (I do run a oversized filter) insane to spend money on perfectly good oil to poor perfectly good oil down the drain and if I change at 5k I even feel that way.

All this blah blah blah about have to have this and have to do that? you DO NOT! stock intercooler is just fine on the factory setup, both my track days were over 90F and never went to limp mode. car never got over normal operating temps.

Surely if you are "racing" and wanting to win or you are running your car in that manner then yes you might need a few upgrades. but I am just an avg joe playing on the track and I normally do plenty of passing so Im long ways from the slowest guy out there

Go and have fun!
 

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I agree with nickbaldwin86. Two track days and 4 or 5 autocross events and I've been fine on brakes and everything else. Only mod is the FRPP tune and intake. Car inspected in December and stock brakes are still >50%. Full disclosure: I've less than 11k miles and I'm NOT aggressive on the streets at all, and I was cautious on track at the turns. You'll be fine on the track your first time out.
 

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I would agree, especially since it will be your first track day.
Chances are the the first session will just be a recon one where you can get familiarized with the track layout. At time goes on, you'll pick up speed but nothing too drastic.
Just make sure to keep your ego in check and listen to the instructor if you have one. Speed will come with experience, then you can start thinking of changing your brakes.

I would definitely get a ride from a coach (in his car) because sometimes, it can be an eye opener.
You'll undoubtedly have a ton of fun, so, enjoy!
 

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Changing oil after just one track day - waste of money and effort, especially if running synthetic. I had 2 track days and ran on the same oil for a total of 6000 miles, then sent the sample to Blackstone. It passed with flying colors. They said I could have easily run another 1-2K miles on it.

One more note on overheating - if you start hitting the limp mode you might want to consider flashing back to stock tune. A little less power, but should reduce the temp some.
I would rather be safe than sorry, it costs $25 for 5qts of German Castrol or German Mobil 1 at Walmart and a decent filter shouldn't cost more than $10, $35 and 20 mins isn't exactly a lot for a little bit of reassurance
 

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I just started doing track days a year ago and was really nervous as I didn't know what to expect. I found after my first few times out that I got more and more comfortable. After my first track day, my nerves were CONSIDERABLY reduced and made the whole day a lot more enjoyable.

A few things that I learned and made my time a lot more enjoyable are the following;

- DO NOT be afraid to ask questions, everyone is very friendly and would rather you ask stupid questions than risk safety while on the track
- Build up to your limits. Your first few laps are to be used to get everything up to temperature and get a feeling for everything. Stay out of everyones way and get comfortable
- Try not to chase people. It is super tempting to "keep up" but that is how 90% of accidents happen. Go your own speed.
- When a track veteran talks to you, listen

As for mechanical/essential needs, see below;

- Better brake pads help but aren't needed. You may want to go with Hawk HP+ minimum if you do decide to get pads. Hawk DTC-60 for front and HP+ for rear is a good set up if you want to upgrade.
- Brake cooling is important as our cars use the brakes for torque vectoring and it creates A LOT of heat. Velossa Tech makes a nice Stage 1 set up that is sufficient for people who don't go SUPER hard. They take all of 15 mins to install so you can take them off after if you wish.
- High temp brake fluid is absolutely needed. The worst/scariest thing is your brake pedal going to the floor after a long straight. Motul RBF600 is really good and I have never had an issue with mine.
- GOOD helmet. Buy the best helmet you can afford. Think of it this way, if you were barreling towards a wall, would you regret the extra couple hundred dollars you spent on your helmet?
- Notebook and pen. See below as to why.
- Gerry can with your choice of fuel. Some tracks have gas and some don't. Nothing worse than burning through all your gas and figuring out you have no gas!
- Chairs, water and shade. The track can get HOT and it is nice to relax and cool down. You get surprisingly tired after a long session.

Things that are good to keep an eye on are;

- Tire pressures. The heat generated from track driving will cause your tire pressures to jump from normal to almost 50psi sometimes. When I arrive I take my tire pressures and then take air out. This is a bit more advanced, but I usually let out 10psi and then come in after warm up and see where the temps are. Your preferences may vary, so just find a nice pressure and try to maintain it.
- Oil Temp, water temp and oil levels. Our cars get HOT. You want to stay safe and make sure you have proper lubrication at all time.

In the end, this is an experience that is to be used as a learning experience. The MOST important thing though, have FUN. It is a great time and it is easy to overwhelm yourself. Just focus on having fun and meeting new people.
 

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been to two track days in my 100% stock car. 35k and still 100% stock... I did change the shift knob... that counts right?

I change the oil every 5-6k, even if I do a track day anywhere in that range. I have NEVER checked the oil on this car and every time I dump out 6qts and dump 6qts back in (I do run a oversized filter) insane to spend money on perfectly good oil to poor perfectly good oil down the drain and if I change at 5k I even feel that way.

All this blah blah blah about have to have this and have to do that? you DO NOT! stock intercooler is just fine on the factory setup, both my track days were over 90F and never went to limp mode. car never got over normal operating temps.

Surely if you are "racing" and wanting to win or you are running your car in that manner then yes you might need a few upgrades. but I am just an avg joe playing on the track and I normally do plenty of passing so Im long ways from the slowest guy out there

Go and have fun!
About the oil change, the oil monitor system is really good right? Just follow that. (But For me it's been 11 months since oil change and 3500 miles, should I change it before track day?)

For brake fluid how's Pentosin for track use ? I changed to that a year ago. For stock brake pads is it enough for 2 days track day?

Manual says initial change for coolant is 6 years or 100k miles, I am at 4.5 years should I change it before track day or it's fine? 2014 FoST (It eats coolant I have to add a little bit 3 times the last 4.5 years.)

2 tires were patched up before, I think nails and tire pressure were fine no leaks etc. No problem for track day?

Everyone talked about prep beforeheand, how about afterwards? Maybe change out brake fluid if you were too hard on it etc, rotate tires etc?
 

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About the oil change, the oil monitor system is really good right? Just follow that. (But For me it's been 11 months since oil change and 3500 miles, should I change it before track day?)

For brake fluid how's Pentosin for track use ? I changed to that a year ago. For stock brake pads is it enough for 2 days track day?

Manual says initial change for coolant is 6 years or 100k miles, I am at 4.5 years should I change it before track day or it's fine? 2014 FoST (It eats coolant I have to add a little bit 3 times the last 4.5 years.)

2 tires were patched up before, I think nails and tire pressure were fine no leaks etc. No problem for track day?

Everyone talked about prep beforeheand, how about afterwards? Maybe change out brake fluid if you were too hard on it etc, rotate tires etc?
no reason to do an oil change before or after a track day, just silly, you can just change it at the next interval, If you track it weekly then that changes the interval completely. if you are using good oil it should NOT matter and a good oil will last with daily driving and a few track days in the mix.

I use Amsoils brake fluid, not the race stuff but just under that, and it has been a champ. Brake pads have life on them then run them, stock pads aren't great on the track but they do just fine, depends on how hard you are braking of course.

coolant is likely fine, if you over heat that might not even be the reason, I would just stick to the manual and cover it at 100k or 6 years.

I have heard of tires getting to hot and loosing plugs, i know people that will not plug their track tires, they replace if they get a flat and they also will NOT run them on the street just to keep them from getting nails. I assume you would really have to get the tires cooking on a hot day for this to happen so I am sure you will be fine and worst case... you loose a plug and have to go get it patched.

brake fluid should be changed out if you boil it at a track day. Brake fluid isnt that costly to take the chance and I would hate for my brakes to go out daily driving. would cost a LOT more than two bottles of fluid that is for sure
 

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no reason to do an oil change before or after a track day, just silly, you can just change it at the next interval, If you track it weekly then that changes the interval completely. if you are using good oil it should NOT matter and a good oil will last with daily driving and a few track days in the mix.

I use Amsoils brake fluid, not the race stuff but just under that, and it has been a champ. Brake pads have life on them then run them, stock pads aren't great on the track but they do just fine, depends on how hard you are braking of course.

coolant is likely fine, if you over heat that might not even be the reason, I would just stick to the manual and cover it at 100k or 6 years.

I have heard of tires getting to hot and loosing plugs, i know people that will not plug their track tires, they replace if they get a flat and they also will NOT run them on the street just to keep them from getting nails. I assume you would really have to get the tires cooking on a hot day for this to happen so I am sure you will be fine and worst case... you loose a plug and have to go get it patched.

brake fluid should be changed out if you boil it at a track day. Brake fluid isnt that costly to take the chance and I would hate for my brakes to go out daily driving. would cost a LOT more than two bottles of fluid that is for sure
Awesome thanks a lot for the help.

How do I know if I boil the brake fluid? Brake won't work at all?

Insurance won't cover accidents/collision at the track right, gotta be real careful there, I see some GT3RS signed up and other expensive cars!!!! (I guess the fee you paid to sign up, it got insurance for things like this?)

So Just keep an eye on the temps right, shouldn't overheat if everything is working fine. Don't think I read anything about FoST overheating at track day, but the track day is it usually in sessions, 20,30 min then you stop and let other people go, or how long do you guys drive then stop and go back out etc.
 

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Awesome thanks a lot for the help.

How do I know if I boil the brake fluid? Brake won't work at all?

Insurance won't cover accidents/collision at the track right, gotta be real careful there, I see some GT3RS signed up and other expensive cars!!!! (I guess the fee you paid to sign up, it got insurance for things like this?)

So Just keep an eye on the temps right, shouldn't overheat if everything is working fine. Don't think I read anything about FoST overheating at track day, but the track day is it usually in sessions, 20,30 min then you stop and let other people go, or how long do you guys drive then stop and go back out etc.

Brakes shouldn't ever NOT work. but they will get stupid soft and maybe go almost to the floor. you know the fluid is really hot if that happens and the brake lines are blown up(I run stainless lines to keep that from happening.)

Most tracks will have track insurance and it will cover you if something happens, read the fine print, it might only cover a percent or a amount up to *X* I would highly sugggest playing it safe and not messing with a car you cant pay for ;)

cars do fine with the heat, an aftermarket intercooler would help but if you do over heat just take a cool down lap, the car will also save itself and go into limp mode if you do get hot. 15 mins is standard and I have never had my car overheat on 80 to even 90 degree track days.


WHEN you pit... before getting to the pit, pop the hood (reach down a pop the lever) and let air rush under the hood, will cool down quicker and then open the hood up once you get into the pit

DO NOT PUT ON YOUR E_BRAKE!!!! shut off car and put it in gear. block the tires if you aren't on flat ground, (most pits are flat) If you put on the e-brake your brakes can burn to the rotor and weld together. will damage or even destroy your brakes if you got them HOT!
 

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There is some good advice in this thread, but as a former HPDE instructor- I can tell you that as a beginner, the instructor that will be assigned to you (and you will be assigned an instructor, and you will almost certainly not be in your car on the track without an instructor instructing / monitoring you) will not allow you to get in over your head. The very LAST thing that you will focus on is speed. Instead- your instructor will focus your attention on how to use your mirrors, being aware of your surroundings, using hand signals, knowing the track, (the braking points, the turn-in points, the exit points, and where it is safe to pass and to be passed on the track in a non-competitive driving school environment) the flags and what they mean, and what to do in the case of an OTE (Off Track Excursion) or a crash (involving you, or another driver). Going fast and braking hard is for another day far into the future, so mods and high performance parts are not at all necessary now since you will be focused on the fundamentals and will be kept to relatively slow speeds (although as a complete beginner, you will feel like you are going fast, because it's all relative to what your experience is, which for most is driving on public roads).

To prep your car, check your oil, brake fluid and coolant levels to make sure that make sure everything is as it should be, and make sure that you take everything out of it (including floor mats, spare change, your phone charger, etc) and that you have the proper tire pressures. There will be a mandatory tech inspection to check your car for anything loose on the inside or the outside, and to try to identify any potential physical or mechanical problems that may exist. Despite the effort, even then- things happen on the track. I can't count how many times someone blew a coolant hose and coated a corner with slippery fluid then the participants that came around that same corner shortly thereafter all went off the track into the tire wall. When anything good, bad or indifferent happens at the track, there is a saying that goes "That's Racin'", and the instructors and HPDE organization knows it. Their job is to end the day WITHOUT a crash, so they err on the side of caution, and with the beginner groups especially- they make sure that speeds are relatively low, and that passing is only done with a point-by, and only on the straights that are declared suitable for passing.

Don't be nervous- be excited. I predict that this is your first of many such events, because they are really, really fun, and they make you a better, safer driver on the road.

Anthony
 

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There is some good advice in this thread, but as a former HPDE instructor- I can tell you that as a beginner, the instructor that will be assigned to you (and you will be assigned an instructor, and you will almost certainly not be in your car on the track without an instructor instructing / monitoring you) will not allow you to get in over your head. The very LAST thing that you will focus on is speed. Instead- your instructor will focus your attention on how to use your mirrors, being aware of your surroundings, using hand signals, knowing the track, (the braking points, the turn-in points, the exit points, and where it is safe to pass and to be passed on the track in a non-competitive driving school environment) the flags and what they mean, and what to do in the case of an OTE (Off Track Excursion) or a crash (involving you, or another driver). Going fast and braking hard is for another day far into the future, so mods and high performance parts are not at all necessary now since you will be focused on the fundamentals and will be kept to relatively slow speeds (although as a complete beginner, you will feel like you are going fast, because it's all relative to what your experience is, which for most is driving on public roads).

To prep your car, check your oil, brake fluid and coolant levels to make sure that make sure everything is as it should be, and make sure that you take everything out of it (including floor mats, spare change, your phone charger, etc) and that you have the proper tire pressures. There will be a mandatory tech inspection to check your car for anything loose on the inside or the outside, and to try to identify any potential physical or mechanical problems that may exist. Despite the effort, even then- things happen on the track. I can't count how many times someone blew a coolant hose and coated a corner with slippery fluid then the participants that came around that same corner shortly thereafter all went off the track into the tire wall. When anything good, bad or indifferent happens at the track, there is a saying that goes "That's Racin'", and the instructors and HPDE organization knows it. Their job is to end the day WITHOUT a crash, so they err on the side of caution, and with the beginner groups especially- they make sure that speeds are relatively low, and that passing is only done with a point-by, and only on the straights that are declared suitable for passing.

Don't be nervous- be excited. I predict that this is your first of many such events, because they are really, really fun, and they make you a better, safer driver on the road.

Anthony

yeah if you can get an instructor, DO IT!!! it will be WAY better than "figuring it out yourself"

If you have or had the chance to go to STOA, DO IT! it was great and the instructors there are amazing and LOVE their jobs and have passion for what they are doing.
 
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