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Hi I know the focus tends to build up carbon I was wondering would seafom be a good idea to use or should I go the expensive route and walnut blast. What’s the best route to clean the carbon up.
 

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Hi I know the focus tends to build up carbon I was wondering would seafom be a good idea to use or should I go the expensive route and walnut blast. What’s the best route to clean the carbon up.
Seafoam is not the best choice, you really don't want to run anything through the turbo. Pulling the intake manifold and spraying it on the valves and then scrubbing them with a tooth brush, or other small brush and then sucking out the gunk would be better. I just use rubbing alcohol on the valves, let it sit for a few minutes, scrub a bit, suck out the gunk with my shop vac, rotate the engine and do the next set. It is really much easier than you would think.
 

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Seafoam is not the best choice, you really don't want to run anything through the turbo. Pulling the intake manifold and spraying it on the valves and then scrubbing them with a tooth brush, or other small brush and then sucking out the gunk would be better. I just use rubbing alcohol on the valves, let it sit for a few minutes, scrub a bit, suck out the gunk with my shop vac, rotate the engine and do the next set. It is really much easier than you would think.
Ok thanks again I don’t want to break the turbine so I’ll go with your method. Thank god I waited and didn’t go with seafoam that would of been bad. I’ll figure out how to take off the manifold and so on thanks again.
 

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Ok thanks again I don’t want to break the turbine so I’ll go with your method. Thank god I waited and didn’t go with seafoam that would of been bad. I’ll figure out how to take off the manifold and so on thanks again.
Manifold removal:
 

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If you choose to go above and beyond manually cleansing, invest in WMI or 2/4 port aux fuel

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Manifold removal:
Another question will I have to rotate the cylinders when cleaning?
 

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Another question will I have to rotate the cylinders when cleaning?
Yes, take off the passenger front wheel and you can get to the bolt on the balancer, I forget what size it is, maybe 22mm???
 

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Seafoam is not the best choice, you really don't want to run anything through the turbo. Pulling the intake manifold and spraying it on the valves and then scrubbing them with a tooth brush, or other small brush and then sucking out the gunk would be better. I just use rubbing alcohol on the valves, let it sit for a few minutes, scrub a bit, suck out the gunk with my shop vac, rotate the engine and do the next set. It is really much easier than you would think.
I completely disagree on the SeaFoam front. SeaFoam is an amazing fuel additive when used regularly. I add a can every 4-5k miles with a full tank of gas and have on all my cars for years. It cleans everything from the fuel to the engine itself and prevents buildup if used regularly. It makes a notable difference every time I use it. The issue is overuse. It’s not to be added frequently. I’d recommend the OP putting a can in with his/her fuel next time they fill up. I’ve been using it on my 2015 ST since new, I just hit 50k miles and my engine is running like a top


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I completely disagree on the SeaFoam front. SeaFoam is an amazing fuel additive when used regularly. I add a can every 4-5k miles with a full tank of gas and have on all my cars for years. It cleans everything from the fuel to the engine itself and prevents buildup if used regularly. It makes a notable difference every time I use it. The issue is overuse. It’s not to be added frequently. I’d recommend the OP putting a can in with his/her fuel next time they fill up. I’ve been using it on my 2015 ST since new, I just hit 50k miles and my engine is running like a top


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Not talking about the Seafoam you add to your fuel, talking about the stuff you spray into directly into the intake of the car. It's not good for your turbo. If you can introduce it after the turbo it's not as bad, but, if your valves are very caked with carbon and large chunks come off, go through the cylinder and out the exhaust, once again, not good for your turbo. It can damage the turbine impellers. Much better off taking the time to manually clean the valves; I guarantee, Seafoam in the fuel tank will do nothing to keep your valves clean unless you have auxiliary fueling spraying fuel on the back side of your valves..
 

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I took my intake off and used CRC and a brass brush. Bought too big a brush, so could really only scrub the stems, but that CRC is very effective at loosening the baked on stuff. Spray, scrub, suck out, then spray & suck out a few more times. They looked pretty good by the time I finished. 3 cylinders will be closed at the same time if you hit the right part of the cycle. I got lucky with that...only had to spin the engine to do the 4th.

I strongly advise against spraying something into the intake to clean this up. You don't want this stuff impacting the blades. I'd only do that on a N/A engine.

 

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Seafoam is not the best choice, you really don't want to run anything through the turbo. Pulling the intake manifold and spraying it on the valves and then scrubbing them with a tooth brush, or other small brush and then sucking out the gunk would be better. I just use rubbing alcohol on the valves, let it sit for a few minutes, scrub a bit, suck out the gunk with my shop vac, rotate the engine and do the next set. It is really much easier than you would think.
Hmm, that doesn't sound that hard at all, I think I can manage that!
 

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Hmm, that doesn't sound that hard at all, I think I can manage that!
Removing the intake manifold is the hardest part, and that's not too hard. Just follow the guide I posted in post #4.
 

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Removing the intake manifold is the hardest part, and that's not too hard. Just follow the guide I posted in post #4.
Just a question ima planing on removing the manifold to clean out the gunk but when I install the manifold back how many ft pounds do I need to tighten the bolts back on?
 

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Just a question ima planing on removing the manifold to clean out the gunk but when I install the manifold back how many ft pounds do I need to tighten the bolts back on?
I think it's probably inch pounds; I just snug them up.
 

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I completely disagree on the SeaFoam front. SeaFoam is an amazing fuel additive when used regularly. I add a can every 4-5k miles with a full tank of gas and have on all my cars for years. It cleans everything from the fuel to the engine itself and prevents buildup if used regularly. It makes a notable difference every time I use it. The issue is overuse. It’s not to be added frequently. I’d recommend the OP putting a can in with his/her fuel next time they fill up. I’ve been using it on my 2015 ST since new, I just hit 50k miles and my engine is running like a top


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But that does nothing for the carbon on the valves.
 
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