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I just received my new purge valve assembly today. I'll hack apart the old one for the next time this needs to be replaced
 

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I just received my new purge valve assembly today. I'll hack apart the old one for the next time this needs to be replaced
This is exactly what I am doing! My new one should be here tomorrow and the old one will get the @SSgtjrobertson treatment for the next time...and so on...
 

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Hiya @SSgtjrobertson. I noticed that every site if find that sells the same model fuel filter you have (the Earl's #731155) does not show the 10 microns printed between the IN & OUT port identifiers... Made me a bit wary of the China knock-offs, even though the product is made in China anyways 🏌️‍♂️

Anyways, what I was hoping to find out is what the nominal flow-rate is for that valve in our cars. That particular filter shows: * Filter flows 125 gph at 4.1 psi (free flow) and 88 gph at 61.4 psi * Since you bought that one, I'm sure it's fine. I'm just curious to a fault sometimes 🤦‍♂️

They also have 100 micron filtering available for the same price and a similar flow rate... Any reason why I would pick one over the other? If not I can head over to Summit Racing and get one tomorrow, since I'm just getting this assembly/project parted together to do it soon.

BTW, thank you for all of this research, time, & effort you put in to helping us all out with this issue! Documenting everything with clear explanations all along the way like a boss! 🏆
 

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Hiya SSgtjrobertson. I noticed that every site if find that sells the same model fuel filter you have (the Earl's #731155) does not show the 10 microns printed between the IN & OUT port identifiers... Made me a bit wary of the China knock-offs, even though the product is made in China anyways 🏌️‍♂️

Anyways, what I was hoping to find out is what the nominal flow-rate is for that valve in our cars. That particular filter shows: * Filter flows 125 gph at 4.1 psi (free flow) and 88 gph at 61.4 psi * Since you bought that one, I'm sure it's fine. I'm just curious to a fault sometimes 🤦‍♂️

They also have 100 micron filtering available for the same price and a similar flow rate... Any reason why I would pick one over the other? If not I can head over to Summit Racing and get one tomorrow, since I'm just getting this assembly/project parted together to do it soon.

BTW, thank you for all of this research, time, & effort you put in to helping us all out with this issue! Documenting everything with clear explanations all along the way like a boss! 🏆
If you insert an @ in front of the user name it will "tag" him and he will get an alert. May not get his attention otherwise.
 
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Good call @ddfred . I'll edit the post (y) It's nothing that needs rushing anyways. I know quite a few members here work ridiculous hours (I'm one of them, haha). Not expecting immediate replies, but just one of those questions I can't answer without all the tech documents (which either I can't access or just won't pay $150 for, :p).
 

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Discussion Starter · #69 ·
Good call @ddfred . I'll edit the post (y) It's nothing that needs rushing anyways. I know quite a few members here work ridiculous hours (I'm one of them, haha). Not expecting immediate replies, but just one of those questions I can't answer without all the tech documents (which either I can't access or just won't pay $150 for, :p).
The listed flow rates are for liquid fuel. The fuel vapors from the tank will not be effected in the same way. The reason I went with the Earl's filter over the factory filter was due to a few key points.

1. Cost
2. Physical size
3. The ability to disassemble and clean.

While I looked originally at a 100 Micron filter I felt the 10 was a stop gap measure at best. I'm working on resolving the valve issue itself over a bandaid.

The point of the post is to demystify the problem and helpnl others understand the importance of replacing it should they experience any related symptoms.

J
 

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Fair enough. Good point on the relation to the flow rate of liquid vs vapor. You also pointed out that the ST does not originally come with an inline filter in the 1st place, but that the RS does..

I appreciate you looking into this to help find a solid solution. I was just getting the parts lined up to purchase and ran into that question for the flow rates. The 100 micron filter has a larger diameter body as well, I believe. Either way, I'm putting one on :)
 

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New purge valve assy. is installed, old one is modded for the RS valve when it's time. Heat gun on medium setting worked great to get the barbed fittings into the OEM tubing. I put the barbed fitting in a bench vise, then heated the fitting and the tubing at the same time--slid right on easy-peasy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #72 ·
*Update 04/28/2021

So you're stranded with a deformed fuel tank and a P0456 DTC. You need to travel to home, work or a distance that is just not advisable under the current circumstances.

391038

*photo of collapse tank provided by FiveOhGT

Well here's a temporary solution (I must also advise against driving the vehicle but this should get you home).

Pull the cover and cut the line in the middle of the top on the manifold. This will be behind the check valve and will prevent positive (boost) pressure from escaping.
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Use some like a heat gun, propane/butane torch, or any source that will heat the tube until it was very soft (almost melted) and pinch it completely closed. The nylon is very soft under heat, however you need to go slow and apply the heat gradually as the key here is to soften it not burn it. Avoid open flame directly on the nylon to prevent scorching it.
391036

You should use a wide, flat pair of pliers to ensure that the vacuum will be blocked from the purge valve. If you look at the example the I just made you will see that the top isn't completely flattened and the bottom is.

*note the above example of a poor crimp was done intentionally.

Keeping pressure on the tube as it cools and applying a wet rag will speed the cooling process along. Is you're unsure that you've gotten it sealed move a few inches down and do a second crimp

This will destroy the purge valve assembly but should allow you to drive it. Again if it were me I wouldn't but the fuel tank is likely destroyed and the purge valve has completely failed.

Please be extremely careful about performing this as temporary repair. The Purge valve assembly is directly attached to the fuel tank. Any open flames could be disastrous and potentially life threatening. I take absolutely no responsibility for any damage or harm should this be performed incorrectly. You have been warned!

Stay Safe.

J
 

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I finally got around to doing this. As expected, this is quite easy to do, made even more simple by @SSgtjrobertson ’s fabulous walkthrough.

If I may add a few observations:

- I don’t recommend removing the bracket held on by two 13mm nuts. If you still have the symposer installed like I do, it makes fitting a ratchet and socket a bit more difficult. Even if your symposer isn’t there, I found it infinitely easier to just pull the rubber isolator off the bracket after everything else was removed. On installation, you just slide it back on.

- Instead of prying the three supports from the intake manifold, it seems easier to me to just pop the nylon tube out of the brackets. The supports really dig into the plastic intake manifold, scratch it up on removal if you’re not careful, and can easily break.

- Buying the valve as part of the inexpensive RS assembly was a boon in another way: it made it much easier to understand how the QD lock works because it comes unlocked. I thought I had a good sense of what to do by looking at the pictures, but having it in my hand made it abundantly clear how easy it is to just press the lock tabs with my fingers to free it. Tough to describe in words, but having one in your hand makes all the difference before you try to remove the locked one.

- I tried both methods to slide the nylon hose over the dorman fuel line fittings (boiling water and heat gun). I found the heat gun to work much more easily while holding the fitting in the bench vise. Thanks for the tip, @EVH

I couldn't get one side of the nylon hose to fit flush with the collar of the fuel line fitting. It seemed to slide on somewhat crooked, but it cleared all three barbs. Pic below:

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Or perhaps it wasn't cut straight. @SSgtjrobertson , do you think that would cause a leak? I slipped the fuel injection hose further to the left, just short of the last barb and tried to make sure the clamp caught both the crooked edge and half of the collar. Actually I guess this is a broader question for this fix: if there were a leak anywhere, would the car trip a CEL?

Thanks, @SSgtjrobertson . Looking forward to seeing what else you come up with here.

EDIT: Wow, what are the chances that after 9 days of no movement in this thread, I'd post this just as a major update was posted. Great information on the clamping, thanks for sharing!
 

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Discussion Starter · #75 ·
@Melchior I'd say you'll be fine with that. The reason I personally used the boiling water was to ensure that the nylon wasn't over heated, which will prevent it from shrinking back fully and because not everyone owns a heat gun. When I started down the path of researching this issue I wanted to do so in a way that everyone could benefit. Many people own these vehicles and aren't equipped with an abundance of tools or ability to perform their own work.

This is frustrating as it puts them at the mercy of dealerships and automotive repair services that may not have the greatest understanding of quirks and challenges the ST presents.

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Great suggestions above! Thanks for the kind words and I'm always here to help in any way I can.

And yeah I may have a few new projects up my sleeve for the summer.

Stay safe
J
 

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@Melchior--All good points. I came to the same conclusions as you regarding the bracket/isolator and the support clips. It was much easier to slip the bracket out of the rubber isolator than to get at and remove the bolts. It was also cake to leave the clips in place and just slip the tube out of retainers. I had a new assembly as well, which let me see how the QD locks worked before attempting removal. I figured that by buying a new complete ST assembly, I could install that and hack-up the old one for future quick-changes of the valve only
 
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Does this have anything to do with the purgey sounding noise coinciding with the BOV?

The FTD recall is mentioned in the carfax, was my only hes. about buying the car, no mention of being fixed...
had a CEL on last week, cleaned a bunch of connectors, filled a low rear tire, and it went away
 

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Well I never experienced any symptom until I read this. Now I'm gonna order the parts :(

well I have serval gaskets need to replace but sitting in my garage for couple of years now and keep leaking tiny amount of oil here and there and I don't want open the valve cover or shifter tower etc

what am I doing
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
Yes, very likely or the canister purge valve.
Also check the fuel tank for deformation.
 
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