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I haven't had issues yet, but am thanks to your heads up proactive guide, I will be ordering parts to replace and make future assessment easier. Tasca has the RS assembly mad cheap, but almost cost the same to ship it, so unless you have other items.. I have found Amazon has it prime shipped, under Tasca total price.
 
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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
I haven't had issues yet, but am thanks to your heads up proactive guide, I will be ordering parts to replace and make future assessment easier. Tasca has the RS assembly mad cheap, but almost cost the same to ship it, so unless you have other items.. I have found Amazon has it prime shipped, under Tasca total price.
I purchased the RS Assembly locally. You can also find out of state Ford dealers that will undercut other dealers on the bay. No honor among thieves I guess.
 
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Awesome write-up. Thanks for doing it!

My 2018 is not part of the recall. Is there a newer revised version of the part that my car already has? Should I do this anyway? I have no symptoms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
It's the same bosch valve regardless of model year. This is not a matter of "if" you're going to experience an issue than it is "when".

The ultimate goal for the post is so that others may understand what the valve is, how it may fail, and how to fix it without spending a fortune to do so.

Far too many times auto manufacturers come up with fixes to their own cheapskate problems instead of addressing the issue as a whole. The quality of items manufactured today are subpart best. Due to the cost of the valve by itself I personally am treating this as a maintenance item moving forward.

You can either wait till you experience an issue to the purchase the necessary items but keep in mind you really have to be in tune with how the vehicle is acting. Too many times people wait until there is either significant damage or they're stranded on the side of the road in which case not having the items to make the repair can be a real liability.

Stay Safe
J
 
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I read back through and thinking what is the best plan? I'm under 50,000 miles but want to do this by fall. I occasionally get a small idle fluctuation.
I want to have something usable, so enough stuff for a spare CPV assembly...

Maybe get the cheap complete CPV asm off rock auto for just for the stock tubing and fittings?

And RS hose asm or cheaper eBay valve for the CPV?

And the small filter to keep carbon out of the valve?

Much appreciate the research and info 👍🙂
 

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Part 2:

How to rebuild your own EVAP purge valve assembly for a fraction of the price and make future repairs a thousand times easier, or the shorter name: The FU Ford EVAP Fix!!!

*Disclaimer: As with any write up, and I really shouldn't need to say this but I am not responsible for anything that may result from the modifications listed below. You have been warned.

The real issue here is the actual Bosch evaporator valve itself and not rest of the assembly. The valve is heat pressed between the two sections of nylon fuel line and is sold only as an entire assembly. Ford considers this assembly non-serviceable by the end user.

ST Assembly: BV6Z-9D289-E
View attachment 387943

This assembly as of 02/2021 is $65.00 USD list and should be readily available from any local or online authorized Ford parts dealers.

The valve assembly for the RS however is only $20 USD but will not fit the ST engine configuration.

RS Assembly: BV6Z-9D289-B
View attachment 387944

Both use the Bosch EVAP purge valve that is used on multiple different manufacturers emissions equipment.

Purge Valve: BV61-9G866-AA
View attachment 387945

The Purge Valve can be found between $16 - $22 USD but I offer this warning. Buyer beware as there are several fakes on the market. Also the benefit of purchasing the RS unit is the should a QD lock be damaged you can use parts from the RS Assembly to repair your damaged connector. But that's just my opinion and what the hell do I know...

So the items needed for the fix can be purchased from just about any auto parts store. I did this to keep the availability as universal as possible and the cost down.
View attachment 387931

I stopped off a the closest store to me, which just happened to be an Advanced Auto Parts and purchased the following items:
Qty 1 - foot 3/8" x 12" fuel hose #CQ24088 $1.99 USD
Qty 1 - (2 in pack) Dorman 3/8" (9.5mm) universal nylon fuel line unions #800-011 $7.49 USD
Qty 1 - (4 in pack) Ideal Tridon fuel injection clamps #52F1558 $3.49 USD
Qty 1 - Purge Valve of your choice

That's all you need as far as parts go. After tax here in Kentucky I was well under $40 USD and other than the purge valve itself have enough hose and can reuse the clamps several times over. So in the long run this repair becomes both cheaper and easier in the long run.

*Note I opted to use the fuel injection clamps over the traditional hose clamps due to the fact that they help to promote equal clamping force around the entire hose. This is important to prevent vacuum leaks later on. Another point is the even though the hose selected for this project is capable of dealing with the level of vacuum it will experience I still attempted to keep the runs as short as possible to limit potential issues.

Using the original valve as a measuring point decide where to cut the nylon tube away based on the union and amount of hose you feel comfortable with. I use a small hose cutter that makes for a nice clean cut but a sharp razor knife or heavy duty scissors will also work. I did not provide measurements in this write up due to the variety of configurations out there. Take your time and measure yo shiz!
View attachment 387932


Optional Step: Next find a Ford Engineer and/or Accountant to wing the old valve at as hard as you can!

View attachment 387933

Dawning the tactical gloves that you "forgot" to turn back in after leaving the SWAT Team get a pot of boiling water deep enough to submerge the end of the cut nylon fuel line in. The provided instructions call for 10 minutes to soak but mine took about 7 to get soft enough to push completely to the shoulder of the union using a pair of pliers. Leave to cool while working on the opposite line.

View attachment 387934

Now that both unions are installed I the nylon fuel line measure and cut you desired length of rubber fuel line. Loosely installed the fuel injection clamps and press the length of hose over the open end of the barbed union. Cover the union shoulder with the hose to ensure a leak free fit. Press the other end of the hose over the appropriate end of the purge valve. Do not forget to install the rubber isolator and bracket over the valve before installing it. Now repeat the same thing for the other side of the valve and union.
View attachment 387935

Do Not Tighten Up The Clamps until you have the assembly installed on the engine. This will help you to make the necessary adjustments and tweaks to the assembly for a proper fit.
View attachment 387936
View attachment 387937
Once the support bracket is locked down and everything is tight reconnect the valves electrical connector and reinstall the upper intake and flex section to the airbox.

You're finished. Now down the road should you need to change the valve the is no need to remove the entire assembly from the engine. Just replace the valve.

I will be adding more technical findings and answering questions in the follow up posts for those that are interested. This has been the result of 2 months and almost $300 in parts testing and researching so I really hope that it helps someone out.

Stay Safe and Stay Tuned!
J

*Updates below:

I had received a question regarding how remove the purge valve from the new RS assembly. Well it's very easy since you aren't worried about reusing the nylon hose. You can also use this method to remove the factory QD ends as well if you care to use them for a different project.

First carefully score the nylon tube where it meets the valve. I suggest a razor knife with a fresh blade. The goal here is to score and not attempt to cut fully through the tube. Next use a heat gun, propane, map torch, or lighter on and around the scored section of tube moving the heat source around often to distribute the heat.

They amount of time needed to soften the nylon may vary. Propane or MAP gas my only take a second. The heat gun or lighter may take several. I highly recommend performing this outside because if you accidentally burn the nylon it's going to stink up the area.

Wear safety protection and please don't burn your house down. If you scored the tube deep enough it will split naturally. If not you can help it along with the razor knife. The goal here is to free the valve (or fittings) without damaging them.

Take your time, it will just peel right out.

J
But is it the purge valve ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
But is it the purge valve ?
Is what the purge valve? Is the question about a specific part of the write up, or about the problem in general?
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
I read back through and thinking what is the best plan? I'm under 50,000 miles but want to do this by fall. I occasionally get a small idle fluctuation.
I want to have something usable, so enough stuff for a spare CPV assembly...

Maybe get the cheap complete CPV asm off rock auto for just for the stock tubing and fittings?

And RS hose asm or cheaper eBay valve for the CPV?

And the small filter to keep carbon out of the valve?

Much appreciate the research and info 👍🙂
If it were me as the person experiencing the problem and I had found this write up I personally would have only went one of two ways.

1. If I had doubts about my mechanical abilities I would buy the factory assembly and change it out as a whole.

2. If I was confident that I had the knowledge (and time) I would purchase the hose, clamps and barbed fittings along with the factory RS Assembly and retrofit my existing valve assembly. You can pick up the RS Assembly and use that valve plus take the clips out of it should the factory ones become damaged during the removal process.

Glad it helped.

J
 
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If it were me as the person experiencing the problem and I had found this write up I personally would have only went one of two ways.

1. If I had doubts about my mechanical abilities I would buy the factory assembly and change it out as a whole.

2. If I was confident that I had the knowledge (and time) I would purchase the hose, clamps and barbed fittings along with the factory RS Assembly and retrofit my existing valve assembly. You can pick up the RS Assembly and use that valve plus take the clips out of it should the factory ones become damaged during the removal process.

Glad it helped.

J
3. Be confident in my mechanical abilities but just lazy like I am and just buy the whole assembly

Sent from my SM-G986U using Tapatalk
 

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So when we replace the valve (whether with the RS valve, another ST unit, or OEM-style), aren't we installing just a non-broken version of the same valve? Won't it keep happening?
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Yup. Working on that next, but now it gives people options and a better understanding of the issue. When the valve can now be replaced for roughly the same cost as a factory air filter there really isn't an excuse not to protect your vehicle.
 

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Just a quick clarification: You listed BV6Z-9D289-B as the part number RS assembly, but your photo shows BV6Z-9D289-R. According to Tasca, this part number supersedes BV6Z-9D289-B. So am I right in assuming that cannibalizing the valve from BV6Z-9D289-R will be fine for all 2013-18 FoSTs?
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
Just a quick clarification: You listed BV6Z-9D289-B as the part number RS assembly, but your photo shows BV6Z-9D289-R. According to Tasca, this part number supersedes BV6Z-9D289-B. So am I right in assuming that cannibalizing the valve from BV6Z-9D289-R will be fine for all 2013-18 FoSTs?
They all use the same Bosch valve. In fact these valves are used across multiple different manufacturers. It's just a cheap design.
I'm currently working on something that would prevent the issue either by supplementing the OEM valve or by eliminating it all together. It will take more research before I felt comfortable releasing it for others to try. I also have serious concerns about the federal government and their nonsense regulations regarding emissions equipment. Seeing as they now yet again are overreaching into our lives and hobbies.
 

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Where is the filter located on the RS? Between the purge valve and firewall?

I think I will purchase an extra purge valve to have on standby if/when my OEM one fails.
 

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Where is the filter located on the RS? Between the purge valve and firewall?

I think I will purchase an extra purge valve to have on standby if/when my OEM one fails.
The OEM valve will fail; I replaced mine at 50,000 miles and will do it every 25,000 from now on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Where on the RS is the additional vapor filter assembly located?

It seems like the RS suffers from the same issue.
Everything with this style suffers this issue.
The filter is sold as an assembly and not considered a serviceable item to the best of my knowledge.
 
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