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Part 1:

So I was this contemplating just how I was going to approach this particular topic. Do my normal overly technical explanation? Start off with a meaningful antidote or compelling story to help the reader relate to the topic at hand? No, because of the amount of headaches that this part inflict's on our community this statement will mostly be accepted by those that read it.


**** Ford, their engineers, accountants and for the EPA's constantly moving the "clean air" goal post whenever the hell they feel like it.

Okay so while I work through my anger issues let's talk about the bane of a ST owners existence. The EVAP purge valve sits just next to the engine near the vacuum and high pressure fuel pump. It's job is to release excessive fuel vapors that naturally build in the fuel tank. When it works correctly that is. When it's doesn't it induces rough idle, stalling, or deformed fuel tanks.

The Focus ST models here in the USDM use assembly part number BV6Z-9D289-E. This part normally retails for roughly $65 USD before tax and shipping. The one I recently ordered cost $73 USD shipped from my local Ford dealer. Other models of Ford focus, including the AWD RS use this valve that can be found for less than a third of the ST assembly but will not fit the ST's configuration.

This valve itself is very simple in function and extremely cheap in it manufacturing quality. A quick disconnect fitting just above the throttle body on the passenger side of the intake manifold runs up and through a one way check valve that prevents a positive pressure (boost) from damaging the evaporator system. The nylon fuel hose then runs across the intake manifold and turns back towards the rear of the engine on the drivers side terminating at what would be concerned the purge valves output, or the portion of the valve that see vacuum.

The inlet of the valve has a similar, yet shorter section of nylon fuel line and quick disconnect fitting that attaches to the metal line leading back to the fuel vapor canister.

The theory therfore should be that vacuum pressure alone should be able to keep this valve closed unless acted upon by an outside force (in this case the PCM commanding the valve open via a 12 VDC electromechanical solenoid.) However the issues begin to arise whenever this valve allows manifold vacuum to escape past the sealing surface of the valve pulling a vacuum at idle and cruise. This can result in rough idle, strange rich/lean AFR, stalling randomly or immediately after refueling, P03XX codes (random cylinder misfires) and worst-case scenario it can cause the deformation of the fuel tank.

Safety recall 18S32 (*see attached PDF) covers the fuel tank deformation but little more than slap a bandaid on a sucking chest wound.
Also in Ford's infinite wisdom their "fix" includes a PCM calibration that will update the PCM to a newer model year doing two things 1. It eliminates the .040" evap leak test, leaving only the .020" test making the issue more likely to occur and 2. Leaving those of us who use aftermarket tuners such as the Cobb Accessport unable to reinstall our tune without assistance from the either Cobb or the individual tuner.

And best of all the this "fix" did zero to address the problem so you will continue to experience the failure. But hey, Ford did their part right?

So this leaves our community to look after it's own. Again.

Let's start with location and removal of the offending items from the vehicle. This can be accomplished with a few basic tools in a short time.

Start by loosening the hose clamps from the air box and upper intake pipe. You can use either the appropriate hex socket or slot-head (flathead) screwdriver.

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Next remove the single 8mm bolt holding the upper intake pipe to the engine. The upper intake and flex section to the airbox can now be removed.

Locate the purge valve and electrical connector between the engine and battery box.

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Carefully lift the locking tab from the connector from the valve body and lift upwards.
Inspect the connector pins, wires, & moisture seal for damage. Clean or replace accordingly.

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The valve is supported by a rubber isolator and steel bracket. The bracket is attached directly below the HPFP (high pressure fuel pump) by two (2) 13mm nuts. Using either a deep well socket or standard socket and short extension. I found it was easier to break both of them loose and remove them by hand to prevent dropping them. I really didn't want to pull the lower pan.

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Starting at the rear of the engine and using a small pick or screw driver carefully pry the quick disconnect locking tab away from the QD connector. Again pry carefully as this lock can be easily broken, especially when the temperature is below 50 degrees fahrenheit.

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Once the lock has been disengaged press the QD button and lift away from the steel line. You may need to wiggle the connector slightly in order to allow its release.

Detached the evap tube using a slot-head screwdriver or pry tool by carefully lifting the 3 supports from the intake manifold.

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Next is the most difficult portion of this removal in my opinion due to the tight space between the QD and manifold. The lock is identical to the previous connector and will need to be pried away to allow the connector to be removed. Take your time! A new intake manifold is $68 at the time of this write up.
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That's it. The EVAP purge valve assembly is now easily removed from the engine. But what to with it is the real question. Yes you could simply replace the entire thing for a full price unit but what's the fun of that?

Continued in part 2
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Part 2:

How to rebuild your own EVAP purge valve assembly for a fraction of the price and make future repairs a thousand times easier, or the shorter name: The FU Ford EVAP Fix!!!

*Disclaimer: As with any write up, and I really shouldn't need to say this but I am not responsible for anything that may result from the modifications listed below. You have been warned.

The real issue here is the actual Bosch evaporator valve itself and not rest of the assembly. The valve is heat pressed between the two sections of nylon fuel line and is sold only as an entire assembly. Ford considers this assembly non-serviceable by the end user.

ST Assembly: BV6Z-9D289-E
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This assembly as of 02/2021 is $65.00 USD list and should be readily available from any local or online authorized Ford parts dealers.

The valve assembly for the RS however is only $20 USD but will not fit the ST engine configuration.

RS Assembly: BV6Z-9D289-B
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Both use the Bosch EVAP purge valve that is used on multiple different manufacturers emissions equipment.

Purge Valve: BV61-9G866-AA
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The Purge Valve can be found between $16 - $22 USD but I offer this warning. Buyer beware as there are several fakes on the market. Also the benefit of purchasing the RS unit is the should a QD lock be damaged you can use parts from the RS Assembly to repair your damaged connector. But that's just my opinion and what the hell do I know...

So the items needed for the fix can be purchased from just about any auto parts store. I did this to keep the availability as universal as possible and the cost down.
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I stopped off a the closest store to me, which just happened to be an Advanced Auto Parts and purchased the following items:
Qty 1 - foot 3/8" x 12" fuel hose #CQ24088 $1.99 USD
Qty 1 - (2 in pack) Dorman 3/8" (9.5mm) universal nylon fuel line unions #800-011 $7.49 USD
Qty 1 - (4 in pack) Ideal Tridon fuel injection clamps #52F1558 $3.49 USD
Qty 1 - Purge Valve of your choice

That's all you need as far as parts go. After tax here in Kentucky I was well under $40 USD and other than the purge valve itself have enough hose and can reuse the clamps several times over. So in the long run this repair becomes both cheaper and easier in the long run.

*Note I opted to use the fuel injection clamps over the traditional hose clamps due to the fact that they help to promote equal clamping force around the entire hose. This is important to prevent vacuum leaks later on. Another point is the even though the hose selected for this project is capable of dealing with the level of vacuum it will experience I still attempted to keep the runs as short as possible to limit potential issues.

Using the original valve as a measuring point decide where to cut the nylon tube away based on the union and amount of hose you feel comfortable with. I use a small hose cutter that makes for a nice clean cut but a sharp razor knife or heavy duty scissors will also work. I did not provide measurements in this write up due to the variety of configurations out there. Take your time and measure yo shiz!
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Optional Step: Next find a Ford Engineer and/or Accountant to wing the old valve at as hard as you can!

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Dawning the tactical gloves that you "forgot" to turn back in after leaving the SWAT Team get a pot of boiling water deep enough to submerge the end of the cut nylon fuel line in. The provided instructions call for 10 minutes to soak but mine took about 7 to get soft enough to push completely to the shoulder of the union using a pair of pliers. Leave to cool while working on the opposite line.

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Now that both unions are installed I the nylon fuel line measure and cut you desired length of rubber fuel line. Loosely installed the fuel injection clamps and press the length of hose over the open end of the barbed union. Cover the union shoulder with the hose to ensure a leak free fit. Press the other end of the hose over the appropriate end of the purge valve. Do not forget to install the rubber isolator and bracket over the valve before installing it. Now repeat the same thing for the other side of the valve and union.
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Do Not Tighten Up The Clamps until you have the assembly installed on the engine. This will help you to make the necessary adjustments and tweaks to the assembly for a proper fit.
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Once the support bracket is locked down and everything is tight reconnect the valves electrical connector and reinstall the upper intake and flex section to the airbox.

You're finished. Now down the road should you need to change the valve the is no need to remove the entire assembly from the engine. Just replace the valve.

I will be adding more technical findings and answering questions in the follow up posts for those that are interested. This has been the result of 2 months and almost $300 in parts testing and researching so I really hope that it helps someone out.

Stay Safe and Stay Tuned!
J

*Updates below:

I had received a question regarding how remove the purge valve from the new RS assembly. Well it's very easy since you aren't worried about reusing the nylon hose. You can also use this method to remove the factory QD ends as well if you care to use them for a different project.

First carefully score the nylon tube where it meets the valve. I suggest a razor knife with a fresh blade. The goal here is to score and not attempt to cut fully through the tube. Next use a heat gun, propane, map torch, or lighter on and around the scored section of tube moving the heat source around often to distribute the heat.

They amount of time needed to soften the nylon may vary. Propane or MAP gas my only take a second. The heat gun or lighter may take several. I highly recommend performing this outside because if you accidentally burn the nylon it's going to stink up the area.

Wear safety protection and please don't burn your house down. If you scored the tube deep enough it will split naturally. If not you can help it along with the razor knife. The goal here is to free the valve (or fittings) without damaging them.

Take your time, it will just peel right out.

J
 

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I deleted him, and locked this. Which J can now delete this post and fiddle around, lol
 

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What a write up! Much better than a service manual — Fu ford.

I’m not experiencing any of the symptoms of a purge valve going bad. Should I still plan to do this replacement?
 

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I think we should setup a gofundme/PayPal link for @SSgtjrobertson in case some of us want to contribute a few bucks to these efforts. Right now he's spending his own time and money to do this stuff for the community. @Duece McCracken , is that possible/allowed? He's really doing us all a huge favor and saving everyone at least $40-50 every time somebody fixes theirs.
 

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I think we should setup a gofundme/PayPal link for @SSgtjrobertson in case some of us want to contribute a few bucks to these efforts. Right now he's spending his own time and money to do this stuff for the community. @Duece McCracken , is that possible/allowed? He's really doing us all a huge favor and saving everyone at least $40-50 every time somebody fixes theirs.
Lol, idk.
 

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Lol, idk.
If it means more awesome write-ups and makes it less financially difficult for him since, for example, this one cost him a lot for testing/buying stuff, plus his time is worth something too. So yeah.. I think it's a good idea to give back to folks who've gone above and beyond. I've already offered to send him stuff for reloading 300 blackout, but he doesn't reload that one, unfortunately. ☹
 

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387952

Yeah this is definitely a part you don't want to forget about for sure. For those that are unaware this is the check valve (one way valve) the prevents boost pressure from instantly destroying the valve and purge canister.
 
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Sweet, I have a full-cost replacement that I could do this to before swapping in. Once modded, to change the valve, would one just:

1. Unplug the electrical connector
2. Unscrew the bracket
3. Loosen the hose clamps
4. Wiggle the hoses off the valve barbs

Sound right?
 

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Yes yes yes. Great work, J!
 
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Part 3: The aftermath

So this all started awhile back while reading post after post about strange behavior with both tuned and non-tuned STs. I ketp coming to the conclusion that the one thing that all members had in common was the purge valve assembly.

I was afraid that some were relying too much on Ford's "fix" and others just weren't in the position to drop $70+ after tax & shipping for a new part. Driving around with the failed valve could seriously damage someone's only means of transportation. This effects people's lives and I just didn't feel like the manufacturer was doing enough to respond to the problem. I've personally been in a professional position to decide if writing a citation could mean that someone would possibly lose their job or maybe not eat that week. Stuff like that is aways in the back of my mind.

So the mission rapidly became "What are the average conditions the valve fails?", "Why do they fail?", & "What is the most economical solution for the repair? Now I want you to understand that economical doesn't just mean financial, but also economy of motion. Less time under the hood equals more time on the road.

So I got to buying and testing as many as different samples as possible. I purchased a new assembly for the ST and RS from Ford. Two valves from the BAY and a ST assembly from an aftermarket vendor that is famous for selling low price OEM style parts. Then used my 2017 ST1 as the test mule because luckily enough when parts started arriving my valve started showing the signs of failure.

I did not get the purge valve TSB and have no intentions of doing so. However that is a personal opinion and not a suggestion.

Here's what I found:
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The factory ST assembly was equipped with a Bosch valve that was marked "Made in Mexico" as opposed to the one originally installed on my vehicle that was stamped "Made in Germany". Cost was $65 USD before tax & shipping

The RS assembly was also "Made in Mexico" and cost $20 USD. Picked up locally at dealers.

The two purchased from the bay were both marked "Made in Germany". However only one and ironically it was the cheaper of the two at $16 USD as the $21 USD unit was clearly "Made in China" based on materials used in construction and strange marking not used in the other Ford pieces.

The "OEM" style at $50 USD is straight up hot garbage. Don't even waste your money. Brand new it leaked worse than the original Ford unit with 40K miles on it. Hell even the Chinese knock off was better constructed mechanically, but not electrically.

The anatomy of a valve:
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So what actually fails in these things? Well here I'll show you. A thin metal disc with a extraordinarily small sealing surface is held flat against the valve body with a spring that looks like a should be in a ballpoint pen. When 12 VDC is applied to the coil by the PCM a magnetic field is created and the flat dice is pulled against the coil body.

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This allows a vacuum to be pulled on the canister purge line allowing fuel vapors to be pulled directly into the intake post throttle. While under normal conditions you would never know this was happening because it should only happen under very specific conditions have been met. When the valve fails this extra vaporized fuel can cause significant changes to the air fuel ratio. A 1% increase in raw vaporized fuel can swing a Wideband by 20% in extreme conditions.

Is summation, when misbehaving this valve suck both figuratively and literally.

If you look closely you can see the damage caused by contamination being drawn into the purge canister system that contributes to the valves premature failure.

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In the spring I plan on addressing the canister and lines next. But in my research I found that the RS has an additional vapor filter assembly that our ST's so not currently use. It also is soild as an assembly and not considered "user serviceable". Again I called BS and found that the RS Assembly used a $15 USD filter available just about anywhere automotive parts are sold.

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So I did a bit more research and found the Earl's makes a fully serviceable filter for EFI systems that is equipped with a washable filter compatible with ethanol and is good down to 10 Micron. It's also smaller, lighter and the exact same price as the disposable filter Ford sells.
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So the current plan is to install the filter first between the purge valve and steel vapor canister line. I will remove and disassemble it in the spring. Make note of dirt and debris captured. Then dissect the valve and inspect for damage. Once completed I will purge all the line clean and install the filter in the rear between the canister and steel vapor line. Drive over the summer and repeat the inspections.

In short if a $15 reusable filter will help people save money and protect their vehicles it's worth the effort to me to try.

Moving past mechanical failures let's look at electrical. It's pretty ****ing ridiculous how they constructed this valve internally. The coil itself is completely exposed to raw fuel vapors. In fact these vapors are actively pulled around the coil due to its axial design. Please don't tell me if for cooling effect of the coil because it's absolutely not. So those that tune for a higher ethanol content are possible hasting theirs closer to the grave faster.
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Ethanol is extremely corrosive and hydrophilic (that means it loves water) but you know what hates water? Electronics, and my 5 year old daughter...

So in summation this valve, regardless of origin is poorly designed, cheaply manufactured by the lowest bidder and quite possibly rigged to fail.

So trust me when I say this ain't over, because just you wait until I hit phase 4 testing at in the fall of this year.
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Stay Safe everyone!

J
 

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Sweet, I have a full-cost replacement that I could do this to before swapping in. Once modded, to change the valve, would one just:

1. Unplug the electrical connector
2. Unscrew the bracket
3. Loosen the hose clamps
4. Wiggle the hoses off the valve barbs

Sound right?
You don't even need to remove the bracket. The valve will just pull out of the rubber isolator. Time = $ and my time should be spent with a glass of Bourbon 😏
 
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Discussion Starter #20
So would you say a catch can will help keep contaminants out of the intake manifold and in turn the evap valve?

Sent from another garage.
The oils that build up in the intake manifold rarely escape past the check valve I mentioned earlier. So it really won't help the purge valve at all. If oils are present on the valve sealing surface it's seeing boost. That will destroy it almost instantly. But great question!
 
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