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2023 Jeep Gladiator Rubicon 6spd, 2019 Mustang Bullitt
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Discussion Starter · #2,122 ·
Duece,

I just read through your entire forum thread for the last 4 hours of work and it was enlightening, it has been a slow night to say the least. I have a 2018 st 2 and I just bought out the lease and said time to get to business. I feel lost though and don't know what is worth doing first during my build. I am a college student who is new to cars and is hoping you can shed some light on the subject. Currently I have installed NGK cold air spark plugs, changed all the fluids, put in a cobb V3 access port, rear motor mount, and cobb cold air intake, I am thinking FMIC, Velossa snorkel, and a short shifter plate and new bushings next. I am looking for suggestions on the FMIC and the best way to accomplish what I want to achieve with my build. My end goal is as many bolt-ons as possible with the stock turbo. What do you think is worth getting for my car next?

I'd grab a WHoosh, ESP, MIshimoto, or CP-e FMIC.

JBR trans mounted shifter arm

Depending on your emission requirements, catless or catted DP.

Tighten up the WGA

2.3 Mustang Throttle body

Then you can kinda fiddle around with whatever tickles your pickle. Determine where you want to improve the car, and improve it. Feel it all out.
 

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Duece,

I just read through your entire forum thread for the last 4 hours of work and it was enlightening, it has been a slow night to say the least. I have a 2018 st 2 and I just bought out the lease and said time to get to business. I feel lost though and don't know what is worth doing first during my build. I am a college student who is new to cars and is hoping you can shed some light on the subject. Currently I have installed NGK cold air spark plugs, changed all the fluids, put in a cobb V3 access port, rear motor mount, and cobb cold air intake, I am thinking FMIC, Velossa snorkel, and a short shifter plate and new bushings next. I am looking for suggestions on the FMIC and the best way to accomplish what I want to achieve with my build. My end goal is as many bolt-ons as possible with the stock turbo. What do you think is worth getting for my car next?
Get hood struts! Your going to be under there and that prop rod sucks.
 

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Duece,

I just read through your entire forum thread for the last 4 hours of work and it was enlightening, it has been a slow night to say the least. I have a 2018 st 2 and I just bought out the lease and said time to get to business. I feel lost though and don't know what is worth doing first during my build. I am a college student who is new to cars and is hoping you can shed some light on the subject. Currently I have installed NGK cold air spark plugs, changed all the fluids, put in a cobb V3 access port, rear motor mount, and cobb cold air intake, I am thinking FMIC, Velossa snorkel, and a short shifter plate and new bushings next. I am looking for suggestions on the FMIC and the best way to accomplish what I want to achieve with my build. My end goal is as many bolt-ons as possible with the stock turbo. What do you think is worth getting for my car next?
can give my $0.02 while you wait to hear from duece:

Best IC is anything you can get for a good price that uses the stock mounts or at least the stock location, skip mountune and cobb or anything that extends outside the area that the original IC sits in. My Woosh IC is amazing and was very affordable, Depo is excellent too. Everything else is ok but those are the stand out units.

If it were me, I would get an intercooler, and run a custom tune until you have money for a turbo upgrade. The reason I suggest that now is that some turbo kits require custom DP's and intakes and you'd be best served understanding what turbo you want before you buy any of those items.

in addition! the DP should be one of the last things you do, if you stay stock turbo. The power gains from using an upgraded DP are barely there, even with a cheapo $200 DP, you can get a $100 tune revision for e30 and make significantly more power. Many people like to do DP's really early on, but in terms of money spent they only really shine on an aftermarket turbo.

Final words:
  • take your time researching and deciding who your tuner will be, there are many factors to consider
  • you can run full stage 3 hardware on the stock tune perfectly safely, do not load cobb stage whatever just because you have an intercooler, the risk is not worth the reward.
  • Plan this **** out to avoid spending extra money for no reason.


Good luck!
 

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2023 Jeep Gladiator Rubicon 6spd, 2019 Mustang Bullitt
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Discussion Starter · #2,125 ·

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Do any of those work with the active grill shutters? Some other threads said that Vortech was the only FMIC that lets the AGS continue to function. Is that still accurate?
Only the Vortech.
 

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Ok, so our clutch master cylinder is attached to the clutch pedal. Which is it's own separate entity from the other pedals. Here's a diy guide pointers how-to how to thingy.

I connected a bit of hose and a catch vessel to the clutch slave on the trans, then opened here and pumped the clutch master dry. The clutch hydraulic system pickup from the brake fluid reservoir is at the MINIMUM LINE!!!! So you will not introduce air into your brake system upon failure, or using this technique.

KEEP THIS IN MIND WHEN YOU BLEED YOUR CLUTCH SYSTEM!!! KEEP THE FLUID LEVEL WELL ABOVE THE MINIMUM LINE ON THE RESERVOIR!!!

In the engine bay you must pull the battery tray out, and it helps to shimmy your intake pipe out the way as well.

IF YOU HAVE POWER SEATS!!! MOVE THE DRIVER"S SIDE BACK ALL THE WAY BEFORE DISCONNECTING THE BATTERY!!!

The clutch master is shielded by all of the ABS hard lines, as shown terribly in the pics. II also undid that locking massive harness connector there, it has two push tabs and then a section levers upwards and out to release the connector. Shield both the male and female end from water and brake fluid, I suggest you use some freezer bags or something, and some kind of tape, a nice job for 3m temflex 1700 in black. lol

To remove the feed from the shared brake reservoir, its just a squeeze on the sides connector. Super easy. There will be a bunch of brake fluid still pouring out. You need towels and other means to keep it from flowing all over the joint. I suggest you do this in an area that you can rinse out your engine bay. Brake fluid will eat the paint, and other things. Such as a driveway.

Disengaging the actual pressure hose off the master is one of the standard ford quick connects that involve the little metal wire clip. Just pry it out mostly, it's a captive type, unlike the ones at the slave cylinder end. Be prepared to catch brake fluid, stuff rags under the master, etc.


The pedal assembly is held on by 4 13mm nuts on studs. The topmost of which can be accessed with a few extensions if you poke through right by the steering wheel/column. Thats the easy one!

The other nuts are a bit odd, a ratcheting wrench is handy. You will just have to crawl in there and try to fit.

Clutch pedal has TWO sensors on it. One in plain sight, then one on top of the pedal pivot tight against the firewall. It has a grey connector. This sensor has two hooks, and a securing tab on top which all three interface with the vertical mounting bracketry, close to the topmost 13mm nut. You pull the tab towards the passenger side of the car gently, then push down on the whole unit, it moves like 1/4 inch the just pops out to the right.

There is a barbed wire support attached to the pedal assembly. It was a PITA!!! I just cut it. F-that noise.

Now you can remove the clutch master and pedal. You will need to push the pedal in, it will stay, be mindful that this may shoot brake fluid in the engine bay, so be prepared.

Pull the bracket and rotate it to the left 90 degrees, its going to be weird, and just clear your foot lighting, trust me, it will go. Just be vigilant, and pull as you rotate once you are off the studs. It is pretty tight, but will slide out. You may have to move some of the wires out the way, then wedge it out.

Installation is the same, just reversed.

Make sure you have the odd o-ring on the clutch pressure line that connects into the master. It can be stuck in your old master cylinder.

Really make sure your lines are hooked up, I had two separate blow- offs with the JPC SS line, it sucked. Almost caught a brake fluid money shot when we started to pressurize and bleed the system. The lines can be super difficult to get to "click-in" fully.

WEAR SAFETY GLASSES JUST IN CASE A LINE ISN'T SEATED FULLY!!! Just takes a second to not get brake fluid in your eyes. Seriously, be smart guys/gals.

I did not bench bleed the master, you can't really. It did bleed very well when installed though. It was scary, I kept trying to bleed more, but it was good to go. Which is nice.

I may snap some more pics of the pedal and such, to show that upper sensor connector, so bare with me.

If anyone has questions, hit me up.

This was an excellent how-to and I appreciated it when I was replacing my clutch pedal assembly today. One thing I will add, if you have a 2013 (mine was manufactured in April 2013) there is a very small elongated o ring (probably 5mm long, and the ID of the rubber ring is the samel OD as the solid clutch line that goes into the bottom of the clutch pedal assembly) that will still be inside the old clutch pedal assembly. You will need to gently dig it out and apply it to the end of the hard clutch line or you will definitely spray brake fluid into the engine bay. Ask me how I know.
 

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2023 Jeep Gladiator Rubicon 6spd, 2019 Mustang Bullitt
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