Ford Focus ST Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here at SPEED PERF6RMANC3 we are always striving to answer the question of WHY. Why did Ford decide to make something out of a specific material? WHY are pistons failing at X power level? WHY do we need to make more and more power to keep us happy =D? We are always looking to dig deeper into how we can make each and every product we offer better and better.

When the Focus ST 2.0L Ecoboost engine came out we immediately ordered one so that we could take it apart and analyse the components inside. We found some similarities to the MZR block but we also found a lot of differences. One thing we did find was the OEM crankshaft was cast compared to the forged version on the MZR.

So what does this mean for you? If your looking for BIG power numbers and you know that your going to be pushing the motor to its limits every time you turn the key then your going to need another option.

There are a few options to help enhance the strength of the stock crank without having to develop an entirely new one. One of those options is Plasma Nitiriding. Here is a little more info for those who are unfamiliar.

Plasma or 'ion nitriding' is a method of surface hardening using glow discharge technology to introduce elemental nitrogen to the surface of parts for subsequent diffusion. In a vacuum, high voltage is used to form plasma, and molecular nitrogen atoms are disassociated into an atomic form and are accelerated to impinge on the part. This ion bombardment heats the workpiece, cleans the surface and hardens the metal.

Benefits of Plasma Nitriding:
• Lower operating temperatures allow nitriding below tempering temperatures resulting in less distortion and no adverse effects on core properties.

• Surfaces requiring protection from nitriding can be masked using mechanical means (sheet masks). This negates the application and removal of stop off paints or plating.

• Minimal or no increase in the surface roughness of the part.

• Improvements in wear and corrosion resistance.

• Increase in fatigue strength.

• Reduced co-efficient of friction.

• Varying pressure dictates the degree of contour following. For example, a blind hole can be nitrided or literally skipped over.

• No significant dimensional changes.
We had the crank tested and the results indicated a surface hardness of >30 HRC equivalent as measured with a 1kg load. After the nitriding process we were able to achieve a surface hardness of >60 HRC equivalent as measured at the same load. So what does this mean for you? The final numbers show that the crank should be able to withstand similar abuse as a forged crankshaft. We of course havent tested the real world limits of the factory crank but the hardness and other tests we did are inline with the results we have seen on other platforms at similar power levels. We will be offering this service with any of our blocks (or individual cranks) that we sell on our website.

We are also in the process of doing some weight saving mods to the crank itself so that we can decrease the rotational mass which helps to increase spool and make more power overall. We will have more information on this after we get our first sample back.

Below are some pictures for you to look over:


OEM Crank - untreated

Coil spring Auto part Crankshaft Gear Tool accessory



OEM Crank - After Plasma Nitride

Auto part Crankshaft Gear Drive shaft Automotive engine part
 

· Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
Similar to the cryo freezing (i think) thats popular in the big hp diesel truck world. Except this is an actual coating.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
589 Posts
Hmm...this is interesting. It's probably a heck of a lot cheaper then buying a new forged crankshaft (I hope). Which is always nice.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Similar to the cryo freezing (i think) thats popular in the big hp diesel truck world. Except this is an actual coating.
technically this is not a coating. The darkness you see is just a result of the heat treatment process but nothing is actually "applied" to the surface of the metal.

At what power levels do you guys expect the stock untreated crankshaft to become a worry?
There's too much speculation to guess at this point but we hope to be able to find that limit at some point so that people wont have to worry about exceeding it



Success through failure is one of our biggest strengths.......... :big smile:
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top