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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi,
My stock engine is kaput, so I sourced a basically zero mile 2.0 Ecoboost out of an Escape. I know the oil cooler will need to be swapped, and it looks like there's at least a few very small cosmetic differences with the intakes so I'll swap those as well.

I'm planning on removing the radiator/condensor/crash bar, and will pull the engine and transmission out the front. I'd love some advice if anyone has done this before.

I also have a question to start. Since I'll be swapping over the clutch/transmission and the clutch is self adjusting do I need one of those special self-adjusting clutch install tools, or can I make due without one? I'd prefer no tool since I don't see an immediate need in my future to use the tool again, but also want the swap to go smoothly and done right.
 

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When installing the clutch you are supposed to use the special tools, but then again I didn’t when I installed mine and it was just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
When installing the clutch you are supposed to use the special tools, but then again I didn’t when I installed mine and it was just fine.
This is encouraging so far. I'd love to save the $120ish dollars on the tool purchase if possible.
 

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@SIstomper

I just keep tagging your ass every time someone is tearing bits of the engine/the entire engine from the car and ask for advice.
 

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@SIstomper

I just keep tagging your ass every time someone is tearing bits of the engine/the entire engine from the car and ask for advice.
LOL, yes its easier from the front if you have no lift. http://www.focusst.org/forum/focus-st-maintenance/112786-removing-engine-transmission-bottom.html
Only special tool for the tranny needed is the alignment tool. The throwout bearing can be shimmed but not need if its a new disk. I would change the flywheel bolts also as they are tq to yield

https://www.google.com/search?q=23+...ome..69i57.12467j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm glad that nobody seems to have taken offense to my funny post title. I just meant that this is a different category than "will an exhaust void my warranty?" or "which cold air intake will give me the most HP increase?" type questions.

I just keep tagging your ass every time someone is tearing bits of the engine/the entire engine from the car and ask for advice.
Thank you for that. I’ve read many of his posts carefully and learned a bunch from them.

Only special tool for the tranny needed is the alignment tool. The throwout bearing can be shimmed but not need if its a new disk. I would change the flywheel bolts also as they are tq to yield.
I appreciate the confirmation on no special tool and will definitely change out the flywheel bolts. I was planning on reusing my 45K clutch due to the cost, plus after completing this I'll have a pretty good idea how to swap a clutch on this car so less of a big deal in the future if I need to swap that.
Can you tell me more about what shims I need to buy and how I should actually go about shimming the clutch? Is this covered in a service manual that I should pick up as part of this project?
 

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I'm glad that nobody seems to have taken offense to my funny post title. I just meant that this is a different category than "will an exhaust void my warranty?" or "which cold air intake will give me the most HP increase?" type questions.



Thank you for that. I’ve read many of his posts carefully and learned a bunch from them.



I appreciate the confirmation on no special tool and will definitely change out the flywheel bolts. I was planning on reusing my 45K clutch due to the cost, plus after completing this I'll have a pretty good idea how to swap a clutch on this car so less of a big deal in the future if I need to swap that.
Can you tell me more about what shims I need to buy and how I should actually go about shimming the clutch? Is this covered in a service manual that I should pick up as part of this project?
No need to shim. Your putting the clutch back in the way it was, youll be fine. Just get the alighnment tool for the disk. The shims are more for aftermarket clutches that have a bad engagment point. You can shim the throwout bearing to get less pedal travel.
 

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I'm glad that nobody seems to have taken offense to my funny post title. I just meant that this is a different category than "will an exhaust void my warranty?" or "which cold air intake will give me the most HP increase?" type questions.



Thank you for that. I’ve read many of his posts carefully and learned a bunch from them.



I appreciate the confirmation on no special tool and will definitely change out the flywheel bolts. I was planning on reusing my 45K clutch due to the cost, plus after completing this I'll have a pretty good idea how to swap a clutch on this car so less of a big deal in the future if I need to swap that.
Can you tell me more about what shims I need to buy and how I should actually go about shimming the clutch? Is this covered in a service manual that I should pick up as part of this project?
Indeed, as I usually tell people if I can't help you I'll at least get you in the right direction lmao
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
OK, I have the clutch alignment tool in hand (thanks for the tip, @SIstomper). I have a decent selection of tools available including air tools, and I also have a copy of the Ford shop manual. Does anyone else have any advice as to head-scratcher moments that I may encounter or other tricks that really make this job easier? I know it's not in the same realm, but I've already had the front bumper cover off for the front mount upgrade, so I'm fairly comfortable with how modular the ST is and how everything pretty much bolts together. That being said I know this is a whole other level with pulling the engine and trans out as one assembly and successfully putting it all back together.
 

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OK, I have the clutch alignment tool in hand (thanks for the tip, @SIstomper). I have a decent selection of tools available including air tools, and I also have a copy of the Ford shop manual. Does anyone else have any advice as to head-scratcher moments that I may encounter or other tricks that really make this job easier? I know it's not in the same realm, but I've already had the front bumper cover off for the front mount upgrade, so I'm fairly comfortable with how modular the ST is and how everything pretty much bolts together. That being said I know this is a whole other level with pulling the engine and trans out as one assembly and successfully putting it all back together.
I had never swapped an engine prior, but with a copy of the ford manual I was able to figure out everything and knock it out in 2 weekends. It's a lot of work, just take it in baby steps and follow the manual and you'll get there in no time.
 

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Well looking at doing an engine swap adn was wanting to know if you survived this @ThnxSVT its almost been a year and there is no closure to this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Updating this older thread that I started as the OP. Here's a couple pics of the carnage. Connecting rod snapped, and managed to take out both the front and rear of the block in the process. Engine Auto part Automotive engine part Vehicle Car Auto part Engine Vehicle Automotive engine part Carburetor
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
I've also been rightfully asked to update this post with what I've learned. I apologize, as I had grand plans to update this with a bunch of pics of the engine swap and additional details, but then life got busy.

So here's what I learned, in no particular order:
• This swap was much easier than I would have expected. I probably spent close to 18-20 hours total on the swap, but a lot of that time was BSing with friends or just taking my time. If I was to do it again I think I could probably do this swap in less than 10 hours. Prior to this I had done a bunch of work on cars over the years, but had never done an engine or transmission swap
• I was shocked at how many of my friends and even neighbors wanted to watch and help with the swap. Extra hands were no big issue as I had lots of interest from others. If you’re tackling this job be sure to let others know as I’m sure others will want to swing by and watch the magic happen
• I thought the two hardest parts were getting the wiper arms off the motors (yes really), and getting the dang lower ball joints to separate from the spindles. The latter is necessary to pull the axles free of the trans
• On the wiper arms, watch a few YouTube videos. You will be confused because you'll take off the nuts on the wiper arms, pull up on the arms, and... nothing. It won't come free and they'll be zero play between the arm and shaft, so you'll be confused how they come off. The shaft is both splined and tapered, and the arm fits on tight. Basically just keep rocking the arm back and forth and you'll finally feel it finally loosen up after 20-40 rocks. Do not do what I originally did and try to pop the arm off while using a pry bar. The wiper motor mount is made of pig metal and has lots of depressions in it to make it break cleanly in the event of a crash. You will break the mount if you do anything other than work the arms free with your hands. Again, trust me. Just keep rocking the arm back and forth and it will pop free. If you do break an arm mount it appears the mounts are all the same on 2012-up Focuses regardless of trim or hatchback/sedan, so head to the local Pick-a-Part to get a replacement. If that doesn’t work you can source arm mounts from Tasca reasonably cheap… I believe like $26 last I checked
• In my opinion the part that caused me the most frustration was getting the spindles to pop free of the lower ball joint. I’ve replaced dozens of ball joints and can usually get them out in seconds using my air hammer. The issue on the Focus is that everything is in the way. The axle, the upper part of the spindle, etc. The methods shown in the YouTube videos do work but make it look easy. At least the one video the guy admitted he had already had it apart once, so it comes apart like butter in the video. If someone has a good method of getting the balljoint/spindle separated I’d love to hear it
• The nut on the axle is 32mm if I remember correctly. This is likely bigger than you have in the tool box unless you’ve done balljoint/axle work before
• I used an engine out of an Escape or MKC (I think it was an MKC but can't remember now). It was drop in with the exception of the intake being slightly different (I used my stock ST intake) and the mount for the right axle carrier bearing (again, I just swapped in my stock ST carrier mount). Other than that it was all identical
• I removed the radiator and condenser from the core support. In retrospect I’m pretty sure you can leave the whole core support/radiator/condenser assembled and just pull it as one assembly. It will be heavy enough and clumbsy enough that you’ll likely want a friend to help you pull it off and swing it around, but I think it’s totally doable and will save you over an hour in time disassembling and reassembling these parts
• Do yourself a favor and source all the little odds and ends before you start the job. From what I remember that was the correct Ford brake fluid (clutch uses the brake reservoir), flywheel screws, axle circlips, axle nuts (they’re one time use) and probably a few other things I’m forgetting. I also replaced my hydraulic throw out bearing just because I was already in there and they are reasonably cheap
• The only other issue that I had was an intermittent weak starting issue that I eventually chased down to a loose ground. A friend handled that part originally, and I think he just forgot to tighten the ground as we were taking care of all the other little things
• Oh, and the engine cost was ~$700 from LKQ. That was a complete long block with turbo, intake, etc. Basically everything but the accessories or transmission. Engine had less than 1K miles, plus some kind of warranty although I don’t remember how long anymore. Doesn’t matter anyway since the engine was perfect
• Buy some moving blankets from Harbor Freight and lay them to the one side of the car. That way you can just set parts on them while you pull the parts off, plus set the parts with the fasteners so you'll know what they go to


That’s what I remember off the top of my head. If anyone has any questions please post them in here and I’ll answer in this thread to hopefully help others down the road.
 

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Glad to see it's a "regular Joe's" garage job. Gives me confidence if I ever run into issues! Now... to find a low mile motor to leave in the crate in a corner...
 

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Looks like a fun group! Congrats getting it put back together and thanks for the carnage pics, those are some sizeable holes in that block :lol:
 

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Great thread, puts us novice builders at ease knowing a garage swap isn't a big deal as one would think. Good job!
 
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