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Im looking to get a sealant and I need help picking out a good one. Im partial to Chemical Guys but its hard to justify paying close to $40 for their "Jetseal" when in know there are other great products. I have plenty of liquid waxes and spray waxes to use so Im looking for something that will last given my focus is a DD year round. Any help is appreciated.

Mike
 

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Not the response you are looking for, but Jetseal is worth it. I use it with Blacklight and 5050 wax when I do my annual/semiannual seal. Might be worth noting that you will not use a full bottle on the car when you seal it, so your 40 may go farther than you realize.
 

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Im looking to get a sealant and I need help picking out a good one. Im partial to Chemical Guys but its hard to justify paying close to $40 for their "Jetseal" when in know there are other great products. I have plenty of liquid waxes and spray waxes to use so Im looking for something that will last given my focus is a DD year round. Any help is appreciated.

Mike
Meguiar’s #21
 

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Ammo NYC Skin for sealant and Creme for Carnauba wax. Their products are the best out there and I have used a massive gamut of products.
 

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First off, understand that with a sealant you will have to polish and seal it twice a year. Second, different sealants will give you a different look, some give a glossy look and some give a deep waxed look. If there is metallic in the paint, sealants can alter how noticeable this is as well. For example, I used Blackfire Wet Diamond Sealant which gave it a glossy look and made the flake a little more noticeable in person. Here's the Blackfire.


On the other hand, another sealant I used called Four Star Ultimate Paint Protection made the black on the car look deeper but muted a lot of the flake. It's hard to tell in pictures but here's the Four Star sealant.


As for brands and such, it's all objective on personal preference and there are a lot of good ones out there to choose. My favorite though would be the Blackfire Wet Diamond sealant. Again, just my preference.
 

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On most customer cars I use HD Speed. It is an all in one polish, glaze, and sealant. It really needs a da to apply though. If the customer wants to step up and pay for a actual two step I use Megs ultimate line, very easy to work and remove. I know it is called ultimate wax, but there is no wax in it, it is a sealant.
On our cars I use Wolfgang products.
 

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For starters, you don't have to polish your vehicle twice a year when using a sealant. Secondly, Chemical Guys Jet Seal sucks...in fact, the majority of their products are great for weekend warriors, but that's about it. It's a running joke among other detailers. Much, much, much better products out there.

Anyhow, CarPro Reload is a great polymer sealant, as well as Sonax Netshield, and Opti Seal. None of these require a polish, but I would decontaminate the paint with an Iron-X type (Optimum Ferrex, 3D BDX, Shine Supply Cool Guy) of product and follow up with a fine clay as to not marr the paint with a medium grade. Polymer sealants will hold up better and last longer, especially in the summer months where you paint can get above 180 degree where waxes will break down.
 

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For starters, you don't have to polish your vehicle twice a year when using a sealant.
That's debatable and depends on a lot of factors in my opinion, but why would you only clay after 6 months of exposure? If you had a sealant that didn't have 6+ months durability, then that's another factor. But when I was using sealants and before I applied the Four Star sealant above, there was still some of the Blackfire sealant protecting the paint and you're not going to have the cleanest and best prepped surface for bonding just by claying. Maybe if you're using a spray sealant every few months where you can apply it whenever you start seeing it lose its properties. But when I lived up north, I would polish and seal in the spring and fall, because once snow falls I'm not doing any in depth details and I can't wait for the sealant to fully break down before detailing it again.
 

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That's debatable and depends on a lot of factors in my opinion...
Polymer sealant vs. coating...we're talking sealants. Also, I never stated 6 months before clay. The simple "bag" trick after a wash will tell you when it's time to clay your vehicle. Polishing your vehicle twice a year just to have "proper bonding" with a polymer sealant is overkill. If someone has the time, tools, and knowledge to do that, I'd suggest they step into doing a full correction, ceramic coating like CarPro CQUK, lay down two layers, and Reload every 3 to 6 months for added protection.

If I were to tell my customers that they needed to pay me $275-$235 every 6 months for me to light polish their vehicle in order to apply a polymer sealant, I'd never see that business. Also, if I need to polish my vehicle every 6 months or their, then I'm clearly not washing it properly.

If you have the tools, products, time, and the know how, do a full correction on your vehicle, apply a ceramic coating, maintain it and call it a day. If you don't have these tools, you will be perfectly ok with applying a polymer sealant without any sort of paint correction. If you notice after 3 months that it's not reacting the way it should due to weather or wash methods, then apply more and call it a day.
 

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I clay and polish my cars in the spring, and apply a sealant in spring and fall, and a reload type product in summer and winter. I also use a spray sealant every two to three weeks, and a spray wax once every other week or so. Usually the spray sealant is my drying agent, or just ONR mixed as a QD.
 

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I was gonna post my opinion about jet seal but looks like @axisyellow beat me to it. Jet seal is a joke and is not used at all by actual detailers. Yes chemical guys products smell good but that's really all they have. A good smelling product.

I would also recommend using car pro reload on your car. It's an awesome product and after 6 months after the last application, it's still sheeting water off like day 1. FB_IMG_1463412156754.jpg
 

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I've been using Menzerna PowerLock lately and I've really been liking it. It does seem to mute metallic flake a bit but it has a beautiful "saran-wrap" type gloss to it. One of my favorite parts is how easy it is to work with, I've used a fair number of sealants over the years and I think PowerLock might be one of the easiest to use and gives a very classic sealant look. Everybody seems to go crazy for depth and bringing out metallic flake but lately I've really gravitated towards straight up gloss as one of my primary goals, even at the expense of muting other qualities. So take my recommendation with a grain of salt depending on what you're looking for.
 

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Polymer sealant vs. coating...we're talking sealants. Also, I never stated 6 months before clay. The simple "bag" trick after a wash will tell you when it's time to clay your vehicle. Polishing your vehicle twice a year just to have "proper bonding" with a polymer sealant is overkill. If someone has the time, tools, and knowledge to do that, I'd suggest they step into doing a full correction, ceramic coating like CarPro CQUK, lay down two layers, and Reload every 3 to 6 months for added protection.

If I were to tell my customers that they needed to pay me $275-$235 every 6 months for me to light polish their vehicle in order to apply a polymer sealant, I'd never see that business. Also, if I need to polish my vehicle every 6 months or their, then I'm clearly not washing it properly.

If you have the tools, products, time, and the know how, do a full correction on your vehicle, apply a ceramic coating, maintain it and call it a day. If you don't have these tools, you will be perfectly ok with applying a polymer sealant without any sort of paint correction. If you notice after 3 months that it's not reacting the way it should due to weather or wash methods, then apply more and call it a day.
If you're charging for it then sure, I can see your point, but I'm talking about my personal vehicle. Is it overkill? Maybe, but I don't mind and enjoy it, especially to make sure my last sealant is completely removed and give the next sealant the cleanest surface I can provide for longevity. But that's just me, and from what I recall reading when I first started learning had said the same thing, but that was from enthusiasts so it probably wasn't needed..
 

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Any product is better than nothing.

Almost any product and proper procedure is going to do you just fine. But the best product that you are comfortable shelling out for.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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If you're charging for it then sure, I can see your point, but I'm talking about my personal vehicle. Is it overkill? Maybe, but I don't mind and enjoy it, especially to make sure my last sealant is completely removed and give the next sealant the cleanest surface I can provide for longevity. But that's just me, and from what I recall reading when I first started learning had said the same thing, but that was from enthusiasts so it probably wasn't needed..
You understand that you only have an average of 2 mils of clear coat on your vehicle and when you compound/polish you're removing clear coat, right? Why would you want to remove clear coat twice a year just to have a proper surface for your sealant to bond? Have you had 3rd party testing done on a panel to test the longevity of your sealant? How much more time are you getting out of it vs. no polishing? Hell, if you have a junk panel, wash it, clay it, tape a line down the middle, polish one side, apply your sealant to the entire area, set it outside on a saw horse, wash it once every two weeks, and see just how much longer the polish side beads compared to the non polished side and ask yourself if that extra time was worth the clear coat removed. Even if you are only removing .1 when polishing, it's not worth it to me, but that's just my opinion.
 

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You understand that you only have an average of 2 mils of clear coat on your vehicle and when you compound/polish you're removing clear coat, right? Why would you want to remove clear coat twice a year just to have a proper surface for your sealant to bond? Have you had 3rd party testing done on a panel to test the longevity of your sealant? How much more time are you getting out of it vs. no polishing? Hell, if you have a junk panel, wash it, clay it, tape a line down the middle, polish one side, apply your sealant to the entire area, set it outside on a saw horse, wash it once every two weeks, and see just how much longer the polish side beads compared to the non polished side and ask yourself if that extra time was worth the clear coat removed. Even if you are only removing .1 when polishing, it's not worth it to me, but that's just my opinion.
I do, but it's more of a fine polish with minimal cut. And there are so many thoughts on how much you remove when polishing, how long LSP's really last and can you even tell when it's done, etc. that my opinions on it may vary from yours or anyone elses without there being any absolutes. And one could argue that if there is a sealant left over, are you really removing much clear coat versus the product itself, similar to if you polished a coating? There are so many variables for everything and it's just splitting hairs and mostly personal opinions when it comes to things like this. I've read plenty of discussions on if you're polishing twice a year, will you actually burn through clear coat before the car becomes scrap, and there is no solid answer of evidence, just speculation.

So I was simply sharing what I've always done and heard the same from others. Whatever procedure gets you the results you want (with proper technique) then that's all that matters. There's no set in stone right or wrong and it's certainly not worth beating a dead horse over, there's enough of these debates on detailing forums. So I'll respect your work and what you do, even if it's not the same process that I follow..
 

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I'm curious what your process is when you polish every 6 month and what tools you use. Can you please tell me in detail exactly what process you perform?
 

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I'm curious what your process is when you polish every 6 month and what tools you use. Can you please tell me in detail exactly what process you perform?
What do you want to know? I made a post when I did my coating and I went through the same process for sealants, so look at that. Not exactly sure why you're still on about this.. Look up any number of threads regarding prepping for a sealant, they will say wash, clay, polish and seal, which is exactly what I've done. Even directions on the bottle of my Blackfire say to polish. So again, what exactly is your issue with this? If it's the whole removing too much clear coat, how would you know exactly how much is removed each time? There are so many variables and people who do the same exact thing as me and have for years without issue.

But this topic has gotten way off topic, and besides you not approving of my method because you do it for a living and know everything, this isn't going anywhere so I'm not going to bother clogging this up any more. If you want to PM me to curb your frustration over who knows what, feel free.
 

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I do, but it's more of a fine polish with minimal cut. And there are so many thoughts on how much you remove when polishing, how long LSP's really last and can you even tell when it's done, etc. that my opinions on it may vary from yours or anyone elses without there being any absolutes. And one could argue that if there is a sealant left over, are you really removing much clear coat versus the product itself, similar to if you polished a coating? There are so many variables for everything and it's just splitting hairs and mostly personal opinions when it comes to things like this. I've read plenty of discussions on if you're polishing twice a year, will you actually burn through clear coat before the car becomes scrap, and there is no solid answer of evidence, just speculation.

So I was simply sharing what I've always done and heard the same from others. Whatever procedure gets you the results you want (with proper technique) then that's all that matters. There's no set in stone right or wrong and it's certainly not worth beating a dead horse over, there's enough of these debates on detailing forums. So I'll respect your work and what you do, even if it's not the same process that I follow..
I agree, there are many variables involved. Type of polish/compound, pads you use and what is currently on the paint.

Like @Cooper I polish in the spring and reseal in the fall. Another option for prepping the paint is to use a paint cleaner like Pinnacle Paintwork Cleansing Lotion uses chemicals vs abrasives. If you are using the same product I would just clay and reseal.

Unlike most here I like Jetseal. I used it the past 2 winters and have no complaints. I did try Menzerna PowerLock this spring and agree it is also a good sealant. Collinite waxes are known for there longevity but have a bit of a learning curve.
 
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