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Discussion Starter #1
I would like to know what everyone's knowledge and experience is with rustproofing/undercoating their focus. I live in the "rust belt" where road salt in the winter beats the hell out of your car. Those in the south probably don't need it and may not have ever heard of it.

Anyway, I've had they oil based rust proofing sprayed on my other vehicle 3-4 times over the past 10 years and it's kept it in good condition relative to similar vehicles in the area. I'm thinking of doing the same again. Worth $99, IMO.

Does anyone have any tips/tricks for anything like removing dust shields prior to having their focus sprayed to maximize coverage? Or places on the car to tell them to avoid? It was somewhat unavoidable but the oil did a number on my door gaskets after a while. Worth it in the end though. I'm thinking of removing the main dust shield in the front of the car to be sure I get good coverage. I've had to have them re-spray in the past because they're lazy/conserving product and I want them to be thorough as this is my first brand new car.

Thanks!
 

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Three Maine winters with no additional undercoating nor oil spray. The floorpan is clean and rust free. The subframe edges, suspension links etc. have some surface rust on their edges.

Alex at Stratified Automotive did a post a while back about some oil-based product he uses up in Canada that he swears by.

Hope that helps,
Mark
 

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Three Maine winters with no additional undercoating nor oil spray. The floorpan is clean and rust free. The subframe edges, suspension links etc. have some surface rust on their edges.

Alex at Stratified Automotive did a post a while back about some oil-based product he uses up in Canada that he swears by.

Hope that helps,
Mark
I have these same areas with rust forming on my 14' is it anything to be concerned about? I was always of the mindset that any rust is bad rust. I was going to eventually see about having it sanded off and undercoated.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Different parts can handle various amounts of rust, so I wouldn't necessarily worry about the integrity of suspension or brake parts on a 2014, it just makes them a PITA to work on.

Also, I'm sure POR15 is a great product, but not what I'm looking for. Why would I spend $50-$100+ on a product only to have to deal with the hassle of trying to apply it in my driveway without a lift?

What I'm looking for, and maybe it's too early to tell, are areas that are weaknesses for these cars specifically, or things people have done on these cars to best protect them/apply rustproofing.
 

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Since the ST is new to me I cannot answer your question in regards to trouble spots, be interested to know those myself.

One thing I have always done with our vehicles is every spring they go up on jack stands and tires come off for a thorough cleaning/inspection. Feel this is the best way to help preserve your vehicle as there will always be some unforeseen issue no matter how much prevention you do. Couple this with rust proofing/undercoating and you're golden. It might seem excessive but on the other hand it has possibly saved my life. For instance Dodge(or now Ram) like to put little plastic clips on their brake lines in which hold moisture and rusts out the brake lines, had I not been OCD about spring cleaning I may of not noticed this until it was too late, front and rear systems were both leaking as seen in this picture below. Dodge brake lines.jpg
 

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Different parts can handle various amounts of rust, so I wouldn't necessarily worry about the integrity of suspension or brake parts on a 2014, it just makes them a PITA to work on.

Also, I'm sure POR15 is a great product, but not what I'm looking for. Why would I spend $50-$100+ on a product only to have to deal with the hassle of trying to apply it in my driveway without a lift?

What I'm looking for, and maybe it's too early to tell, are areas that are weaknesses for these cars specifically, or things people have done on these cars to best protect them/apply rustproofing.
Bolt heads, exposed threads, nuts. Those are all fair game for rust proofing for me. It will make the difference between using socket wrench or an angle grinder 100,000 miles from now.

Personally, spending $100 once is far better than paying someone $100 four times. Ask around, you'll find someone with a lift that will be willing to help out.

If that doesn't work out, buy a 5 gallon bucket of driveway tar, pour it in a puddle and drive through it really fast. That what your undercoating seems like to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Different parts can handle various amounts of rust, so I wouldn't necessarily worry about the integrity of suspension or brake parts on a 2014, it just makes them a PITA to work on.

Also, I'm sure POR15 is a great product, but not what I'm looking for. Why would I spend $50-$100+ on a product only to have to deal with the hassle of trying to apply it in my driveway without a lift?

What I'm looking for, and maybe it's too early to tell, are areas that are weaknesses for these cars specifically, or things people have done on these cars to best protect them/apply rustproofing.
Bolt heads, exposed threads, nuts. Those are all fair game for rust proofing for me. It will make the difference between using socket wrench or an angle grinder 100,000 miles from now.

Personally, spending $100 once is far better than paying someone $100 four times. Ask around, you'll find someone with a lift that will be willing to help out.

If that doesn't work out, buy a 5 gallon bucket of driveway tar, pour it in a puddle and drive through it really fast. That what your undercoating seems like to me.
I get it, you have a different opinion. That's fine. No need to make outlandish analogies to try to get me to agree with you. If a product only needs to be applied once, how would it do on bolts/threads? Wouldn't it seize them? My biggest concern is body panels/"frame". You can torch/grind off most bolt on parts. Body work is more expensive. The goal is to get everything though.
 

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I get it, you have a different opinion. That's fine. No need to make outlandish analogies to try to get me to agree with you. If a product only needs to be applied once, how would it do on bolts/threads? Wouldn't it seize them? My biggest concern is body panels/"frame". You can torch/grind off most bolt on parts. Body work is more expensive. The goal is to get everything though.
If the body panels are important, you should remove all the fender liners before you get it sprayed.

POR-15 goes on super thin. It's like the consistency of a deck stain. It doesn't affect the function of hardware if you're careful.
 

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Forget Por-15 and the other rust converters. Go to Autozone and pick yourself up some Fluid Film for $10 and you'll need 2 cans. This product works amazingly well and your car's underbody will thank you. Fluid Film also great in that it's super versatile and can be used for so many different applications so I always have a can on hand. It's basically a spray wax that remains tacky that seals the metal from oxygen and salts and prevents rust. The coating should to be applied yearly and for those that are really paranoid, twice a year is even better. As a matter of fact, I just coated my car today when I had it on the lift and unfortunately I didn't take any pictures otherwise I'd upload them. Fluid Film has been used by NASA, US Navy, and many other aeronautical companies that want to prevent corrosion. I'll post a link below of some information regarding the product along with a fluid film youtube video of it being applied.

About | Fluid Film

FLUID FILM | Powerful Corrosion Protection & Lubrication

 

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Discussion Starter #11
Tried fluid film on my jeep. It was a very interesting product to me but wore off very fast. The application points could've contributed, but idk. Also, like I said before, I don't have a lift.
 

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Forget Por-15 and the other rust converters. Go to Autozone and pick yourself up some Fluid Film for $10 and you'll need 2 cans. This product works amazingly well and your car's underbody will thank you. Fluid Film also great in that it's super versatile and can be used for so many different applications so I always have a can on hand. It's basically a spray wax that remains tacky that seals the metal from oxygen and salts and prevents rust. The coating should to be applied yearly and for those that are really paranoid, twice a year is even better. As a matter of fact, I just coated my car today when I had it on the lift and unfortunately I didn't take any pictures otherwise I'd upload them. Fluid Film has been used by NASA, US Navy, and many other aeronautical companies that want to prevent corrosion. I'll post a link below of some information regarding the product along with a fluid film youtube video of it being applied.

About | Fluid Film

FLUID FILM | Powerful Corrosion Protection & Lubrication

Typically use WD-40 in this manner but may give this a try this time around. Can buy it at Lowes too, thanks for the post!
 

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Krown is good oil ,or rustaway ,those 2 seem to be the most popular . My 11 year old cavalier in western ny has zero rust from using rustaway one time .
 

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Part of my standard oil change procedure, on all my cars, is to do a visual inspection under the car. Any areas where I see surface rust starting to form gets sanded/wire brushed, a prime coat of Rustoleum Rust converter which can be purchased at nearly any hardware store or auto parts place. Then I do a top coat of Eastwood chassis black, but any paint would work. By making it part of my oil change procedure I catch any early, it adds maybe 1/2 hour to my coil change procedure, and my car stays nice on the underside. I do this on the chassis, suspension parts, or anywhere else that is metal under the car.
 

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I bought a 2013 ST3 with 16k miles on it and it was not rustproofed when new.
Seeing the car originated in MI, I was surprised how little rust was underneath. The bolt heads etc that showed some rust powder already, but mostly minor stuff. I paid a body shop to completely coat the bottom end with POR-15.
It's been a year now and only one winter, but it still looks damn good. I found a few spots over time that the guys in the shop missed and I brush them and hit it with a spray can of cheap undercoating I got from autozone or something like that. Materials and labor, the POR-15 job cost me like 450 bucks I think... yea, way too much, but I didn't want that toxic crap all over me or my shop floor. If you are a DYI type, heed the warnings.. it's really nasty and toxic stuff before it dries.
If you DO decide to do this and pay someone else, make sure you supervise like I did. Tell them you want to SEE the prep work in person before they apply the product, it needs wire-brushed anywhere there is rust before applied.
Before winter hits, now I need to take out all the inner wheel wells and spray some undercoating up in there. Hopefully I don't find any cancer starting already.
I don't expect the car to last 20 freekin years, but I want it to stay nice as long as possible.
One thing to note: of all the places, the car DID have body rust on one spot when I got it.. 16k miles. Its in the crimp/lip on the leading edge of the hood underneath in the seam. Gotta get that fixed soon before it becomes a problem, but I haven't dealt with it yet. This appears to be a trouble spot on these cars based on what I've read
 

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SOme things about rust.
How the car is stored..
IF the car is usually left put away wet and salty. and the temps are above freezing and the metal stays damp... Rust? Hell yes, big time.
If the car stays below freezing, but kept pretty clean, IE salt spray washed off pretty often.. No or little rust.
Also.. how close you tailgate.. Close.. rust. stay way back.. less rust.
Drive on wet slushy and salted streets a lot; Rust.
Dry Winter cold streets.. no rust.

For the last 20 years I have had indoor heated parking in Wisconsin..
Where I can wash my car anytime since it is 70F in the garage. The large 30 car area allows the car to dry off fast.
I really have no rust issues anymore.

The one spot on the Focus that is odd is the bottom door edge. The lip is rolled up but NOT sealed. So the curve of the metal can hold stuff.
When I wash my car, I usually wipe off around the rolled edges at the bottoms of the doors..
 
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