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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just as the title says. A good samaritan offered to give me a jump start, but they installed the (+) lead to ground and the (-) ground lead to positive. He realized his mistake, played it off as no big deal, and then when he connected the leads correctly, the car didn't start. Here is everything I've been able to determine so far:
Vehicle: 2013 Focus ST2, April 2013 build date.
Symptoms:
Upon putting vehicle in acc. mode (push start button without clutch in) I get a red light on the dashboard and a message pops up which reads 'service engine now!'. Helpful.
It's not the clutch interlock, as pushing the clutch in and attempting to start it while in acc mode does not turn the ignition off. Instead nothing happens, no ticking, nothing.
When putting the vehicle into accessory mode, it displays an 'engine on' message, which is clearly not the case. This is not a warning message, just the standard notification if you have the door open with the engine running.
Vehicle cannot detect key fob unless it is placed into the 'low battery' slot in the steering column.
EDIT: I should mention that this vehicle is not tuned, nor has ever been tuned. The only thing I've plugged into the OBD2 port is a bluetooth interface for reading codes/monitoring engine parameters.

Troubleshooting I've attempted:
Fuses: I've replaced the ECU related fuses and Relays, as well as the starter related fuses and relays. No change.
Battery: I've attempted to start the car when attached to another running vehicle with jumper leads. No change. Would this rule out battery related issues completely?
I attempted to connect to the car using my OBD2 reader, but it says 'unable to connect to ECU' as if it can't even detect the PCM.

I'm not sure where to go from here, and the nearest open Ford dealership is 35 miles away. I want to try everything I can within reason before I pay for the tow and to have a dealer fix my car. But I'm really flabbergasted at this whole thing.

I was hopeful that somebody on here could possibly shed some light on what the heck is wrong with my car.

Best Regards, and thanks!
 

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that sucks man. I don't know about modern cars, but 20 years ago I did this exact same thing to a customers car, (I was a tire guy lol) and bricked the ECU. hopefully something has changed and our cars can prevent people from being stupid.
 

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Did you try taking the battery out and taking it to an auto parts store to have it tested/charged? It may be that the jumper cables you are using are just cheap or may have issues themselves.
 

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This is the part you mentioned that stands out to me.....

"I attempted to connect to the car using my OBD2 reader, but it says 'unable to connect to ECU' as if it can't even detect the PCM."

So from that I would check to see if all the fuses and relays that power to the pcm are ok, physically look at the pcm connections for any arcing and what not. Ive seen this before and unfortunately Ive seen incorrect jump starting fry control units. Sometimes you get lucky and just a fuse, that sucks.
 

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that sucks man. I don't know about modern cars, but 20 years ago I did this exact same thing to a customers car, (I was a tire guy lol) and bricked the ECU. hopefully something has changed and our cars can prevent people from being stupid.
Nope, unfortunately not. What happens in that situation is that your sending power through the ground side, essentially back feeding voltage to a control unit. Engineers dont usually fuse the ground side of the systems.
 

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Have you check this video out? instead of replacing fuses all over the place wasting money, I'd just buy a cheap DMM to check the fuses. Make sure you take the fuse out of the circuit before checking them or you might blow the DMM.

 

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Make sure you take the fuse out of the circuit before checking them or you might blow the DMM.
no need to take the fuses out or worry about blowing a meter up...

two ways to safety use a meter to check a fuse without removing it.

method #1 with the meter set to DC volts, ground the black lead, then use the red lead to touch both little metal spots on the back side of the fuse(one at a time of course) you should get 12ish volts on each side, if you only read 12v on one or the other, then the fuse is likely blown.

method #2 set meter to continuity, then probe both metal spots on the back of the fuse, one with the red lead and the other with the black lead at the same time, the meter should either beep, or show a very low number (close to zero, less than 1.0) or both if the fuse is good. if the fuse is blown, the meter should read OL (Open Loop).

or if you dont have a meter, you can pull every single fuse one at a time (and make sure to put it back in the correct slot) and just look at them and make sure the bridge or fuse link is not broken/blown.
 

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no need to take the fuses out or worry about blowing a meter up...

two ways to safety use a meter to check a fuse without removing it.

method #1 with the meter set to DC volts, ground the black lead, then use the red lead to touch both little metal spots on the back side of the fuse(one at a time of course) you should get 12ish volts on each side, if you only read 12v on one or the other, then the fuse is likely blown.

method #2 set meter to continuity, then probe both metal spots on the back of the fuse, one with the red lead and the other with the black lead at the same time, the meter should either beep, or show a very low number (close to zero, less than 1.0) or both if the fuse is good. if the fuse is blown, the meter should read OL (Open Loop).

or if you dont have a meter, you can pull every single fuse one at a time (and make sure to put it back in the correct slot) and just look at them and make sure the bridge or fuse link is not broken/blown.

You should definitely not try #2 because with the continuity test, the meter is putting out a DC voltage. One of the problem is if you connect the meter to the fuse ends and if the fuse is blown, then you're connecting two voltages sources together and likely with the wrong polarity. See here https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/56066/continuity-tests-risks

Your #1 works most of the time, but you really don't know how the fuse is connected to the system so there's no guaranteed that you'll see 12V. For example, The fuse could be in series with another fuse upstream and if the upstream fuse is blown, then you'll see 0V on both ends of the fuse downstream. Plus again, there's no rule that says a fuse must be connected to the positive rail. Even if you see 12V on both ends, there's no guaranteed that the fuse is good because when a fuse is blown, then it's still possible for both sides of the fuse to read 12V because the circuit might be fried and leaking 12V from somewhere else.
 

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or if you dont have a meter, you can pull every single fuse one at a time (and make sure to put it back in the correct slot) and just look at them and make sure the bridge or fuse link is not broken/blown.
Cheap DMMs are so cheap (~$10) that I wouldn't bother to check visually. Cheap DMMs are ok for checking fuses, but I wouldn't use them for any AC or high power checking.
 

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You should definitely not try #2 because with the continuity test, the meter is putting out a DC voltage. One of the problem is if you connect the meter to the fuse ends and if the fuse is blown, then you're connecting two voltages sources together and likely with the wrong polarity. See here https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/56066/continuity-tests-risks

Your #1 works most of the time, but you really don't know how the fuse is connected to the system so there's no guaranteed that you'll see 12V. For example, The fuse could be in series with another fuse upstream and if the upstream fuse is blown, then you'll see 0V on both ends of the fuse downstream. Plus again, there's no rule that says a fuse must be connected to the positive rail. Even if you see 12V on both ends, there's no guaranteed that the fuse is good because when a fuse is blown, then it's still possible for both sides of the fuse to read 12V because the circuit might be fried and leaking 12V from somewhere else.
This is way more complicated than I ever imagined.

Feeling really bad for OP. If I were you I would take the time to physically check every single fuse the hard way. Seems like only way to know for sure. Do it one at a time, with a clear patient mind & it will be a piece of cake. Hopefully Ford provides some fuse pullers somewhere, if not buy a pair from hardware store as it will make things 100% easier.
 

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This is way more complicated than I ever imagined.

Feeling really bad for OP. If I were you I would take the time to physically check every single fuse the hard way. Seems like only way to know for sure. Do it one at a time, with a clear patient mind & it will be a piece of cake. Hopefully Ford provides some fuse pullers somewhere, if not buy a pair from hardware store as it will make things 100% easier.
I think you could start with @1LoudST's method #1. If you see the voltage is different between the two sides of the fuse, then you're sure the fuse is no good. If that doesn't fix your problem, then yeah start thinking about disconnecting the battery and check the fuses one at time out of circuit.
 

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Did the connection arc and spark like crazy? It should have. Definitely check your fuses. You can buy a DMM if you want, or you can just yank them and visually inspect them. When a fuse blows it usually is visually apparent. Keep your fingers crossed that that dude didn't just blow up your control modules, because it's possible he did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I wish the OP would give an update.
I wish I had a real update to give. I dropped the car off at the dealership about 17 days ago, they claim to have replaced both the BCM and PCM to no avail. Last I heard (thursday afternoon) they claimed to be diagnosing the wiring harness.

I just want my damn car back. Gonna give them a call after work today.
 

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I know the car is at the dealership but have they tested and or replaced the battery yet? I"ve had several occasions where a jump start wouldnt start my vehicle because the battery had a dead cell and replacing the battery with new worked everytime. Just a thought, but since he hooked up the leads wrong it could literally be anything. That sucks! You should invest in one of those portable jump starters and keep it in the car. They work great and no worries about some moron hooking up cables wrong.
 

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My guess would be the fusible links inside the front panel of the battery box are shot. You have to take it out and open it up. There are little metal strips in there that are designed to melt in this type if situation. Hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The dealership said that they may have to replace the entire body main, as they claim to 'fix one issue to have another just pop up in it's place' This is ridiculous, as no car (Especially one manufactured just 4 years ago) should have the entire damn electrical system fail. I am going to talk to my insurance adjuster today, and ask them about replacing essentially the entire wiring system in the car. I need this car no later than the 24th, and the dealership is gonna need to step up their game.
 
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