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What does the Damond Motorsports PCV Plate do, and what does it offer?

The DM PCV plate is a fully machined replacement of the factory PCV oil separator plate, with a port machined to accept an OEM Ford PCV valve and o-ring, as well as two other 3/8” NPT ports, thus allowing you to run a variety of PCV and OCC set-ups.

Incorporating a PCV valve port onto our plate means you are able to retain the correct amount of vacuum on the crankcase, under all engine vacuum conditions. With the additional NPT ports, you’re now able to easily and cleanly run dual OCC set-ups in whatever configuration that suits your car best to relieve excess crankcase pressure. The PCV valve is held into the the DM PCV plate with a retaining ring, allowing for easier install and removal of the valve.

For more info on different dual OCC set-ups, please visit our blog page here: Damond Blog | Damond Motorsports

Each Damond Motorsports PCV plate comes with the following:
2 x 3/8" barb to 3/8"NPT elbow fittings
2 x 3/8"NPT plug fittings
1 x stainless steel retaining ring
1 x OEM size o-ring for the PCV valve
8 x high grade mounting bolts

Optional extras that can be purchased along with the PCV plate:
OEM Ford Genuine Parts gasket
PCV valve plug, for dry sump set-ups or if you plan to run a straight vented set-up with the PCV valve deleted

Our PCV plate is available now here: Focus ST PCV Plate | Damond Motorsports



We're working to add more OCC set-ups to better suit high HP FoSTs, however if you're looking for something optimal for your car, feel free to call or email us, and I can help recommend what would be best for your application. 708-680-6834 [email protected]
 

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So let me see if I understand this correctly...

The PCV hole works just as the stock plate does: Connected to the intake manifold (likely with a catch can in the middle) it evacuates the crankcase when vacuum is present in the manifold and flows nothing when under boost.

When under boost, there is even more blowby, so the crankcase still needs to be vented. In a stock system, venting under boost is done by the hose connecting the valve cover to the pre-turbo air intake tube. This presumes the timing chain and other block-to-head galleys provide sufficient volume for crankcase pressure relief. This system however introduces oil vapor and other blowby nasties into the intake stream, pre-turbo. Some address this with a catch can or oil separator in between the tube coming out of the valve cover, before it enters the pre-turbo cold air intake tube.

Now, with a second hole on this PCV plate, I can block off the valve-cover-to-pre-turbo-cold-air-intake-pipe (to avoid contaminating my turbo and FMIC) and route this second hole to a VTA catch can, with a check valve allowing flow only out of the crankcase.

Periodically the crankcase is under negative pressure, so I would use the third hole as a filtered fresh air source, probably connecting this line to the pre-turbo cold air intake tube, but with a check valve in the line only allowing flow into the crankcase.

Is that how this is intended to be used?

Thanks!
Mark
 

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This presumes the timing chain and other block-to-head galleys provide sufficient volume for crankcase pressure relief. This system however introduces oil vapor and other blowby nasties into the intake stream, pre-turbo. Some address this with a catch can or oil separator in between the tube coming out of the valve cover, before it enters the pre-turbo cold air intake tube.
While i don't exactly understand how the plate works..

I wanted to point out that a oil cap breather helps with the valve cover pressure, substantially

(from what i've seen.. i barely get anything in that rear catch can now)
 

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While i don't exactly understand how the plate works..

I wanted to point out that a oil cap breather helps with the valve cover pressure, substantially

(from what i've seen.. i barely get anything in that rear catch can now)
While running my CFM breather I noticed the same. However very little collects in my can there anyway.

Send from another galaxy.
 

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While i don't exactly understand how the plate works..

I wanted to point out that a oil cap breather helps with the valve cover pressure, substantially

(from what i've seen.. i barely get anything in that rear catch can now)
From the cutaway engineering views, the galley surrounding the timing chain is pretty open, and should allow for plenty of unobstructed flow between the bottom end (where the blowby presents initially) and the valve cover, where blowby on boost finds its way back in to the intake.

I would expect the long climb of gasses up the timing chain galley acts much like a catch can and gets out most of the liquid gunk, which is why everyone who installs oil separators/catch cans on the valve cover line reports next to nothing caught up there in most cases.

Certainly gas pressure follows the path of least resistance, so if you have a VTA oil cap with a big opening versus the surface cross section area inside a little breather hose, guess from where the pressure will be happier to escape? :)

I've been following the whole tunerboost/bugasu to and fro with great interest, so I'm trying to stay up to date on catch can tech. I've got 40K on my car, it's due for an oil change and spark plug change shortly, so I picked up a set of intake manifold gaskets and the CRC DI valve cleaner and plan to pop my intake off when I do the service. If my valves are gunky, I'll clean them and then think about a catch can.

Your testing results with the daisy chained cans will figure prominently in my decision, because I think it's really the only way to settle the whole tunerboost/bugasu area of disagreement as to whether exhaust gas back fill contributes to valve gunking in a major way or not. IOW, if after you complete your test your valves still need cleaning, then we'll know it's exhaust gas back fill that's a major contributor because you will have been using the super-efficient-and-most-awesome Elite can for a while. And then I'll either get a basic WMI system or just suck it up (figuratively speaking) and clean my valves every 25K or so.

Thanks!

All the best,
Mark
 

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From the cutaway engineering views, the galley surrounding the timing chain is pretty open, and should allow for plenty of unobstructed flow between the bottom end (where the blowby presents initially) and the valve cover, where blowby on boost finds its way back in to the intake.

I would expect the long climb of gasses up the timing chain galley acts much like a catch can and gets out most of the liquid gunk, which is why everyone who installs oil separators/catch cans on the valve cover line reports next to nothing caught up there in most cases.

Certainly gas pressure follows the path of least resistance, so if you have a VTA oil cap with a big opening versus the surface cross section area inside a little breather hose, guess from where the pressure will be happier to escape? :)

I've been following the whole tunerboost/bugasu to and fro with great interest, so I'm trying to stay up to date on catch can tech. I've got 40K on my car, it's due for an oil change and spark plug change shortly, so I picked up a set of intake manifold gaskets and the CRC DI valve cleaner and plan to pop my intake off when I do the service. If my valves are gunky, I'll clean them and then think about a catch can.

Your testing results with the daisy chained cans will figure prominently in my decision, because I think it's really the only way to settle the whole tunerboost/bugasu area of disagreement as to whether exhaust gas back fill contributes to valve gunking in a major way or not. IOW, if after you complete your test your valves still need cleaning, then we'll know it's exhaust gas back fill that's a major contributor because you will have been using the super-efficient-and-most-awesome Elite can for a while. And then I'll either get a basic WMI system or just suck it up (figuratively speaking) and clean my valves every 25K or so.

Thanks!

All the best,
Mark
sounds good. the intake manifold gasket is reusable. i've popped it off at least 4 or 5 times
 

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sounds good. the intake manifold gasket is reusable. i've popped it off at least 4 or 5 times
I presumed as much, but in case one stuck and ripped... They were like $1 each, so no biggie.
 

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There are a number of ways to set this up, depending on your application, and needs. We've even had it where one, or both extra ports were routed to atmosphere with nothing but a check valve in the way.
There are many examples here:Bye-Bye Blow-By | Damond Motorsports

If you have questions about what the crankcase ventilation system does in general, take a look here: Crankcase, Under Pressure | Damond Motorsports
 
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