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I just got my used ST a month ago and I need 2 new front tires due to a slipped belt in one and leak in the other. The rear tires have 1 more season worth of tread and I don't really want to drop money on 4 tires right now. Would it be fine for me to have brand new front tires and older ones in the back? I figure It won't effect performance during daily driving since the car is FWD anyways. Any concerns?

Thanks!
 

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I just got my used ST a month ago and I need 2 new front tires due to a slipped belt in one and leak in the other. The rear tires have 1 more season worth of tread and I don't really want to drop money on 4 tires right now. Would it be fine for me to have brand new front tires and older ones in the back? I figure It won't effect performance during daily driving since the car is FWD anyways. Any concerns?

Thanks!
Generally you want the best tires in the rear of the vehicle. If the front tires are worn out you will have trouble with off the line traction and some understeer, but those situations are fairly easily manageable with throttle.

If the back tires are worn you'll run into lift-off oversteer. While hilarious and fun in controlled situations, if it happens to you unexpectedly in the real world you could quickly find yourself swapping ends and crashing. Generally it is safer to have better traction on the rear.
 
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Generally you want the best tires in the rear of the vehicle. If the front tires are worn out you will have trouble with off the line traction and some understeer, but those situations are fairly easily manageable with throttle.

If the back tires are worn you'll run into lift-off oversteer. While hilarious and fun in controlled situations, if it happens to you unexpectedly in the real world you could quickly find yourself swapping ends and crashing. Generally it is safer to have better traction on the rear.
Everything I've ever read is the opposite of this. Your brake do more up front plus steering. Your best tires should be up front. Front also wear quicker.
 

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Generally you want the best tires in the rear of the vehicle. If the front tires are worn out you will have trouble with off the line traction and some understeer, but those situations are fairly easily manageable with throttle.

If the back tires are worn you'll run into lift-off oversteer. While hilarious and fun in controlled situations, if it happens to you unexpectedly in the real world you could quickly find yourself swapping ends and crashing. Generally it is safer to have better traction on the rear.
Everything I've ever read is the opposite of this. Your brake do more up front plus steering. Your best tires should be up front. Front also wear quicker.
Both of these are correct technically for different reasons. UnfocusedST's point is valid because your front is the main control factor of your car..so good front tires is very beneficial. And, since they do wear quicker from more slippage/weight/force than the back, this is why we rotate tires..as well as to prevent uneven wear towards the edges of the tread. So, if you are rotating 4 evenly worn similar tires...then you are even in the rear/front with good tread and okay.

On the other side of it, Loki is correct. Tire professionals often suggest that if you decide to get only 2 new tires instead of 4 then you should definitely put the 2 new ones in the REAR, despite having a FWD car. For stability reasons, as Loki referred to. It seems backwards of course..but it is what is recommended for the best stability. Best course of action to have even traction front/rear is to replace all 4 evenly.
 

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Everything I've ever read is the opposite of this. Your brake do more up front plus steering. Your best tires should be up front. Front also wear quicker.
There's points to both sides. I feel more in control of the effects of worn fronts, whereas surprise oversteer can be hard to manage.
 

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Everything I've ever read is the opposite of this. Your brake do more up front plus steering. Your best tires should be up front. Front also wear quicker.

Most tire industry writing suggests the rear to prevent oversteer even on a front wheel drive car. It is counter intuitive, but every tire industry magazine (yeah they exist) I have ever seen suggests the rear. Since I no longer work with tires, I do not have an article readily available. However, Tire Rack does... https://www.tirerack.com/wheels/tech/techpage.jsp?techid=52

With that said, when I worked in tires, we almost always did what the customer requested which was almost always to put them on the front. No customers complaining about issues afterwards while I was there, so the advice seems to be based on reducing risk rather than being absolutely necessary.

OP, If you can only afford two, then do two. An alternative option might be doing 4 of a slightly cheaper tire. Just check reviews to make sure the cheaper tire is not complete junk. There are some solid budget options out there. Do not expect them to handle and/or wear like the leaders in the segment, but they will get you to your destination safely.


Edit: Sorry for the repeated link @brian60 beat me to it by not being long winded :)
 
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Always properly rotate your tires every 5K miles.

Sent from another garage.
^^ :whs: Since when I got my winter setup used he has 3 icept tires and one rather brand new blizzak in the rear, I'm killing my fronts and replacing with 3 blizzaks while keeping an icept for a spare. Best to have 4 tires that are the same and as close as possible to the same tread, then as long as the tread is all the same rotate on time every time to keep them that way for the best safety/traction/performance. Some people neglect rotation and seriously compromise safety/performance.
 

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Repeating what has already been said, I worked at pepboys for 2 years, always put new tires on the back.

BUT. I will not do that on the ST or else I would go through 3-4 pairs of fronts for every back pair. Ill just rotate whichever set is better to the front every oil change (5k miles).
 
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OK, you guys are confused. You are apparently all under the misconception that new tires have better traction than worn tries. Tires that are 1/2 worn have less depth, hence less tread squirm and better traction. This is why people that are more pro than us shave their tread down for better traction when racing. Have you not noticed that when you get new tires they spin under acceleration more easily? Hence; new tires in front= understeer. New tires in back=oversteer.
 

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OK, you guys are confused. You are apparently all under the misconception that new tires have better traction than worn tries. Tires that are 1/2 worn have less depth, hence less tread squirm and better traction. This is why people that are more pro than us shave their tread down for better traction when racing. Have you not noticed that when you get new tires they spin under acceleration more easily? Hence; new tires in front= understeer. New tires in back=oversteer.
Yes you are partially right, the only thing you can get with older tires is heat cycling compromising the traction. Minus the heat cycling you are right about the tread squirm/traction.

EDIT: I'm assuming dry traction that is.
 

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OK, you guys are confused. You are apparently all under the misconception that new tires have better traction than worn tries. Tires that are 1/2 worn have less depth, hence less tread squirm and better traction. This is why people that are more pro than us shave their tread down for better traction when racing. Have you not noticed that when you get new tires they spin under acceleration more easily? Hence; new tires in front= understeer. New tires in back=oversteer.
While yes there is tread squirm...we are not incorrect...hence why we all quoted professional proof of why new goes on the back. Hydroplane resistance is more significant than tread squirm, which is exactly why the better tread goes in the back. Read the articles we linked, we aren't confused.
 

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For the purposes of hydroplaning perhaps, but how often do you drive that fast in rain THAT heavy? I'm with @Bluestangii, the fronts wear about twice as fast as the rears. If you put the new ones on the back the fronts will wear out in short order and you'll be replacing them. Plus, with a car that oversteers naturally do you really want tires with less dry traction in the rear? I mean it might be kind of fun for a while but I don't want to be going off the road backards.
Kind of a moot point talking about this anyways. When I have bought two tires they have always insisted they go on the front. But the last time I did that it was at Costco.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thank you everyone for your input! I'm very new to the performance vehicle game and I've definitely learned a lot from this thread.

I'm at the shop now and getting the new tires put on the rear to prevent "lift off oversteer" when going around corners as many of you have stated. The older tires will be placed on the front. I understand they will wear quicker, but I will buy 2 more new tires in another 5000 miles, and rotate accordingly.

Thanks again everyone.
 

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For the purposes of hydroplaning perhaps, but how often do you drive that fast in rain THAT heavy? I'm with @Bluestangii, the fronts wear about twice as fast as the rears. If you put the new ones on the back the fronts will wear out in short order and you'll be replacing them. Plus, with a car that oversteers naturally do you really want tires with less dry traction in the rear? I mean it might be kind of fun for a while but I don't want to be going off the road backards.
Kind of a moot point talking about this anyways. When I have bought two tires they have always insisted they go on the front. But the last time I did that it was at Costco.
Doesn't take heavy rain or a lot of speed. Newer tires will have greater wet weather traction altogether.
 

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For the purposes of hydroplaning perhaps, but how often do you drive that fast in rain THAT heavy? I'm with @Bluestangii, the fronts wear about twice as fast as the rears. If you put the new ones on the back the fronts will wear out in short order and you'll be replacing them. Plus, with a car that oversteers naturally do you really want tires with less dry traction in the rear? I mean it might be kind of fun for a while but I don't want to be going off the road backards.
Kind of a moot point talking about this anyways. When I have bought two tires they have always insisted they go on the front. But the last time I did that it was at Costco.
I'd rather have negligible amount of dry traction reduction in the rear and BETTER wet traction in the rear than the other way around. It's already proven that it is DEFINITELY safer to put new in the rear, by professionals mind you.

Thank you everyone for your input! I'm very new to the performance vehicle game and I've definitely learned a lot from this thread.

I'm at the shop now and getting the new tires put on the rear to prevent "lift off oversteer" when going around corners as many of you have stated. The older tires will be placed on the front. I understand they will wear quicker, but I will buy 2 more new tires in another 5000 miles, and rotate accordingly.

Thanks again everyone.
Sounds like a great plan, good call. Especially the buying 2 new tires in 5,000 miles idea, that way you'll be right on time for your first rotation anyway and you can just swap them accordingly. Just remember depending on if you have directional tires or not to rotate them properly.

Doesn't take heavy rain or a lot of speed. Newer tires will have greater wet weather traction altogether.
Correct, I've had several family members hydroplane going 5 below the speed limit on a bad section of road 10 minutes from me where they live. Plus, PA guys who have traveled interstate 322 out of Harrisburg going north know how bad that road is even if you are 10 below the speed limit. Water pooling in the ancient road surface grooves lol
 

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Ok, I admit defeat to the "misled" majority. :p That doesn't change how I feel about it.
 
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