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2016 ST2, Absolute Black, Turbosmart BPV, Dual OCCs, Innovative RMM, JBR Intake & SS Arm, 245/40R18
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Pennzoil is my regular brand synthetic favorite, but I'm not a fanboy of any one better brand.
Wife's 4runner has Swepco 90w in the rear diff and Sheaffer 75w90 in the front diff at the moment.
Some of it is just cost/availability when I need it.
I do stay away from the one(s) that remind me of Amway, tho 馃槈馃槢馃榿
 

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2017 Kona Blue ST1
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Discussion Starter #22
Look up DLC (diamond like carbon) treatments. I believe that Nissan is actively researching this for production use. I've personally used a moly based coatings on piston side skirts but this stuff is a whole different animal altogether.
 
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2016 ST2, Absolute Black, Turbosmart BPV, Dual OCCs, Innovative RMM, JBR Intake & SS Arm, 245/40R18
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Look up DLC (diamond like carbon) treatments. I believe that Nissan is actively researching this for production use. I've personally used a moly based coatings on piston side skirts but this stuff is a whole different animal altogether.
DLC sounds like awesome stuff 馃槑

It seems high end motor builds can use it at this point.
 

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2016 ST1, FBO, GTX2867R Gen2 .64-AR, Spec stage 2 clutch, Quaife LSD, Fortune Auto 500 coil-overs.
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I haven't heard of them before either. As the new standard becomes more widely available in different viscosity levels due to the increasing popularity of DI engines it my hope that cost for this oil goes down.

It was the detergent topic and the increased oil to fuel saturation with the higher ethanol contents that really peaked my interest.
I also noted he mentioned one cause of LSPI was a deficiency in fuel vaporization which is a common problem of GDI engines.
I'm wondering if the LSPI risk of increased fuel to oil ratio caused by utilizing e85 would be offset by auxilary port injection because of it's propensity to encourage fuel vaporization?.
 

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2016 ST2, Absolute Black, Turbosmart BPV, Dual OCCs, Innovative RMM, JBR Intake & SS Arm, 245/40R18
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I also noted he mentioned one cause of LSPI was a deficiency in fuel vaporization which is a common problem of GDI engines.
I'm wondering if the LSPI risk of increased fuel to oil ratio caused by utilizing e85 would be offset by auxilary port injection because of it's propensity to encourage fuel vaporization?.
Good question, the comments were methanol in general, not aux specifically.
I would guess it also makes a difference how much methanol you're running, and if injected via port or throttle body spacer.


Looking at Driven's website, they mention molybdenum in their formula, NOT magnesium.
Shop By Product - Direct Injection Oils

However, magnesium is in detergent additives and better than calcium or sodium based detergents according to driven. Sources of Magnesium

Mazda also added moly to their brand oil. I assumed for wear with decreased bearing area in skyactive DI motors, but perhaps more for reducing chance of preignition similar to driven?

$15 a qt is pretty rich for driven product on a stock daily ST.

I may go for an initial ceratec treatment followed by moly most changes, then another ceratec every 25-30,000 mi.
I used the moly liqui-moly additive in the Mazda 3 DI with Pennzoil Platinum, both of which are easy to find and more affordable.

Guess I need to look into others UOA to see if any normal brand oil is onto calcium and sodium detergent reduction.
 

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Anybody try the newer ceramic snake oil additive? It's supposed to coat.

Then there's the plasma spray stuff, more for wear again. I think some high end engines were using it on cylinder bores, and Mazda used it in rotary engines?

I don't think the earlier Slick 50 PTFE additive and similar lived up to the hype.
I began using Ceratec at a little over 16k, hoping to reduce wear, and my ST seems to like it. The active compound is hexagonal boron nitride, and there is a fairly extensive body of literature on its use as a lubricant additive, where it shines more as an anti-wear ingredient than as a friction reducer. This link is from an older publication (demonstrating that it has been studied for a few years already): Boron nitride as a lubricant additive

I've used the MoS2 once as well, but am a little leery of using it on a regular basis as an additive to the oil I use, which was not formulated with this additive in mind. Liqui-Moly oil costs more than I am willing to spend, but that's what I would use if I wanted to run molybdenum disulfide in my engine on a regular basis, since it was formulated as a tribological package.

Mazda used a bonding process to coat the trochoidal track surfaces of their rotor housings with PTFE--teflon, but not anything like a Slick 50 treatment. Teflon has been used for years by some manufacturers to coat piston skirts to reduce scuffing and wear during break-in.
 

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I began using Ceratec at a little over 16k, hoping to reduce wear, and my ST seems to like it. The active compound is hexagonal boron nitride, and there is a fairly extensive body of literature on its use as a lubricant additive, where it shines more as an anti-wear ingredient than as a friction reducer. This link is from an older publication (demonstrating that it has been studied for a few years already): Boron nitride as a lubricant additive

I've used the MoS2 once as well, but am a little leery of using it on a regular basis as an additive to the oil I use, which was not formulated with this additive in mind. Liqui-Moly oil costs more than I am willing to spend, but that's what I would use if I wanted to run molybdenum disulfide in my engine on a regular basis, since it was formulated as a tribological package.

Mazda used a bonding process to coat the trochoidal track surfaces of their rotor housings with PTFE--teflon, but not anything like a Slick 50 treatment. Teflon has been used for years by some manufacturers to coat piston skirts to reduce scuffing and wear during break-in.
PS鈥擸es, Mazda did use a hard chrome plating on the trochoidal tracks prior to the Teflon coating, some chromium alloy with molybdenum and maybe nickel included. Motorcycles and cars have had the same or similar treatment in cylinder bores (some of the two stroke motocross bikes I used to ride, and Porsche cylinders, etc.). You can鈥檛 bore them, but they do last a long time unless abused.

My appreciation, by the way, to members who take the time to provide useful information, tips, and diy guides. I learn a lot from this forum.
 
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