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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
After some 55K miles, the stock brakes on my daily driven 2013 ST are due for a change. This thread will document the installation and results.

I'll be using:

- Carbotech 1521 pads (Thanks Oakos!)
- Pentosin DOT 4 LV brake fluid (available locally at O'Reilly's Auto Parts)
- Full Flush with Motive Power Bleeder
- New stock brake rotors
- New brake pad clips and sliders
- TCE stainless lines (already installed)

As of March 6, 2017, the parts have been ordered, so I'm creating this thread and reserving the first three posts. I expect to do the installation within the next few weeks; if you have any questions before I do the install, please PM me and I'll be sure to address them during the actual install and bed-in.

Best regards to all,
Mark

Goals
This car is a daily driver driven spiritedly, not abusively. As a former PRO rally car driver, I am used to left-foot braking and wanted to be able to do so with this car, especially in winter, rain and other slippy conditions. The 2013 (smaller rotors) came with high-dust pads that have a strong initial bite and fairly low pedal effort, especially at colder temps -- probably one of the worst stock setups for left-foot braking I have encountered!

I wanted a setup that required more pedal effort for a given amount of torque; which would be linear in braking at various temperatures, and; which would exhibit superior brake modulation characteristics.

I don't track the car and have only autocrossed the car once, so aiming for lower unsprung weight, added brake cooling etc. are not what I needed. I also don't mind (well... not too much!) the brake dust from the stock pads.

And I'll be honest: I didn't want to pay a lot of money for capacity I would never use. So basically I took the money some others have spent on very nice rotors and "invested" in the Carbotech pads, which net-net are almost $100 (front and rear together) more expensive than the EBC/Hawk/Stoptech competing high-performance street pads.


Why Carbotech Bobcat 1521?
The 1521 pads' torque characteristics are fairly constant from ambient to quite hot, unlike my experience (on a different platform) with Hawk HPS pads which seem require a little more pedal effort when cold but work great when warmed up some. The 1521 also have excellent modulation control (required for left-foot braking) and will not reach a point where they "grab", forcing the ABS to kick in. As a side benefit, they last a long time and are low dusting. The only downside to these pads is that they absolutely have to be broken in according to the directions.


Why Petosin Dot 4 LV?
The Ford PM-20 brake fluid is a DOT 4 LV (Low Viscosity) brake fluid that meets FMVSS DOT 4 and ISO4925 Class 6 standards. Maine is cold in the winter, and changing the viscosity of the brake fluid (at any temperature) impacts how the ABS and torque vectoring works. I didn't want to do that, and none of the popular brake fluid replacements (e.g. Motul 6xx series and Super ATE TYP 200) meet the DOT 4 LV spec. The Pentosin fluid is also the only DOT 4 LV fluid listed in Florida's approved fluids list (not that that matters to some), indicating Pentosin jumped through some hoops on this product. In the past with German cars, I have had excellent results with Pentosin fluids, so I was keen to try it on the ST.



Tools and Supplies Required



Pad and Rotor Removal



Caliper Preparation and Slider Replacement
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Reserved for installation Part 2.

Reassembly
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Reserved for bed-in procedure and driving impressions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Looking forward to your hearing your thoughts/results of this setup.
Me too! All the parts arrived earlier this week. Not sure I'll have the time to do it this weekend but if not next weekend for sure.

All the best,
Mark
 

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I used the bob cats and they are great. Every thing you mention about their performance is true. I have run Motul and Project Mu fluid all winter in Canada for 5 years with no issues so go with whatever floats your boat fluid wise. Essex has a great video on bed in procedure. There is a how to change your brake pads tutorial on this site thats great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I used the bob cats and they are great. Every thing you mention about their performance is true. I have run Motul and Project Mu fluid all winter in Canada for 5 years with no issues so go with whatever floats your boat fluid wise. Essex has a great video on bed in procedure. There is a how to change your brake pads tutorial on this site thats great.
All Dot 4/DOT 5.1 brake fluid is pretty low viscosity to begin with, so I really don't know how much thinner the LV is over the non-LV. And even so, I don't know how much that viscosity difference would impact how torque vectoring and ABS react either.

Nice to hear though that regular DOT 4 is working OK a little farther North than here, and I'm prepared to have been concerned about something not very significant at the end of the day!

Thanks for your comments on this and on the Bobcats!

All the best,
Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
How have the pads been working out for you?
Well, as you can see I'm behind on completing my writeup but the pads are fantastic for my daily use. Carbotech pride themselves on modulation control and that has proven to be the case here. My tune has brake pedal throttle cut disabled, so I am able to left-foot brake comfortably.

I've tested repeated aggressive stops and the modulation works great at the limit as well as at lower braking pressures. No fade either.

Yards better than the stock pads. Better than other cars I've driven with Hawk HPS pads, but that's not necessarily a fair apples-to-apples comparison.

Hope that helps,
Mark
 

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Reserved for bed-in procedure and driving impressions.
Hi Mark, for the bed-in procedure they're not like Carbotech's racing pads. Last I spoke to them about bedding in the 1521's they said just 300 street miles, nothing intense like their racing compounds. How'd you bed in yours?

Awesome thread concept BTW. There's not a whole lot of feedback I've come across for these pads on this platform.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yes, I saw that there is no documented bedding in procedure for the 1521s on the web site too. I bedded them in using a "light" version of their race pad bed-in procedure; pretty much how I've bedded in most performance-street pads over the years.

First I did a few light and easy 50mph to zero stops, to get just a little heat into the pads and score up the rotors. I then parked the car to make sure I was getting full contact on the rotor faces. (I had a new pad once that wasn't milled parallel to the backing plate...)

I then did three more aggressive 50-30mph slow downs in quick succession to generate some mid-range heat and then drove for a few miles barely using the brakes at all to cool them down. Parked the car and examined the rotors to make sure wear was reasonably even; no hot spots from color gradations, etc.

Finally, I did three more 50-20mph-wish-I-had-a-Hans-Device very aggressive stops, trying to modulate at impending wheel lockup, and then again drove for a few miles barely using the brakes at all to cool them down. Done.

The trick in my experience to bedding in brake pads is to get them warm enough to start to have the "glue" holding the compound together at the rotor face hot enough to evaporate some. With new pads, if you do that too fast, you glaze the pads as too much glue makes it to the surface of the pad too quickly. The volatility of the "glue" varies by pad compound (and it's not technically correct I know to call it "glue", although it helps me to think of it that way...), so that impacts the aggressiveness of the bedding in procedure. If you don't get enough "glue" evaporated as part of the bedding in process, you risk glazing the pads when you do go to do some harsh stops later.

Hope that helps,
Mark
 
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