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Installed my new set of NGK-LTR7IX-11 plugs this morning. They all came gapped at .034" and I regapped to .027" and reset my KAM afterwards. I have a 13' that I got in Sep of 12' with roughly 7900 miles with Torries 93B tune. Instantly I felt a much smoother idle and initial roll into the throttle. Didn't really notice any extra additional performance, per se, but I did notice a few MPG increase over about 60 miles than the previous stock plugs. Also when fully warmed up I notice that the oil temperature gauge, as expected with a +1 cooler range, is a little lower than with the stock plug. Normally when fully warmed up with the stock plug it is just a tiny tad below ½ way. With the 1 step colder plugs it never got above 3/8's. Took some pics of the factory plugs. They looked pretty good, with normal carbon. They were ALL however gapped at roughly .020" which might explain the sometimes weird idle or slow initial roll into throttle I've been feeling.

NGK_LTR7IX-11BOX.jpg
Stock_plug.jpg
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Stock_Plug_in_gapper.jpg
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Changed out my factory plugs yesterday. They were all capped about 28/29 and looked really good at 14k miles.
 

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Installed my new set of NGK-LTR7IX-11 plugs this morning. They all came gapped at .034" and I regapped to .027" and reset my KAM afterwards. I have a 13' that I got in Sep of 12' with roughly 7900 miles with Torries 93B tune. Instantly I felt a much smoother idle and initial roll into the throttle. Didn't really notice any extra additional performance, per se, but I did notice a few MPG increase over about 60 miles than the previous stock plugs. Also when fully warmed up I notice that the oil temperature gauge, as expected with a +1 cooler range, is a little lower than with the stock plug. Normally when fully warmed up with the stock plug it is just a tiny tad below ½ way. With the 1 step colder plugs it never got above 3/8's. Took some pics of the factory plugs. They looked pretty good, with normal carbon. They were ALL however gapped at roughly .020" which might explain the sometimes weird idle or slow initial roll into throttle I've been feeling.
Nice! I bought the same set of plugs and will be putting them in soon. Glad you're getting good results so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Nice! I bought the same set of plugs and will be putting them in soon. Glad you're getting good results so far.
Yea I'm amazed at the difference with only 8K miles on the original plugs. I literally cannot feel the car idling - plus the increase in mileage and cooler running engine should be nice to boot too.
 

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Why would you use Anti-sieze? The plugs should never sieze. I've never experienced that in any car I've ever owned.

Just remember though, aluminum head, very little torque required to seat the plugs.

I think the manual lists is as 8-10lb/ft or something tiny like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I did not use anti-seize compount. I basically hand tightened with socket and extension, then gave a tiny tiny bit with the ratchet. It took significantly more effort to remove them, as they seemed to be torqued REALLY high. As stated you don't need elbow grease to tighten - just snug
 

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Anti-seize on the threads can help protect the AL threads when removing them at a later point. Not needed, but is preference for some. I always use it and dielectric grease on the boost.

Also when fully warmed up I notice that the oil temperature gauge, as expected with a +1 cooler range, is a little lower than with the stock plug. Normally when fully warmed up with the stock plug it is just a tiny tad below ½ way. With the 1 step colder plugs it never got above 3/8's.
FWIW, your oil temperature is not going to change going with colder plugs.
 

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Why did you go step colder? Are you running higher boost?

Most tuners don't recommend it unless you pushing the limit on your turbo and not using ethanol/methanol which would help reduce cylinder temps.

Check your plugs in a few hundred miles. If they're black you're getting an incomplete burn which is no good.
 

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From what I gathered from a lot of the responses in that thread, as well as the original thread is that people's stock plugs were all gapped too wide.
That could be part of it. Don't think anyone has seen issues with blowout though.
 

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Im running the same plugs now at a .028 gap! its prime! but my factory ones when removed looked horrible and also gaped at .035. That was 21k miles
 

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Hard to understand the variation in stock plug gaps. I just swapped for the NGK and my originals and another car too which were gapped at about .028
 

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Anti-seize on the threads can help protect the AL threads when removing them at a later point. Not needed, but is preference for some. I always use it and dielectric grease on the boost.



FWIW, your oil temperature is not going to change going with colder plugs.
I know this post is old but a quick comment, using anti-seize on ngk plugs is not recommended. It allows for over torqing and also the ngk plugs come with an anti - seize coated on the threads.
 

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I know this post is old but a quick comment, using anti-seize on ngk plugs is not recommended. It allows for over torqing and also the ngk plugs come with an anti - seize coated on the threads.
Correct, and neither NGK, nor Denso recommends it.

I cover all this info in the "Spark plugs" sticky.
 

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I know this post is old but a quick comment, using anti-seize on ngk plugs is not recommended. It allows for over torqing and also the ngk plugs come with an anti - seize coated on the threads.
Agreed, and when using anti-seize or any other lubricant on the threads, you want to reduce you torque target. If done correctly, I still stand by that it's okay to use, but yes you need to tighten them to a lower torque and be very careful to keep any off the electrode, insulator, etc.
 

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Why would you use Anti-sieze? The plugs should never sieze. I've never experienced that in any car I've ever owned.

Just remember though, aluminum head, very little torque required to seat the plugs.

I think the manual lists is as 8-10lb/ft or something tiny like that.
 
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