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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Before I start, PLEASE do not post any "thanks" or "you're so awesome, can I have your babies?" messages :). It means a lot to me when people do post those things because it lets me know that what I've done is appreciated, but please direct posts like that to my build thread or just PM me directly. I wish to keep this thread as clean as possible so that people who are researching this LSD don't have to dig through a bunch of useless posts to find useful information. If you have a question directly related to the LSD installation then please feel free to post in this thread! If you wish to just show your appreciation, then simply hit the "Like" button at the bottom of this post. I wrote this install instructions as a basic guide to help other ST owners install the Quaife LSD by themselves. At the time of writing this installation instructions, there has not been many people who have installed the LSD. To the best of my knowledge, I'm the first person in the U.S. to have installed the LSD in his own personal ST. I don't recommend everyone to do this, but if you're dead set on doing it yourself, and you've got the necessary tools and mechanical know-how then this write-up should help you in your journey of installing it. I will try my best to be as detailed with these instructions as possible, but I may forget a things or leave things out because they should be obvious. Please don't use this guide as your only source of information to aid in your installation. Please do plenty of your own research! Furthermore, take into consideration that you car could be nonoperational for longer than expected. With a project like this, you never know what may go wrong. You may break something important and need to order the part that you broke. You need to plan this project down to every minor detail!

[HR][/HR]
Edited 5/30/14:
The video How-To

I will keep the previous written/picture based how-to below for reference/part numbers.
[HR][/HR]

Here are the parts necessary to complete this install:
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----Non-ford parts & major tools:
-High temp grease
-High temp anaerobic gasket maker
-High-strength Loctite
-1.75" Exhaust clamp, U-bolt style.
-Aluminum bearing installer
-Aluminum round stock, 0.5" wide, 3-4" long
-Brake bleeder kit
-Hub removal kit
-Transmission jack
-Engine support bar
-Feeler gauges
----Minor tools
-32mm hub socket or deep-well socket
-T55 Torx bit
-Hard plastic/rubber hammer
-Crow-bar
-Vise
-Propane torch or heat gun
-Torque wrench(es) with capacities from 8 to 109ft/lbs
-Various sockets, ratches, wrenches, screwdrivers, and misc. tools that you should already have.
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----Ford parts:
(2) CV6Z1S177A - Shaft seal assembly
(2) F7RZ4221AC - Roller-bearing & Race
(10) W700427S300 - Bolts for ring-gear
(1) W500361S442 - Bolt for transmission mount
(1) CV6Z3B477A - Hub nut
(2) W520102S442 - Nuts for RH halfshaft bearing retainer
(1) YS4Z3N324AA - Bearing retainer for RH halfshaft
(1) 4S7Z4B422A - Circlip for LH halfshaft
(2) W715491S442 - Bolt for lower arm / knuckle
(2) W520415S442 - Nut for lower arm / knuckle
(2) XT-11-QDC - Tranmission fluid, Motorcraft® Dual Clutch
(2) PM-20 - Brake fluid, Motorcraft® DOT 4 LV High Performance

----Shims:
3S7Z4067AA - 1.44mm
91ZZ4067BA - 1.5mm
91ZZ4067CA - 1.6mm
91ZZ4067DA - 1.7mm
91ZZ4067EA - 1.8mm
91ZZ4067FA - 1.9mm
91ZZ4067GA - 2.0mm
3S7Z4067AB - 2.08mm
91ZZ4067HA - 2.1mm
91ZZ4067JA - 2.2mm
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Let's talk about these parts and tools:

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Bearing installer:
The bearing installer absolutely necessary for this installation if you're doing it all by yourself. You'll need to have someone with a lathe to machine this for you, assuming you don't have a lathe. The bearing tool will look like this:



This whole piece was machined out of a 2" piece of aluminum round stock. It MUST be aluminum to prevent damage to the bearings! Also note that it doesn't have to be this tall. The whole piece could be 1 to 2" tall. If you cannot find someone to make you a bearing installer, you can always try using this. As a very last resort you could try finding a shop to press the bearings on for you.

Edit to add: @Stasiu used a 36mm kobalt socket to successfully hammer the bearing onto the LSD:

Excellent idea @Stasiu!
If you go the socket route as above, you will probably still want to pick up a small piece of scrap aluminum to act as a soft punch tool to insert the races.

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Aluminum round stock, 0.5" wide, 3-4" long



Do not confuse this with the bearing installer above. I included this as more of an optional tool. This will make hammering the races in easier for you. During my install I used my bearing tool to hammer them in as shown in this picture:



I simply put the edge of the tool up against the edge of the race and hit it with a hammer. This will not damage the race, but it will damage the tool. Using a smaller piece of round-stock that is about 1/2" wide as a "punch" would have been a little easier I think. This tool is optional if you have had a bearing tool made, but it will be necessary if you had a shop press the bearings on for you.

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Brake bleeder kit
Absolutely necessary for bleeding your clutch. Do not try it the "old school" way. My local autopart store had a kit for loaning. Do not give up on the search for this tool. If none of the local autoparts stores have it, travel to the next closest city and try to find one. If you still can't find one, you will have to buy one online.

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Hub removal kit
Necessary to prevent damage to your halfshaft and hub. With this tool you basically "push" the end portion of the halfshaft out of the hub. I found this at the same autopart store as a loaner tool. As a last resort you could try taking the hub nut almost off, and then taking a hammer to it, but there's a good possibility you could damage the threads of the halfshaft. If you do that, you just screwed yourself and you will need to be buying a $120 halfshaft.

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Transmission jack
I had a couple people tell me that they have dropped some FWD transmissions without a transmission jack, but I really would recommend using one. I would even recommend using one if you had an extra person helping you. Don't try to benchpress this transmission, it's just not a good idea for your safety or the safety of the transmission. I bought a cheap transmission jack from Harbor Freight. Try borrowing one from a friend or an autoparts store.

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Engine support bar
This came in very handy. To remove the transmission you will have to remove the rear motor mount and transmission mount, leaving only one mount holding the engine from falling to the ground. Physics just don't allow that one motor mount to hold the engine up, something has to support the engine in place. I bought an engine support bar which basically is a bar that runs across the top side of your engine. You use chains to tie onto the two engine lift brackets. I would not recommend using a jack on the bottom side of the engine as it is highly unsafe, so if you go that route then good luck to you. I bought my support bar from Harbor Freight. Try borrowing one from a friend or an autoparts store.

Suggested by pmaltinsky: You can also construct a make-shift engine support bar with some 2x4's.

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Feeler gauges
This will be used to measure the preload of your LSD. Absolutely necessary. They can be bought at an autoparts stores, but I bought a big 32 piece set from amazon.

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1.75" Exhaust clamp, U-bolt style.
This will be used to install the RH halfshaft in place. You can find these in just about any autoparts store in their exhaust section for a few bucks. In addition to this part/tool, you will need a piece of rubber or leather that is around 1" wide or more and no less than 5.75" long. I bought a cheap bicycle innertube. You will be wrapping the shaft with this material and then putting the U-clamp around it. The material is there to protect the shaft from being scraped up.

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Shims
These are absolutely necessary. In the end, you will only need one, but you'll need one to act as a measuring shim, and then one as the final shim that you will place in your transmission. I bought one of each so I would have the full set. I did not want to break apart my transmission, measure the preload amount, and then have to order the correct sized shim while waiting around for it to be shipped. You might want to see if your local Ford dealership can source these, but I doubt they will be able to get them in a reasonable time.

*Note: Read section 5.02.5 before purchasing any shims.

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Crow-bar
You'll want to use a crowbar with a claw that isn't too thick or wide. Something like these two will work:


The first one is a Stanley 17" Ripping Chisel. The second is a Stanley/Bostitch 17 3/4" Crowbar. Please keep in mind while selecting a crowbar that you won't be using the goose-neck portion of it, you'll be using the straight end which will need a claw. The teeth of the claw cannot be overly thick or it will not fit into the slit of the lower control arm (thanks ST3 4 ME for pointing all this out.) Also, I suppose it doesn't need to have a claw if the end portion is not too wide.
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Okay, so now that you've got an idea of the tools necessary for this installation, and you haven't been scared away, let's continue!


1) Top-side disassembly

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1.01 - Airbox removal


After that, you should be able to pull the airbox up. It is basically "snapped" into three round fittings. You can see where they are here:



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1.02 - Removal of the battery and battery box.

Remove the dust cover off of the battery. It is split in half and the two halves should come out. Disconnect the ground first. Let the cable rest on a piece of plastic.



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1.03 - Cowl panel removal - Only necessary if using engine support bar



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1.04 - Intake piping removal - Only necessary if using engine support bar
I didn't take any pictures of the intake removal because I have a Cobb intake, but the proceedure is simple enough. At this point you should already have the intake piping disconnected from the airbox, so proceed to disconnecting it from the turbo. Just loosen the worm clamp and it should pop off. After that, the intake pipe should also be secured to part of the engine by a bolt. Remove that bolt and everything should come apart. If I remember right, the stock intake piping was in multiple pieces. It may make it easier to break those apart also during this process. Cover the opening to the turbo to prevent dirt and such from entering. I used a sandwich bag and the worm clamp to cover it.

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1.05 - Starter motor removal



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1.06 - Shifter linkages



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1.07 - Misc. top-side parts



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2) Bottom-side disassembly

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2.01 - Jacking up the car
Before we start with removing parts on the bottom side, we need to discuss jacking up the car. Everything written in this how-to has been assumed that the person will be using jack stands and not a hydraulic lift. You first will need to consider how high you will need to jack up the car. Once you are jacked up, you will still need to be able to reach the transmission from the top-side of the car through the engine bay as you are maneuvering the transmission down to the ground. So don't jack the car up too high. At the same time, you definitely do not want it too low or you will not be able to pull out. When I pulled my transmission I had to take it off the transmission jack so that it would clear part of the car's frame. Next thing to figure out before you jack the car up is how are you planning on getting the left-hand axel nut off? You have two options.

First option, if you are doing this by yourself, you can jack the car up, remove the wheel, remove the center cap from the wheel, reinstall the wheel with the center cap removed so that you can access the axel nut, lower the car down just far enough that the tire is touching the ground and will prevent the wheel from spinning, and then break the axel nut loose. You do not want to have too much weight on the wheel as you do this! You want just barely enough that the tire will bite into the ground and prevent it from turning. Once broken loose, you would then jack the car all the way up and continue to remove the wheel, and later on when it is time to remove the axel nut, you will remove it the rest of the way.

Second option, if you have someone else to help you, you can jack the car up, and when the time comes to remove the axel nut, you will have the other person apply the breaks as you break the axel nut loose. Using an impact wrench while doing this would be the prefered method, but using a breaker bar will work also.

There's nothing really left to discuss except safety. You will be having your car in a lifted position for an extended period of time. Chock your wheels! Please always use a secondary safety. I normally have two jack stands as the primary, then a jack in the middle of the car for the secondary, and then as a third I will throw my wheels underneath my car. My cousin died while he was working under his car because his jack gave out. I think about that every time before I go underneath my car. NEVER allow yourself to become complacent. If you walk away from your car for a period of time and you come back to get underneath it, double check all of your safety devices before going underneath.


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2.01 - Remove splash guard
Don't really need any pictures for this one. If you have removed your splash guard as many times as I have you probably hate it just as much as I do. I wish Ford would have designed it to be a quick disconnect.


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2.02 - Drain transmission



You'll want to slowly remove the plug. Since the oil will be coming out at an angle, you probably don't want to fully remove it right away either. I removed mine just enough to allow the fluid to come out as I kept ahold of it in my hand. Oh yeah, and don't forget to have an oil pan ready to catch the escaping fluid. After it has drained, replace the plug and torque to 25ft/lbs.

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2.03 - Remove rear motor mount
I'm not going to get detailed with this because if you're installing an LSD, you probably already have experience with swapping our rear motor mount. If you haven't, I think you're doing the wrong mod first.



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2.04 - Remove intercooler piping
I didn't get any pictures of this because I have a Cobb FMIC. You can refer to Cobb's installation instructions on how to remove the stock IC piping. You're just wanting to remove the warm side piping, i.e. the piping coming from the turbo going into the intercooler. If you look, you'll see that it'll be in the way of dropping the transmission. Cover the openings to prevent dirt from entering them.

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2.05 - Remove LH fender splash shield
I didn't get any pictures of this but it's simple enough. It's the plastic splash shield that's in your left hand wheel-well. It is retained by a bunch of the plastic push-pins and a few torx screws.

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2.06 - Remove LH axel/hub nut



You may need to use a little bit of penetrating oil on the nut to help it break free. Be careful not to get any on your rotors.

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2.07 - Disconnect LH brake line



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2.08 - Remove LH lower arm from wheel knuckle
First, you'll have to remove the knuckle bot and nut:



Now, let's separate the lower arm from the knuckle:



You may need to use some rubber-safe penetrating oil where the ball joint is connected to the knuckle. Do not use any penetrating oil unless you know if it is safe on rubber. You do not want to damage the boot on ball joint. While prying, be careful not to hurt yourself. The crow bar may slip! The best method I used to separate the lower arm from the knuckle was a fast up and down motion. Brute force prying did not seem like it worked. If I kept rapidly moving the lower arm up and down it seemed like it helped the most. Keep momentum going. It will feel like it binds up as soon as you slow down. Also, you may want to try turning the whole knuckle assembly one way or another to get a better position with your crow bar.

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2.09 - Install Hub puller on LH hub



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2.10 - LH halfshaft removal
Once you are done with the hub puller, go ahead and remove it from the hub. Before we pull this axel from the transmission, you need to know that Ford doesn't want you to bend the inner CV joint more than 18° and 45° for the outer. The outer CV joint will be the one closest to the hub, and inner will be the one closest to the transmission. You can damage these joints if you bend them past what they were designed for. Tie the outer section of the axel up so you can focus more on getting it pulled from the transmission. Make sure you have your oil pan on the floor to catch any fluid that may drip. While pulling the axel from the transmission, keep in mind that the shaft is actually shoved into the differential, and that there is a circlip at the end of the shaft that "holds" it in the differential. You'll need to apply a little bit of force to remove it. I carefully used a crowbar between the transmission case and the CV's metal case to pry it out. BE CAREFUL!



Once the shaft pops out, go ahead and remove it from the car and place it in a safe place. Remember not to allow the joints to bend much. You can remove the circlip from the end of the shaft and discard it. You will be installing a new one before you reinstall the shaft.

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2.11 - Remove RH lower arm from wheel knuckle
Repeat step 2.08 on the RH side to seperate lower arm from knuckle.

Also remove brake line like in 2.07.

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2.12 - RH halfshaft removal
With the RH halfshaft you will only need to pull it out from the differential. You will not need to remove it from the wheel hub. You'll separate the lower arm from the knuckle to give you a little extra room to pull the halfshaft out.



Once the bearing retaining bracket is removed, the halfshaft is ready to be pulled out. Before you pull it out though, you will want to tie it up with something. I ended up using a strap from a carry-bag and strapped it to my downpipe. Once you have it tied off, go ahead and pull the halfshaft out enough so that you can move it off to the side a little. Remember not to over bend the inner joint! Be careful not to damage the splines at the end of the shaft. Be sure to have an oil pan ready to catch any dripping fluid.



If for some odd reason you can't get it to come out by hand, refer to the U-clamp method in section 8.04

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2.13 - Transmission bolt removal



The only thing holding your transmission up right now is the two bolts that you didn't remove, and the transmission mount.

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2.14 - Position transmission jack in place
I didn't take any pictures of putting the jack in place, but it's quite simple. You can see where the two halves of the transmission join together. I put the jack centered with this, then strapped it down. If you look at the transmission you will also see that the bottom side isn't level with the ground, it's kinda rotated a bit, so I used a small block between the jack's platform and transmission to help aid with this. Sorry about not having pictures. I was pretty focused on what all I was doing at the time to think about snapping some pictures.

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2.15 - Install engine support bar



Not shown in the pictures above are the two chains you would use to loop through the engine's lift hooks. Be sure to have them nice and tight, especially the one that connects to the lift hook in the back. Make sure the legs of the support bar will not shift around. On the passenger side it may want to slip down against the coolant tank.

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2.16 - Remove transmission mount



After removing the main bolt, lift up on the transmission mount to remove it. Underneath it there will be a mounting bracket bolted to the transmission case with 3 bolts. Go ahead and remove this so it isn't in your way while you are dropping the transmission. Your engine is now only supported by the support bar and the passenger side engine mount.

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2.17 - Remove the two remaining transmission bolts
Those two bolts that you didn't remove during step 2.13 can now be removed. Double check your transmission jack before doing so!

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2.18 - Drop the transmission
So, now for the fun part. Dropping the transmission, just not *literally* dropping it. You may damage transmission, or worse, damage your floor :D. Pull the transmission roughly 2-3" directly away from the engine. Do not move the transmission in any other direction other than directly away from the engine. You don't want to damage the clutch or the fingers of the pressure plate. Once it has cleared the pressure plate, you can then start maneuvering it down. I had to rotate the transmission clockwise just a little:



Then I moved the whole transmission towards the front of the car.



Be careful not to damage the slave cylinder. It's plastic and plastic vs metal has a very bad outcome. The frame shown in the picture will be in your way a little and you'll have to maneuver around it. You should be able to begin lowering the transmission at this point. You may have had to lower it slightly earlier, but there's so many variables at this point it's hard to tell you to "do x and y will happen." Once you have the transmission lowered to the ground, you can begin trying to pull it out from the left side of the wheel hub. You may have to move the hub over a bit to make room. You might also want to try disconnecting the left half of your front bumper to make room. Refer to Cobb's FMIC instructions on how to remove your front bumper. You might also want to move the ECU out of the way. It's bolted in place with 3 bolts. I never had to do any of this while removing the transmission, but I did remove the front bumper and moved the ECU over to help with reinstalling it. You may also need to remove the transmission from the jack at this point and pull it out by hand. Be careful not to damage the transmission if you do.

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3) Breaking apart the transmission
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3.01 - Slave cylinder removal



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3.02 - Remove case bolts
Before you remove these bolts, know that you'll always want the input shaft facing up like in the picture shown above in 3.01 and in the picture below. Don't lay the transmission on its side once we start taking the bolts out.



There should be around 22 bolts in total holding the transmission together. There will also be some on the inside of the bellhousing:



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3.03 - Transmission separation



Start hitting up lightly with a plastic or rubber hammer on these areas around the whole transmission. You may have to hit harder, but start off slow. Watch the gap between the two halves. You don't want one side coming up more than the other. Keep working its way up until you can pull it off by hand. While pulling it off, be sure to pull it straight up. Be careful with the input shaft's seal. You can damage it during this step. Once the top half is removed, flip the top halve upside down. There is two plastic pieces on the bottom side that you don't want to damage, so have them facing up for now. Do not attempt to flip the bottom half of the transmission upside-down or on its side!

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3.04 - Remove differential



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Continued in next post
 

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Discussion Starter #2
4) Differential/case prep

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4.01 - Remove ring-gear from stock differential



The ring-gear has 10 bolts securing it to the differential. You will need to remove 7 of these bolts. The 3 that you will keep you can break loose during this process. You'll want these three to form a simple "triangle" pattern. You'll be using these 3 bolts to tap the ring gear off of the differential. Once all bolts except the 3 have been removed, take the differential out of the vise and place the differential with the bolt heads facing up. You'll be resting the differential on the roller bearing but don't worry about that. You're not going to use the stock roller bearing. Back the 3 bolts out about two full turns. Use a hammer to lightly tap against the bolt heads. Go around in a circle hitting the bolt heads. The ring gear should start coming off. You may have to back the bolts out one or two more turns to get the ring-gear loose enough that it will fall off or will come off by hand. Once loose enough, go ahead and remove the 3 bolts. Just don't let the ring-gear fall down. You don't want to accidentially chip a tooth on it. There's no dentists for ring-gears! Discard the 3 bolts that you hammered on. Discard 4 of the remaining 7 bolts (save 3 bolts for installing ring gear)

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4.02 - Install ring-gear to LSD

Before installing the ring-gear to the new differential, be sure to clean the mating surfaces of any dirt or oil. After it is clean, use a very small amount of new transmission fluid on the mating surfaces. Use 3 of the old bolts and install them in a simple "triangle" pattern. Tighten them in an even manner, about 1/2 turn at a time. Be sure to keep an eye on it to make sure it's going on straight and you're not pulling the one side on more than the other. Torque all 3 of them to 61 ft/lbs, then use some sort of marker to mark them because you'll be removing them shortly. Now, begin installing the new bolts. Use high-strength loctite on the new bolts. Tighten them all in a star pattern (like you would the lug nuts on your wheels.) Once they're all tightened, remove the 3 old bolts and install new bolts with loctite in their place. Torque all bolts to 61 ft/lbs in a star pattern. Double check the torques on each one before completing this step and moving on!

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4.03 - Install bearings onto differential



Before installing the bearings, be sure that the sleeves on the LSD are clean and free of oil. You don't have to use any cleaners, just make sure to wipe away any dirt and oil. The new bearings will have a slight oil coating. Remove any excess oil from the mating surface of the bearing. The rollers can have oil on them; you're trying to remove the oil from the inside ring of the bearing where it will be making contact with the sleeve.



*Note: The picture above shows the LSD with frost all over it. That's because I had the LSD in the freezer for a few hours. I did this because I've read that it will help with the installation of the bearing because of the thermal contraction of the metal. The negative side of doing this is that you'll need to clean the sleeve of the frost. It'll also want to sweat, and you'll have to make sure it is clean and dry while you're installing the bearing. I would recommend doing it without freezing.

Set the LSD on a block of wood. Grab one of the bearings and place it on the sleeve. Be sure to place it facing the right way! You don't want to install it upside-down. Place your bearing tool on top of the bearing. Grab the tool with your lazy hand, and a hammer with your dominate hand. Make sure the tool is lined up and not touching the black plastic bearing retainer. Start lightly tapping on it to try to get it started. Always make sure the tool is positioned correctly before hitting it! You'll have some trouble getting it started, just keep trying. Once it is started, continue tapping on it. You want to make sure that it is going on straight. Be sure to hit the top of the tool as centered as possible. If the bearing starts going on crooked, just tap the tool on which ever side the bearing is highest on to try to straighten it out. Keep hammering it down until it is fully seated and cannot go any further. Hit it a few more times for good measure. Visually inspect to see if it is seated all the way around.

Flip the LSD around and do the other side like above. At this point you may want to lay down a few layers of cloth on top of the wood to help protect the bearing that you just installed. If not, you'll be hammering it into the wood.

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4.04 - Remove shaft seals

Do the top half of the case first. Top half = the lightest one, without the gears. Bottom half = the one with the gears.



I had some problems getting the shaft seals out by using a flat head screw driver as a punch and hammering on it. I ended up having to heat the case up to be able to get them out.



Just keep warming the case up around the dotted areas. I just kept doing a sweeping motion across these areas. Once you have heated the case up, turn it upside-down so the inside is facing you, and then use a large flat headed screw driver and hammer to hammer the shaft seal out. Do not hammer against the case! Using a punch that is made out of aluminum would be ideal for this situation as a typical screw driver will mar the machined out surfaces if you accidentally hit it. A small piece of aluminum round stock around 0.5" wide and 3 - 4" long would work as a good make-shift punch.

*Note: After you remove the seal you may want to try to remove the race at this point while the case is still hot. See 4.05 for details.

Once you get the seal removed from the top half, start working on the bottom half in the same manner. The only thing with the bottom half is that you won't be able to set it on its side or flip it upside-down. I simply moved the bottom half to the edge of the table and then squated/sat down to heat the case up.

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4.05 - Remove both races



You may have to re-heat the case at this point. Use a screw driver or aluminum punch to hammer the old races out. Position the screwdriver/punch where I have it located at in the picture. If using a screw driver BE CAREFUL! Only hit the race and do not hit the case. If the races aren't coming out easily then try re-heating the case. The old races came out very easily once the case was nice and hot. It only took a few light taps and they popped right out.

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5) Pre-load 'n' Shimmin'
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5.01 - Preload - What & Why

What is preload?



First, let me explain how a tapered roller bearing and race works. If you look at the bearing, it tapers down towards the end of it. The race is simply a "fitting" which has been *precisely* machined to the exact angle that the taper is on the bearing. The bearing will "roll" against the inside of the race. The race is installed into the shaft openings on each side of the transmission case. Preload is simply removing space in order to cause more inwards pressure to be exerted onto the roller bearings.

To wrap your head around the idea a little better, picture the transmission halves bolted together with all components installed, it should look like this:

Case..Race&Bearing..Differential..Bearing&Race..Case

Let me explain it further. Lets just say that if you measured from "Case" to "Case" the measurement came out to be 200.0 mm. If you measured from "Race" to "Race" the measurement came out to be 199.5mm. This means you will have 0.5mm of "free space" some where between the case and the race or differential. So, if you installed a 0.5mm shim between the case and the race, you will remove that "free space," right? Right. This would give you a preload of 0. There's no free space between the case and the races/bearings/differential. You need to go further than that though. You need to have a preload of +0.2mm. So instead of installing that 0.5mm shim, you would install a 0.7mm shim. What happens when you do this? It will cause inwards pressure to be exerted onto the bearings.

Why?

Roller bearings are designed to have a certain amount of inward pressure exerted onto them. If you don't have any inwards pressure, there will be looseness. For instance, if we never installed a shim at all, that 0.5mm of free space would allow the differential to vibrate and shift around because the bearings aren't riding in the races. When that happens, at the very least it will cause damage to the bearing and also cause the teeth of the ring-gear and mating gear to wear out prematurely. Much worse will probably happen though. On the flip side, if there is too much inwards pressure on the bearings, it will cause the bearings to wear out prematurely from excessive friction and heat. Both of these are very bad, which is why it's important to understand preload and to go about measuring it correctly.

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5.02 - Measuring the preload

This process is a little time consuming, so be patient.

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5.02.1 - Install race into lower half

Before installing, be sure the mating surface in the shaft opening is clean. Also make sure the mating surface of the race is clean. Use a hammer and piece of aluminum as a punch to hammer the race into place. You may want to heat the case up for this step. Be sure to install with the correct side up!



I used the end of my bearing installer tool to aid in hammering it down. You won't have to worry too much about marring the surface of the race or case. You can see how damaged up the edge of the tool is in the picture, but it never damaged the race or case. Only thing to really worry about is aluminum shavings that may come off.

You may have some trouble getting it started, but just keep at it. Once it's started it should go down pretty easily. Having the case heated up will help. The trick to getting it started is putting something on top of the race that is flat, and using that to hit it down with. Something like a small block of wood will work, but you may risk getting wood shavings into the transmission case. The worst way about getting the race started is by hitting it at single points on the sides. You want to apply a firm blow on the *whole* race, not just one side. Be sure while you are getting it started that you have it aligned correctly. Don't have one side too higher than the other.

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5.02.2 - Install measurement shim & race into upper half

As with the lower half, make sure all mating surfaces are clean

Drop the shim in first. Use the smallest shim available which is 1.44mm. This is your "measurement shim" because it is of a known size. Be sure to measure the shim with a caliper to be sure it is the correct size though! The 1.44mm shim that they sent me wasn't 1.44mm. I think they may have gotten it mixed up. The part numbers matched correctly, but I guess they put it in the wrong packaging at the factory. I ended up using next size up which was 1.5mm.



Next, install the race ontop of the shim. Use the same methods for the previous race, but do not fully install it! You'll want to leave atleast a 1.0mm gap between the race and shim. It can be a slightly larger gap, but it's best to get it closer to where it needs to be so that when you bolt the case together it won't have to press the race down an excessive amount.

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5.02.3 - Set LSD into place

Install it in the same fashion in which you took the old one out.

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5.02.4 - Bolt the case together
Be sure to clean the mating surfaces of the two halves before bolting them back together. When setting the top half back onto the bottom, be sure to be careful with sliding the input shaft through the opening. You don't want to damage the input shaft seal. Once the case is together, install all the bolts by hand that are marked in blue in this picture:



As you can see, you're wanting to install all of the bolts that circle the differential. The ones on the other half of the transmission can have every other one installed. It's not really necessary to install every single one on that side, but if you want to you can. While tightening the bolts down, do it in as much of a star pattern as possible. Be sure to keep an eye on the gap between the two halves to make sure you're not tightening one side down more than the other. Torque all the bolts down to 30 ft/lbs.

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5.02.5 - Measure gap & determine preload



On the top half of the case, use feeler gauges to determine how much gap is between the shim and the lip of the case. I say between the shim and the case because gravity should have the shim sitting on the race at this point. Continue gauging the gap until you find the exact size. Be sure to measure it in different places to make sure the race is seated evenly or you may get an inaccurate reading. Once you find the correct size, add the measuring shim size, the feeler gauge size, and then add 0.2mm to that. For instance, if you used the 1.44mm shim for measurement, and your gap is 0.55mm, add 0.2mm to that, example: 1.44+.55+.20 = 2.19mm. In this case, I would use a 2.2mm shim. This brings up one thing I should mention though:

The Ford manual states that the available shim sizes are 1.44 - 2.28mm in 0.02mm steps, which means there should be around 40 or so available shim sizes. This is BS: the parts site* only has 10 listed, so I don't really know what's going on here. The parts site also only shows shim sizes available from 1.44 to 2.2mm. I don't know which is wrong, the parts site or the manual. The manual also says: "If the thickness of the required shim is odd, select the shim with the next higher thickness value."

Take this information as you will, but you may want to do some research/calling.

*Note: For choosing all the parts, I used lakelandfordparts.com instead of fordparts.com. For some reason fordparts.com doesn't even have shims for the MMT6 transmission even cataloged, but if you enter in the part number it will come up. Lakeland Ford does have them cataloged however.

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5.03 - Remove measuring shim

Now that you know what sized shim you need, go ahead and seperate the case and remove the race on the top half case so you can replace the measurement shim with the correct sized shim. You'll want to re-heat the case and all that jazz. Be sure when you are punching out the race that you do not damage it. Use an aluminum punch. If you absolutely have to, use a screwdriver but be very gentle with it. If you mar the back side of the race it's not a death sentence since the bearing rides on the inside of the race.

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5.04 - Install correct shim & race

Be sure that all of the mating surfaces are clean once more. Before installing the shim, check it with a caliper to ensure it is the correct size. Once you drop the shim into place, go ahead and install the race ontop of it for the final time. This time you can press the shim all the way down.

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6) Finishing up the transmission

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6.01 - Bolt the case together, for the last time

Before closing her up, you'll want to give the case a quick look over. Make sure there is no dirt or anything that shouldn't be in there. You can also clean the metal shavings off of the magnet:



Now that you've inspected the internals and there is no dirt or anything in there, lets seal her up! Clean the mating surfaces and make sure it's nice, smooth, and clean. Use the high temp anaerobic gasket maker on the mating surfaces:



Ford recommends a 2mm wide line, but I went a little bigger. Be sure to encircle each bolt hole to prevent leaks from the holes. I tried to keep gasket compound in the center or slightly near the outer edge to minimize the amount that will get squeezed to the inside of the case.

Once your gasket maker is applied, reinstall the top half of the transmission. You may want to use some loctite on the bolts when you're reinstalling them. Once again, torque them all down to 30 ft/lbs in as much of a star pattern as possible, while making sure you don't tighten down one side more than the other.

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6.02 - Install new shaft seals.

Gently hammer the two new shaft seals in with a plastic/rubber hammer. Heating the case up before hand will ease installation. Be careful not to damage the seals! It may take some time to get them seated correctly. The best thing to do is to use something flat that's about the same width or slightly wider than the seals, and put that on top of the seal and hit against that so that it pushes down on the seal evenly. If you're just going back and forth hitting the sides of the seal you're going to go no-where.

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6.03 Reinstall slave cylinder



Clean the mating surface of the slave cylinder and also the mating surface around the input shaft. Apply a thin coat of gasket maker to the slave cylinder as shown above. Set the slave cylinder down in place. Tighten the bolts to 8.1 ft/lbs. Ford wants you to use new bolts for this, but I reused the old bolts. Proceed to install the other piece of the slave cylinder that has the rubber boot on it. Be sure that the bleeder valve section of it is facing the right way.

Also, don't forget to reinstall the clip that you removed!

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6.03 - Lube the shaft!

Lightly put some high temp grease on the splines of the input shaft:



That's it! The transmission is ready to be put back in!

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7) Reinstall transmission
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7.01 - Lifting & mating

Put it back on the transmission jack and strap it down. Don't forget to use a block on the one side so that it's positioned correctly. Roll it underneath the car and begin jacking it up. Try to maneuver it in the same fashion that you did while taking it out. Once you have the transmission high enough, start moving it towards the clutch/flywheel. Be careful not to damage the fingers of the pressure plate with the input shaft. You'll have to get the splines of the input shaft lined up with the splines of the clutch. If it doesn't go in, you'll have to try rotating the input shaft a little. Try again until it goes in. Get the holes lined up as perfectly as you can, and then reinstall all the bolts that mount the transmission to the engine with the exception of the very top three. You'll have to leave these out so you may install the starter motor. See section 1.05 to see what three bolts I'm talking about. Torque the rest of the bolts down to 35 ft/lbs in a star-pattern.

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7.02 - Transmission mount

Reinstall the transmission lower mounting bracket with 3 new bolts. Torque to 59 ft/lbs.



Reinstall the actual mount, along with the main bolt that ties into the lower bracket. Torque the main bolt to 109 ft/lbs



#########################
7.03 - Remove transmission jack

At this point you can remove your transmission jack. After it is removed, re-check the torques on the transmission>engine bolts and the main transmission mounting bolt.

#########################

8) Putting stuff back together
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8.01 - Reinstall rear motor mount

Reinstall your RMM. Follow the install instructions for what ever RMM you have installed. The engine support bar may need to be loosened to allow the RMM to line up correctly.

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8.02 - Remove engine support bar, if utilized

Remove it, and reinstall the two plastic pieces that you removed to make way for the support bar.

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8.03 - Reinstall LH halfshaft

Install a new circlip to the end of the LH halfshaft. Put some high temp grease on the splines of both ends of the halfshaft. Reinstall the end of the halfshaft that has the circlip into the differential/transmission. Be careful not to damage the shaft seals! You will have some trouble getting the shaft inserted all of the way because of the circlip. Just keep trying. I managed to push it in by hand. If it's not going in, rotate it slightly and try again. Don't hit against the CV joints or compress the inner joint. Also, don't forget about bending the CV joints past their intended design. When the shaft goes in you should feel/hear it. Double check that it's in by trying to pull it out; it shouldn't come out.

Once you have the shaft fully seated into the differential, proceed to inserting the other end into the splines of the hub. Try your best to pull it into the hub as far as you can by hand, and then put one of the old hub nuts onto it. Tighten it up enough that it pulls the shaft in. You'll be removing this nut and installing a new one shortly.

Hook the lower control arm back up to the knuckle, and install a new bolt and bolt. The bolt is a T55 torx head. Torque it to 61 ft/lbs.

Reinstall the brake line back to the bracket. Torque to 8 ft/lbs.

For this you will need another person to help you. Remove the old hub nut and put the new one on. Have someone lightly step on the brakes while you are tightening it. It's a two-stage tightening method. First, torque it down to 59 ft/lbs then turn it 90°. While tightening, do it in a continuous motion. Do not back it out once you are tightening it.

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8.04 - Reinstall RH halfshaft

Put some high temp grease on the splines of the halfshaft. Insert the halfshaft into the differential by hand. Be careful with the shaft seals. Once you can't get it inserted any further by hand, hook your 1 3/4" U-bolt style exhaust clamp onto the shaft like so:



Don't forget to protect the shaft with something. I used a cheap bicycle innertube. Lightly tap against the clamp. You should see the shaft slowly going in. Keep lightly hitting it until it gets all the way in.

Install the new bearing retainer and nuts. Torque the two nuts to 19 ft/lbs:



Hook the lower control arm back up to the knuckle like you did the LH side.

Reinstall brake line like you did on the LH side.

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8.05 - Fill your transmission with fluid.

Now would be a good time to fill the transmission back up with fluid, assuming the car is level. Open up the fill hole. You can see where it is in the picture in section 2.02. Use a hose and funnel to pour fluid into the hole.



Fill the transmission all the way up to the hole. The high level is basically, well, it coming out of the hole. The low level is 5mm below the hole. Be sure to have an oil pan to catch any spills.

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8.05 - Reinstall intercooler piping

Torque the two intercooler bolts down to 8 ft/lbs. Oh yeah, and for the worm clamps ford recommends you to torque them to 3.6 ft/lbs. What a joke, no wonder people's IC pipes are popping off. I would just recommend going out and buying some T-bolt clamps to replace the crappy worm clamps.

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8.06 - Reinstall starter motor

Torque the two bolts to 30 ft/lbs and the two nuts that hold the bracket on to 18 ft/lbs

Install the final three transmission>engine bolts as shown in section 1.05. Torque them to 35 ft/lbs.

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8.07 - Reinstall gear position sensor and ground cable

See section 1.07's picture #1 and picture #2. Torque ground cable to 18 ft/lbs.

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8.08 - Reinstall brake line to slave cylinder

Don't forget to install the clip that holds it together. See section 1.07 picture #4.

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8.09 - Reinstall shifter linkages

Reinstall the linkage's mounting bracket back onto the transmission. The brake line leading to the slave cylinder should be ran underneath this mounting bracket. Re-attach the linkages to their mounts, and snap the ends back onto the shifter posts. See section 1.06 picture #1.

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8.10 - Reinstall the battery tray and battery

Refer to section 1.02 in reverse order.

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8.11 - Reinstall airbox & intake

Refer to section 1.01 in reverse order, and section 1.04.

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8.12 - Reinstall cowl panel

Refer to section 1.03 in reverse order

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8.13 - Reinstall LH splash guard

Refer to section 2.05.

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8.14 - Reinstall Front Bumper & ECU

Reinstall these if you happened to remove it or reposition it

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9)The last few things
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9.01 - Bleeding, but not dying

Now that you have air all in the line leading to the slave cylinder, you'll need to bleed the line. You'll need one of these:



It's a brake line vacuum bleeder. You hook it up to the bleeder valve on the slave cylinder and suck that air right on through. Well, you also suck some fluid too. I had to use some 1/4" x .170" vinyl tube to be able to attach the end of the brake bleeder to the bleeder valve's nipple. You can see it in the picture below:



While sucking the air and fluid through, you'll want to make sure that the brake fluid reservoir stays full. Don't let it go dry. Keep it at its max level. I ran it dry once by accident. It's no big deal, you'll just have to start over again. Use Motorcraft® DOT 4 LV High Performance Motor Vehicle Brake Fluid to fill it up.

Pump the gun a few times to create some vacuum, then open the bleeder valve by loosening the valve's nut. Once it's open, just keep on pumping it out. You'll get a mixture of air and fluid coming through. Keep on pumping until you don't see any more air coming through. You'll have to stop during this process to empty out the gun's catch can eventually. When you do, close the bleeder valve so that no air will go back into the line. Before opening it back up, be sure to pump the gun a few times to create a vacuum, then open the bleeder valve back up to keep on suckin'. I ended up pulling about 4-5 canisters full of fluid through the lines, just to be on the safe side. I recommend buying two bottles of brake fluid for this job, just in case. I only used one bottle but you may need more. If you don't use the 2nd bottle it's always good to have some laying around anyways.

Once you think you're good to go, close the bleeder valve all the way, and then go check your clutch pedal to see how it feels. You should be able to feel if it's normal or not. If it doesn't feel right, try pumping it a few times, and then go bleed it some more. Come back and try again. It should feel just as firm as it felt before you started this project.

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9.02 - Reinstall the bottom slash guard

I've taken this thing off more times than I can count. I hate this thing. Go ahead and reinstall it. Bah! I wish it was a quick-disconnect.

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9.03 - Reinstall wheels

Reinstall your wheels and torque your lug nuts to 100 ft/lbs.

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9.04 - Drop your car to the ground

Oh yeah, drop it like it's hot! Just make sure you have wheels on it before you drop it :)

#########################


I hope someone enjoyed the read and utilized this information to aid with their LSD installation. Like I said at the very beginning of this post, if you would like to show your appreciation, please just click the "Like" button. No need to post a "thank you". If you have a specific question relating to the LSD installation, please feel free to ask in this thread. Any other posts please direct them to my build thread.

Have fun and drive safe,
"Ocysp", the guy who makes it look cool to walk around with an MMT6 transmission in his hands:

 

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Very nice write up. About to actually read it. Just wanted to comment on how the hell can you post more then 10 pictures in one post? Well, I'll be back in a few hours, after I'm done reading this.

Edit: guess I should have at least read the first sentence, sorry. Im sure Ill have a question, so this is just reserving my spot.

Edit 2: Just got done reading it. No real questions, just want to comment that some of the writing on the pictures can be hard to read, specifically most of the text in Blue and some of the Black. It's easier to read when zoomed so I'd recommend linking directly to the pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Very nice write up. About to actually read it. Just wanted to comment on how the hell can you post more then 10 pictures in one post? Well, I'll be back in a few hours, after I'm done reading this.

Edit 2: Just got done reading it. No real questions, just want to comment that some of the writing on the pictures can be hard to read, specifically most of the text in Blue and some of the Black. It's easier to read when zoomed so I'd recommend linking directly to the pictures.
Don't know about a 10 picture limit. It may be a 10 picture limit for uploaded images. All of the images in my post were linked to my photobucket account.

Yeah, I did notice it being hard to read some of the text on the images. The original images are a bit bigger in scale so they were easy to read when I was editing them. What I didn't really notice was that photobucket downsizes the images. I only really noticed this a few minutes before I posted it as I was checking all of the images to make sure they were linked correctly. If anyone else has any problems reading them just let me know through private message. I may try hosting them on another site.

Have fun and drive safe,
-Ocysp
 

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I'm not sure how you linked the pictures, but if you click on the direct link in photobucket and enter that in the Insert Picture URL, it should fix it.

Test:



Edit: Seems to work. Need to uncheck "Retrieve remote file and reference locally" box tho.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm not sure how you linked the pictures, but if you click on the direct link in photobucket and enter that in the Insert Picture URL, it should fix it.

Test:



Edit: Seems to work. Need to uncheck "Retrieve remote file and reference locally" box tho.
Oh! I meant for the pictures in my post to be the small thumbnails. I didn't want a bunch of big pictures to be shown in the post. I wanted people to click on the image to bring up the full sized one. I see what you're saying about the direct link though. I'll try replacing it with the direct link so when you click on the thumbnail it takes you straight to the high resolution picture instead of the photobucket page with the smaller picture.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
how do you like it?
I definitely like it. Makes it harder to spin the tires. I haven't been able to test it out during hard cornering though, which is really where I'm more concerned with how the LSD will perform.

Have fun and drive safe,
-Ocysp
 

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I always heat bearings in an oven before installing. 275 for 20 mins. They won't just pop on, but you won't have to beat them mercifully.

Might be a helpful tip
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I always heat bearings in an oven before installing. 275 for 20 mins. They won't just pop on, but you won't have to beat them mercifully.

Might be a helpful tip
I thought about doing this but I was hesitant of doing so because of the plastic bearing cage. I was unsure how much heat the plastic cage was designed for so I decided not to.

Have fun and drive safe,
-Ocysp
 

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I thought about doing this but I was hesitant of doing so because of the plastic bearing cage. I was unsure how much heat the plastic cage was designed for so I decided not to.

Have fun and drive safe,
-Ocysp
Oh... Yeah don't do that then lol
 

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You can heat it to at least 250. It's a thermoplastic, they're rated at 150-180*C operating temperature. I always throw the diff in the freezer, to shrink it up a bit, too... Or spray the journals with a little N20.

since I had something useful to add, I can add a "want to have your babies" comment..

Kick-ass writeup, thanks for taking the time to put this together.
 

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Just a couple tips to add. To save money you can make a cheap engine support out of 2x4's and a threaded steel eyelet. Not pretty, but it works. Also the axles can easily be removed from the hubs with an air hammer with a pointed bit. There is an indentation in the end of the shaft so the bit won't slip off and damage anything
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Just a couple tips to add. To save money you can make a cheap engine support out of 2x4's and a threaded steel eyelet. Not pretty, but it works. Also the axles can easily be removed from the hubs with an air hammer with a pointed bit. There is an indentation in the end of the shaft so the bit won't slip off and damage anything
Never thought of the air hammer! Good tip.

Have fun and drive safe,
-Ocysp
 

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Instead of feeler gauge, why not end play indicator?

Without the ring gear, put in thinnest shim, bottom out race cup, bolt trans back together. Setup end play indicator and push up on differential. Repeat 3 or 4 times, average the end play. Find nearest shim. Open case back up, remove cup, remove thin shim, add require preload shim, reinstall cup. Bolt trans back together, this time oiliing the roller bearing. Typically you are looking for 8-12 IN-Lbs turning torque (just about enough to turn with your fingers). If preload checks out, open case again, install ring gear w new bolts (or clean old ones and reloctite), clean magnet, apply anarobic gasket maker and bolt 'er all back together.

Yes, I've done this before - just not on a focus. I believe I have seen bearing drive set at Harbor Freight.

10 Piece Bearing Race and Seal Driver Set
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Instead of feeler gauge, why not end play indicator?
That's a good method also, but a little more expensive if you've got to choose between buying feeler gauges vs a dial indicator. It's roughly a $8 vs $50+ difference.

I believe I have seen bearing drive set at Harbor Freight.

10 Piece Bearing Race and Seal Driver Set
Good find! I'll include that in the how-to. Only bad thing about that is the bearing needs to be pressed on about 1mm below the sleeve of the differential. You'll just need to use something else to press it down that extra 1mm.

Have fun and drive safe,
-Ocysp
 

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OP, good writeup.

Can you make a correction to the diff bearing P/N? Should be:

(2) F7RZ4221AB - Roller-bearing & Race

You had a 5 in there instead of the 7. Confirmed with Ford this morning. Let me know if you have info to the contrary.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
OP, good writeup.

Can you make a correction to the diff bearing P/N? Should be:

(2) F7RZ4221AB - Roller-bearing & Race

You had a 5 in there instead of the 7. Confirmed with Ford this morning. Let me know if you have info to the contrary.
There's two part numbers for it. F7RZ4221AC and F5RZ4221AB. As far as I know, there's no difference. I will check to see what the part number is that I got when I get home.

Have fun and drive safe,
-Ocysp
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Alright, I found my original invoice with all the part numbers. F7RZ4221AC is the one that I had shipped to me. I guess the F5RZ4221AB is an out-dated part number or something. If you try adding F5RZ4221AB to your shopping cart at the fordparts.com site it will automatically add the F7RZ4221AC one instead. I'll update the post with the correct information. Thanks twingtx and good luck with your install! If you have any more questions, feel free to ask!

Have fun and drive safe,
-Ocysp
 
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