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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
ATP Turbo Bolt-On Turbo Upgrade Installation Guide

Hey guys, we recently just finished up installing ATP Turbo’s GTX2867R Bolt-On Turbo Kit on our own 2013 Ford Focus ST. We thought we’d take the opportunity to take pictures and notes along the way in order to help those of you that choose this direction as well. We know from our experience in the past with ATP Turbo kits that they are very simple and affordable for what they do and what they can achieve. A custom turbo setup is always nice but this is a great way to bolt-on a lot more horsepower and torque in a relatively easy way.

Please feel free to ask us any questions you want. We should be able to help with about anything on this install at this point.

As soon as we get this thing tuned, which we are doing on the street, we’ll make sure to get on the dyno and put up some numbers and graphs. Enjoy!

*Pre-Install Recommendations

Installation of anything, especially more in depth installations like a turbo, can be complicated and difficult depending on your experience. There are many supplies you’ll need and keeping them organized is important. Struggling to find something, losing nuts or bolts, or not having supplies when you need them isn’t fun. Have a table or bench with plenty of room ready to work on during the installation. Have shop towels and paper towels handy at all times. Have an organized place for tools. We also use small plastic ziploc bags with a sharpie to label what bolts come from which section of the car so it is super easy to recall which bolts go where upon reinstallation.

One other note, you’ll need to create an additional vacuum source on the coupler attaching the intake to the turbo. Unless you are using another vacuum source, we suggest purchasing an additional ATP Turbo boost tap that you can put into the intake coupler which is what we did.

Regarding the blowoff valve, because the factory turbo has the blowoff valve built-in, you will now need to relocate the blowoff valve to a new location. The easiest way to do this is to install a CP-E Cold Charge Pipe kit with a new blowoff valve. Otherwise, you can always get a custom setup with a different valve in a different location. However, the CP-E kit has been researched and developed to work specifically with the Focus ST and there is little to worry about with their kit.

*Tools and Supplies Needed

• Lift or Floor Jack and Jack Stands
• Various wrenches and sockets including 7mm, 10mm, 11mm, 13mm, 15mm, 17mm
• Socket Wrench (1/4” and 3/8” drive are both handy)
• Flathead Screwdriver (long and short)
• T30 Torx Bit
• Diagonal Pliers (Dikes)
• Needle Nose Pliers
• Various socket extensions
• Anti-Seize Lubricant
• Orange Coolant
• Engine Oil (factory recommends 5w-30, we used Motul Synthetic 5w-30)

Things you might or might not need depending on any other parts you’re installing simultaneously.

• O2 Sensor Socket
• 19mm Socket for wheels

Step 1 – Disassembly of upper section

Start by taking apart the basic parts that you’ll need to work around as you install the turbo kit. Start with the engine cover first. This detaches by simply pulling up on the cover. It is pressed into 4 different mounting posts.





In this order, take off the windshield wipers, plastic cowling, then the metal cowling.







Disconnect the intake pipe directly behind and on top of the engine bay.







Unplug the two o2 sensor connectors from the top of the engine bay. These are not easy to see with the naked eye, they hide pretty well. If you’re having trouble, start from the actual o2 sensor and follow the wire up to the connector. Be careful unplugging any connectors as the plastic can break easily if you’re not disconnecting them properly.









Step 2 – Disassembly of lower section

Now move to the underside of the car.





Remove the 2 braces located beneath the downpipe and the first part of the cat back exhaust pipe. Depending on which exhaust you have, you may need to remove more or less than this but with our Milltek exhaust, there is a single straight section that easily came out and gave us much more room to work with. So this required us to remove the second, smaller brace in the middle of the car.





Remove the 2 bolts attaching the downpipe flange to the catback flange. Take any hangers off the bushings that are preventing the catback pipe from bending down so that you can take off the first part of the catback pipe. Then, unbolt the downpipe bracket that holds the two hangers in place.







Move to the turbocharger and loosen the clamp for the rubber pipe that connects the turbocharger to the intercooler. Now loosen the clamp on the hard pipe connected to the intercooler. Remove the 2 bolts holding the intercooler piping on through the brackets. Remove the hard pipe and rubber pipe together.







Move back to the turbo. Loosen and remove the v-band clamp connecting the downpipe to the turbo.



Carefully remove the downpipe through the exhaust tunnel towards the back of the car. You can leave the o2 sensors attached. Make sure you are not snagging either o2 sensor on the heat shielding.





Move to the intercooler piping going from the intercooler to the throttle body. Loosen the clamps on both ends of this pipe and remove carefully. We assume most big turbo kits are going to be utilizing a bolt on BOV kit like the CP-E one we used. If you’re using a different setup, you may not need to remove the cold side piping.

Step 3 – Drain all oil and coolant

You can do either one ahead of the other but let as much drain out of each as you can. Of course, most of the oil will drain but not all of the coolant. You’ll still have some left in the coolant lines and hoses but it’s better to have less than more. Coolant pouring everywhere during installation isn’t fun or clean. You can also use hose clamps to close off any lines during install to make sure nothing leaks while you’re working in the engine bay.



Step 4 – Turbo removal

Remove the heat shield by unbolting the two 8mm bolts.



Remove the boost controller from the turbo. You DO NOT want to mix up these lines when reinstalling the boost controller so make sure you keep track of the lines as you remove them. A good suggestion would be to tape a piece of paper with the name of where each line goes before you remove the lines. This way you can easily remember where all the lines went and reconnect them properly. Here are the lines you will remove.

1. One line goes from the turbo to the boost controller.
2. One line goes from the wastegate actuator to the boost controller.
3. One line goes from the intake (pre-turbo) to the boost controller.





After you’ve disconnected the lines, slide the boost controller off of the metal bracket attached to the turbo.

Disconnect the line going from the blowoff valve to the upper 3 port solenoid that sits on top of the engine. This will not be reused if you delete the upper 3 port solenoid which we suggest doing. We’ll show you how to delete that completely later. (In this picture, disregard where he is pointing, the line is located right behind his finger. We didn't originally get a picture of this but this works fine.)



Next, disconnect the coolant drain line going to the turbo. Start by loosening the bracket hold this line to another rubber line. Then loosen the coolant banjo bolt attached to the turbo. Do this with a rag handy to catch any initial coolant that pours out. After you loosen the bolt, let it drain as much as it can before you continue removing it.





Then, disconnect the other side of that same line. Use a rag on this too...just like we did lol.



Disconnect the oil feed line to the turbo.





Disconnect the other coolant line which is the feed line.



Sorry for the poor quality on the next few photos. On the first one, we are showing the line coming from the bottom of the picture being disconnected. On the second picture, we're showing the line that looks like it's coming out from behind the FoMoCo stamp on that rubber hose.





Disconnect the oil drain line.





Detach the 4 nuts holding the turbo on the studs located on the cylinder head.







Pull the turbo out of the bottom of the car.











Step 5 – Turbocharger prep and line assembly

Check all the fasteners that hold the turbo together. From time to time, these will loosen before the turbo shows up at your door or were mistakenly never tightened down. It’s a good idea to make sure both the turbine and compressor housings are secured tightly to the center housing and all related turbo components are tightly secured.







Assemble the lines on the turbo first. This will be much easier trying to install them after the turbo is connected.

Make sure the oil feed fitting, which is the gold, -3 AN fitting is tightened down on the turbo. This came already attached on our kit. Using the -3 AN stainless steel braided line, attach the line to the turbo oil feed on the gold fitting.





Attach the coolant line via the banjo fitting provided with the kit. Make sure to pay attention to the orientation of the turbo when you are fitting the lines up. Follow these pictures to fit the other lines to the turbo.











Attach the barbed fitting to the end of the coolant FEED line. This should be the longer coolant line.



There are 2 other fittings to connect the oil line to the engine block. One is an adapter from the block to the 2nd fitting. The 2nd fitting will then attach to the oil line once the turbo is installed on the car. Connect the fittings together while they are off the engine first by tightening them with 2 wrenches. Then, attach it to the engine. DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN. Just make sure it’s very snug but do not crank down on this to tighten it. The engine block is aluminum and will strip easier than steel.







Now, install the coolant adapter fitting on the block. Once again, DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN.



Install the 45 degree fitting on this coolant fitting on the block. Do not tighten down yet. Wait until the turbo is on the car and the line is connected to tighten this down.



Step 6 – Turbo installation

EDIT: When we originally installed the turbo, we separated the two housings to make it easier to get the fire ring seated. However, because we did it this way, and didn't get the turbo locked in properly with the elbow, a leak developed and has been robing us of power for some time now. So, for this step, ignore where we split the turbo from the elbow and install it as a whole. You should be able to hang it on the studs, then go up top and insert the fire ring before you tighten it down to the head. And as always, feel free to PM or call us if you have any questions (303-268-2140)

*We ended up disconnecting the exhaust elbow that connects the turbo to the exhaust manifold in the head. In hindsight, we may have tried harder to connect the entire elbow and turbo assembly before we made that decision. We felt it would be easier to connect the elbow to the manifold first then connect the turbo to the elbow. It wasn’t too hard to do it this way but that turbo is heavy and if you can’t hold it up and get the clamp to go on their quickly, you may struggle getting it attached. It’s up to you but just know that you can assemble it in 2 pieces if you need.

Make sure the v-band clamp and blockoff plate is secure before you put on the elbow.



Make sure the fire ring stays in place. This acts as a gasket for this type of connection.



Attach the elbow to the manifold’s studs. Use the supplied steel washers and copper nuts from ATP to fasten the elbow down. Make sure you use anti-seize lubricant on the nuts so the nuts don’t seize to the stud with excessive heat.









Put a thin layer of anti-seize on the outside of the v-band flanges to keep excessive heat from making it difficult to uninstall it if necessary.

At this point, we removed the rear motor mount so that the engine had enough flex to give us a little extra room to squeeze the turbo through. You can do this before taking the turbo out too if you want.



Put the v-band clamp on the elbow first and let it loosely hang. Lift the turbocharger up to where both v-band flanges meet. Align the clamp so that it will evenly clamp down on both sides. Tighten the clamp enough to hang the turbo but not all the way down yet. Keep the clamp loose enough so that you can rotate the turbo when trying to fit the downpipe. It should still be tight enough to where you will not have to reposition the clamp if it doesn’t align correctly as you tighten it down. It should be aligned and tightened for the most part.





Fasten all the coolant and oil lines from the turbo in their respective positions with the exception of fitting the barbed end of the coolant feed line to the silicone hose provided in the kit. You'll put some heat sheath around it before you connect it in the upper position. All lines should be tightened down pretty tight but do not over tighten any of them. Do not use sealant or thread locker. For some weird reason, we don't have a picture of the oil drain line but that's probably the easiest line to work with. This is the solid line coming straight off the bottom of the turbo and going into the block. It's the shortest line and you reuse the factory one.





*We experienced an issue getting the coolant feed line to connect easily. We ended up having to take off the entire intake, the sound symposer, and peel back a few other items to get to the coolant hose on the driver’s side of the engine that connects to the turbo. The factory clamp was in a really awkward position and we couldn’t get to it while it was fixed to the distribution panel that was attached to the motor. After we removed it, we cut that hose off with our dikes and reinstalled the new one that came with the ATP Turbo kit. After attaching the new hose, we reconnected the coolant panel and the sound symposer and were able to continue putting the car back together. All in all, this took an extra 30-45 minutes. In the pictures here, you can see the smaller hose heading towards the rear of the car is the one being replaced with the ATP Turbo supplied line, not the larger hose on the right. Do not cut that one as that is a larger coolant hose that is not associated with the turbo setup.





Step 7 – Reassembly


Before you start assembling everything back together, make sure everything that has been worked on is tight and secured properly. It's always good to double check your work to make sure everything is tightened down.

Now you are ready to start reassembling the rest of the car.

Start by assembling the boost tap that is provided in the ATP kit into the coupler or tube coming straight off the boosted side of the turbo. This will serve as the new boost source that the boost controller needs to be connected to. The old boost source was in the turbo. The new turbo doesn’t have a built-in boost tap so this is the next best (and easiest) thing. Drill a hole in the coupler. We used an 8mm drill bit. Once you have a clean hole drilled, remove all excess material and put the boost tap through from the inside out. Tighten down the provided nut and secure the e-clip to the boost tap fitting.







Using some DEI Heat Sheath, we wrapped the upper coolant line to protect other lines around it from getting damaged by the stainless steel line. As it moves, it will wear down the rubber hose and put a hole in it eventually. This will also keep outside heat from heating up the lines as much. After this is done, you can put the coolant feed line together with the silicone coming off the plastic coolant distributor.

We also wrapped the oil feed in it as well since it was bent slightly awkwardly and coming in contact with the silicone coupler going from the turbo to the intake pipe.

Now, hook up the boost controller lines to their respective sources. You’ll need to mount the boost controller somewhere. You can choose where you’d like to do this. We temporarily zip tied it to the hard brake line for now. We are going to switch to a different 3-port solenoid shortly and we’ll mount it at that time. We left the original vacuum source open at first since we didn’t have a reliable vacuum source in the intake system like the factory setup. You can use another boost tap (mentioned earlier) to tap into the silicone coupler located before the turbo in the intake system to connect the vacuum port on the boost controller.

Put the worm clamp on the coupler and install the coupler on the turbo. Make sure it is flush against the turbo so there are no leaks. Make sure it is angled mostly straight up to meet the intake pipe. Put the second worm clamp on the coupler and then put the intake pipe in the coupler. Position the intake to where it will ultimately sit in the engine bay. You might want to position the airbox and filter while the intake pipe is able to move freely without being secured down by fasteners.

Move to the underside of the car to attach the downpipe to the turbo. Using anti-seize, apply a light coat around the v-band flanges. Put the v-band clamp on the turbo first and let it hang loosely. Now fit the downpipe through the exhaust tunnel up to meet the turbo. Put the flanges together and fit the v-band clamp around the both flanges and tighten the clamp down enough so that the downpipe is secure but can still be moved around. Connect the opposite end of the downpipe to the catback portion. Make sure you use a fresh gasket so there will be no exhaust leaks. Attach the bracket to the chassis.

Make sure the turbo is in the correct position so that the exhaust and downpipe are in as straight of a line as possible, heading through the middle of the exhaust pipe tunnel on the car. If the turbo won’t rotate on the elbow, barely loosen the clamp from the turbo to the elbow enough so that you can twist the turbo from side to side to position it. Once it’s lined up, tighten both v-band clamps from the elbow to the turbo and the turbo to the downpipe. Tighten down the downpipe and catback connection now.

Next, feed the o2 sensor wires up to their respective positions to reconnect them. You might need to actually connect them from the top of the car but you can feed them up from the bottom first so you can grab them once you come up to the top.

Reassemble the intake system and make sure all fasteners and electronic connections are in place. Put the engine cover back on.

Pour in the correct amount of oil into the engine.

Pour enough coolant into the reservoir until it fills to the max line. The engine will take more coolant than it originally fills to so make sure you keep putting more in while the motor is running until it is between min and max lines after you cycle coolant through the motor. You can leave the cap off of the reservoir while the car is running at idle, not while you are out driving.

Before you put any covers back on under the car or in the engine bay, start the car to make sure there are no oil leaks, coolant leaks, or loose fixtures rattling around. Make sure you have a bright flashlight to look around in the engine bay as the car runs to identify any sources of leaking or loose connections. Some of the anti-seize will start to burn off and smoke, don’t be alarmed by this. The heat will burn any excess lubricants or fluids that may have come in contact with any of the newly installed parts.

At this point, you can drive the car but do not boost until you have the proper tuning map to do so. Contact a qualified tuner that can start you off with a very conservative base map to drive on or you can drive it to a dyno tuning shop. The car will act normally until it is in higher boost. This is when the tune absolutely needs to be suitable for the new modifications. After tuning the vehicle, let ‘er rip and have fun!



EDIT: How to route BCS lines


Here is a picture (courtesy of Go46Ball) that shows how to setup the BCS on your new turbo.

 

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Nice. :)

Sent from my thumbs - pardon any brevity or typos.
 

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Wow what an amazing write up!!! EA you guys are great!
 
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Discussion Starter #5
That is the bomb post. Question though. What is the approximate time it takes to install after everything is laid out and ready?
I would say less than 6 hours. Since we took our time and took a bunch of pictures and installed the FMIC at the same time, it took us quite a bit longer than it would if you were prepared and just went at it. I bet it could be done in about 4 hours tops.
 

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To make the install easier and I wish I would have done this, the coolant housing (it's plastic) and a PITA to get to the clamp! I actually snapped the nipple off during when trying to remove that hose and had to order a new one (it was like $30). But instead of removing the hose, undo the pinch clamp and pull the factory metal line out. Insert the supplied feed line into the factory hose and clamp it down. If I had to do it all over again that is the route I would have done!
 
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To make the install easier and I wish I would have done this, the coolant housing (it's plastic) and a PITA to get to the clamp! I actually snapped the nipple off during when trying to remove that hose and had to order a new one (it was like $30). But instead of removing the hose, undo the pinch clamp and pull the factory metal line out. Insert the supplied feed line into the factory hose and clamp it down. If I had to do it all over again that is the route I would have done!
If we would have had to do it over again, we would have done this as well. We wanted to use the supplied line but it is kind of difficult to get that line off without removing all the symposer stuff and going around from the top side.
 

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If we would have had to do it over again, we would have done this as well. We wanted to use the supplied line but it is kind of difficult to get that line off without removing all the symposer stuff and going around from the top side.
Alan have a picture to get an idea as to what this means? Lol. I am somewhat intimidated with this install, but I'm pretty sure I can do it. Also would this install be better done on a rental lift or jack stands in the garage? Found a shop that rents lifts for the day.
 

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If we would have had to do it over again, we would have done this as well. We wanted to use the supplied line but it is kind of difficult to get that line off without removing all the symposer stuff and going around from the top side.
Yeah basically how you guys did it is how I had to in order to replace the housing. Not too bad, those 4 bolts holding it in can be tricky to get to and reinstall. My biggest fear was dropping a bolt into the engine bay and having to look for it. I wanted to use the supplied line as well but hind site is 20/20.
 
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I hope that oil? feed line is not as close as photo suggests, it's certainly not rated for that type of heat.
That's the coolant feed directly above where the downpipe connects to. That is why I used thermo heat sleeves on all the lines for my install, just as a safety measure to help block the heat. Plus I ceramic coated the hot side and exhaust manifold.
 
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I bought a longer oil line. Mine was way to close.
 

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Ive done tonnes of turbo builds/swaps and have had lines like that, if not closer and not once had a problem....
 
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The lines have SS brading and cooler oil and coolant running through them. As long as they are not touching the exhaust housing and are well braced it should be fine.
That is what I was thinking as well... I could see someone wanting a bit longer line...but the Edge AutoSport install looks good.
 

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Alan have a picture to get an idea as to what this means? Lol. I am somewhat intimidated with this install, but I'm pretty sure I can do it. Also would this install be better done on a rental lift or jack stands in the garage? Found a shop that rents lifts for the day.
Here are the only pics I could find of coolant feed issue we had.




You can do it on jack stands but if you have access to a lift it will be much easier on you. I highly recommend renting a lift for the day if you can. But it won't be the end of the world if you have to use jack stands. I installed the big turbo on my ms3 on jack stands and this turbo install is much easier than that one was.

Alan, so what you think? You advise to reroute these lines?
I will say that a slightly longer line would be nice but we put heatsheath on the coolant feed and oil feed lines which we got from the local auto parts store. Just wanted it for extra protection. I don't think there is really any way to reroute the lines and like Alex said with the cooler oil/coolant running through them they should be fine as long as they don't touch.
 
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