Ford Focus ST Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
Either way take your time and do your research on how or what you want to do.



Jamesbaroneracing.com

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,129 Posts
Either way take your time and do your research on how or what you want to do.



Jamesbaroneracing.com

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
:whs:

Modding the car can bite quite well on this platform.
 

Attachments

·
Administrator
Joined
·
12,613 Posts
Been driving my 2015 St3 around the last week after I drove it off the lot in NJ last weekend and then went to a car meet tonight and instantly wanted to do work to my car. At the same time, I dont want to blow her up. Here's a picture of this sexy broad
Welcome aboard!!!

Nice to see another somewhat local member. I work in central Jersey, and am RT1 entirely too much. On the weekends I'm usually in Helmetta.

CJ Pony parts has excellent youtube videos on wrenching, most vendors have install guides, this forum is a wealth of knowledge as well.

There's also some of us that like to get together and have wrenching days. Which I roll out from time to time for some wrenching.

The main thing is research, then preparation, the right tool for the job, followed by proper wrenching techniques. Which all can be picked up in time. Everyone has their own little tricks, and over time hopefully you pick them up.

Two things about working on a new new car, one is there is like no rust. Which is fantastic. Number two is that cosmetically you want it to try and remain immaculate, which can be difficult at times.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
12,613 Posts
"Number 2, cosmetically you want to remain immaculate."
I struggle with this on a weekly basis.
I gave up after I washed my car the first time, so many rock chips, now its just ridiculous. My whole front end is ****ed. So I care less. It's just a filthy dirty DD race car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
704 Posts
If you've never worked on cars at all, start small, proper tools, read up, if you have low mechanical intelligence (which doesn't mean you're stupid in a general sense, it's just that some people can't grasp the mechanical), forget it and pay the tax (mechanic)—it will be cheaper. This is why beaters are great—you can mess with them cheaply, parts are in the junk yard, and they're ideally something simple and robust, so they're hard to screw up too badly. If you can find a junk engine and a place with a stand, you can learn a lot from tearing it down. If it's a cheap engine that's not too much junk (economically rebuildable), getting it running again will have you feeling through the roof.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,252 Posts
The internet is the best tool in your garage IMHO. You can do just about anything by looking on this forum and google.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
326 Posts
I think the most important thing is getting the right tools. This car is pretty easy to work on if you have a basic socket wrench set and some different sized torx bits. Once you get the tools as long as you can follow basic directions it should be no problem. I started wrenching on cars about 8 years ago when I was 16. I had a 2004 Hyundai Tiburon that I did basic maintenance stuff too. Other than that I have zero formal mechanical experience working on cars. So far with the focus I have done everything myself. Youtube videos are very helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
862 Posts
I think the most important thing is getting the right tools. This car is pretty easy to work on if you have a basic socket wrench set and some different sized torx bits. Once you get the tools as long as you can follow basic directions it should be no problem. I started wrenching on cars about 8 years ago when I was 16. I had a 2004 Hyundai Tiburon that I did basic maintenance stuff too. Other than that I have zero formal mechanical experience working on cars. So far with the focus I have done everything myself. Youtube videos are very helpful.
Thank you for that I was looking for that and found it in a previous thread and the file was corrupt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
236 Posts
A) Youtube is an amazing source of knowledge- Even working on cars for 16+years I'm still learning and will often check for a video on Youtube before starting something I haven't done before.
B) Use any resources you have, if you have a mechanically inclined buddy, pay them with a couple beers to oversee you as you are learning.
C) Use the search function on the forum- If you don't know how to do something, chances are someone else had similar questions
D) Don't hesitate to ask questions- a lot of people learning forget that everyone started out knowing nothing, so ask away
E) Know when to step back- If you are getting frustrated, don't know why its not working, take a step back- the more frustrated you are the more likely you are to screw something up-Take a deep breath, hit the forums, google the crap out of it, know when to call a tow truck or take it to the shop.

F) Have fun
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top