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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys - So I have read and heard mixed feeling about stud installation in front hubs. Whats the verdict, do we really need a new hub or can the new studs be re-installed? I think the only hard part I see with stud installation is that, you have to flaten out the round face of the stud in-order to punch/tighten it in.

would appreciate the feedback!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
I think I am going to follow @jalapeno lead and grind and re-install the new studs.

The following studs seem to be the correct fit:
Ichiba MZ-12540 - M12 x 1.5/13mm knurl/40mm (thread-able)/7.5mm knurl length
Dorman 610-340 - M12 x 1.5/13.08mm knurl/42mm (thread-able) - these run slightly shorter then OEM
Dorman 98532 - M12 x 1.5/13.08mm knurl/42mm (thread-able) - these run slightly shorter then OEM

Dorman 641-1581 - these run slightly longer than OEM, and can be grinded down, their crown is also not as big as OEM so less grinding of the hub required

The Dorman's are available at your local auto shops, Ichiba is Ebay it seems

Thanks for the info and the pics on your thread @jalapeno and @trimmers for the Ichiba stud info. I will update this thread with the Dorman studs - so down the road people have the correct info if they need to replace their studs individually, rather then spending $200 to replace the whole damn hub. What a pathetic design by Ford!
 
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Glad to see you came to (what I believe is) the correct answer. As long as you have an angle grinder and a bit of patience, it doesn't seem like too much work to make the required space for install/removal and saves a fair bit of $$ versus replacing the entire hub.
 

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i used a dremel (rotary tool) over a grinder to be more precise. good luck with the stud, ill PM you my # in case you need any help
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
i used a dremel (rotary tool) over a grinder to be more precise. good luck with the stud, ill PM you my # in case you need any help
Thank you!

I have all the tools (Dremel included) just need to get a couple of studs and will take care of this, this weekend! Will post the results, hopefully its smooth sailing with some elbow grease!

NOTE TO SELF - DO NOT TAKE A BREAKER BAR TO TIGHTEN YOUR LUGS! USE A TORQUE WRENCH!(I know its stupid, and I did this mistake, so live and learn!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I can confirm that the correct part numbers for the Dorman studs (available at NAPA auto parts) are:
Dorman 610-340 and 98532 - they showed up as the same part. I just picked up 2 studs for $5
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Update Post #2 has been updated with additional info:

I tackled the project and ended up breaking one more stud during removal - glad I bought 2 studs, which turned out to be shorter, so went to NAPA again and got Dorman 641-1581 - these studs run slightly longer then OEM (they can be grinded down if you want) and the crown is smaller in circumference, so less grinding of hub required to slide them in.

I tested fitted the brakes and the wheels and it seems the lugs on OEM studs dont engage all the threads, if you see in the pic below once everything is mounted there seems to be around 4mm or more engagable threads on OEM studs, but since the studs are not long there are less threads to engage for the lug.

When i tested fitted the lugs with OEM vs new studs, the lugs were sitting at the same point after being tight on both of them, which made me realize that this will not be an issue, and in fact its good more threads engaged = more assured

took drill bits from small to big to break those suckers up: : USE lots of lube - WD40 works fine!
drill bits used:
1. punch that sucker first
2. drill with 9/64 - this is just to give you an idea - from small to big you can use drill-bits in any size shape or form when going from small to big
3. 5/16
4. 3/8
5. 1/2 - this is the BIG and the main one, which will break the lug - my Dewalt regular bit broke, so i got a Milwaukee 1/2 made of Cobalt, the writing on the package is for Hard metal - thats what you need!


broken lugs: replaced with new Gorilla lugs


hub grinded: didnt have paint handy, but will be painted soon, when i switch to the winter set


slightly longer Dorman 641-1581 studs - they work perfectly fine:


All tucked up:


hope this helps someone down the road!
 
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