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Hey everyone,

I'm wanting to pick everyone's brain and data center on this topic. So at a cars and coffee I attend, a fellow FoST owner (now drives an RS), had mentioned to me that if you perform the following sequence, it will cut the fuel from being injected and allow the oil to cycle through the engine before the car is actually running. He had mentioned that he did it on very cold days <10*f to get the oil flowing before the car is started. I was kind of puzzled at what he said, and he also mentioned that it's somewhat usual on DI cars. The RS does not do this.

Anyway, so I wanted to verify his statement when leaving. Sure enough the car cut the fuel and didn't start and kept turning over until I let off the gas pedal.

Sequence:

clutch in
Neutral
Floor the gas pedal and hold
Press the start button

While the gas pedal is held down as you press the start button, the car keeps turning over ( I guess cycling the oil through the block and building pressure?)...it is only after you let off the throttle the car injects fuel and the engine finally starts.

Can anyone/does anyone have any validation to this, or what it could be doing instead?

To my knowledge, it does seem to cut fuel as obviously the car isn't starting until the throttle is lifted. Or it's cutting spark.
 

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It does work, but I've never heard of doing this in the cold. Then again, it's rarely that cold where I live.
 

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This is called "clear flood mode" which most FI cars do. It's not to cycle the oil and I would not do this unless you have flooded the engine with too much fuel. Typically this would only happen if you had leaking injectors or flooded it with cleaner.
 

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Every fuel-injected car Ford's made since at least 1989 does this. Fully depressing the throttle pedal disables the injectors. It's so you can clear the gas out in case of a flooded cylinder from not starting. My SHOs did this, and thanks to their ****ty crank sensors this was needed a lot.
 

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Every fuel-injected car Ford's made since at least 1989 does this. Fully depressing the throttle pedal disables the injectors. It's so you can clear the gas out in case of a flooded cylinder from not starting. My SHOs did this, and thanks to their ****ty crank sensors this was needed a lot.
LOL I also had to replace the crank sensor on my SHO. Not the most reliable vehicle ive ever owned but i sure do miss it sometimes
 

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Really no need to floor the pedal and pre-oil the bearings after an oil change regardless whether the filter was pre-filled or not. Assuming the car was run and the oil changed warm, there is plenty of oil retained in the bearings to support the crank/rods/cams etc. until fresh oil starts flowing. The hydraulic wedge is generated by the rotation of crank, cam, etc., not pressure or flow from the oil pump. You do need flow from the pump to replace oil that is flung out of the bearing, and to push out oil before it overheats (from friction) and begins to break down. But in the few seconds after an oil change, no big deal.
 

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LOL I also had to replace the crank sensor on my SHO. Not the most reliable vehicle ive ever owned but i sure do miss it sometimes
I purchased an '89 SHO new - gawd am I that old? Replaced the CPS as pm when doing the timing belt, but never had a problem with it. I was one of the lucky ones that had the stud for the timing belt tensioner fail. That was an ugly repair. Other than the timing belt, never had a problem that took it off the road in 100K miles over about 8 years. Did have a leaky rack and pinion and the usual problems with the quick connect a/c hoses, but it wasn't a bad car at all.
 
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