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2016 Ford Focus ST with 52k miles, automatic
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone please tell me what would cause my left front drivers side wheel bearing to go out 2 times in 3 months. I hit black ice, the curbside and replaced rotors, callipers, pads, all 4 tires and an alignment. Did I bend the drive axle on that side or what? Because this time it's going bad really quick. Thank you.
 

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2014 ST3. Garrett Powermax turbo, Thermal Turboback, CPE intercooler, JBR intake, Innovative RMM
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The impact caused the first failure. Have you diagnosed That the second failure is in fact the same bearing?
 

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@Waggs , does your car vibrate while driving it?
 

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Did you replace the wheel bearing yourself? You can ruin bearings if you set them old school style with a hammer and socket. Gotta use a press and/or cooling/heating
 

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Also, you could have done some damage to the CV axle? they have a good bit of flexibility, but if you bent the control arm in far enough you could have crunched the CV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Also, you could have done some damage to the CV axle? they have a good bit of flexibility, but if you bent the control arm in far enough you could have crunched the CV.
I've considered the cv axle. Thats next. The control arms fine, a new alignment also. 2nd new bearing installed by a nationwide shop. All new rotors callipers, pads, & 4 new tires. ???
 

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The control arms fine, a new alignment also.
Yes, but there was a collision accident. Could have damaged or significantly reduced the life of the CV axle. put a few more miles on it and it starts giving out.

What all got bent up in the collision?
 

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I've heard non-motorcraft bearings can be hit or miss on quality and fail early but I'd still expect them to last several thousand miles.

Other than what was mentioned, if they were not pressed in perfectly straight, that can cause them to fail as well. I know when I pressed mine in, it was hard fitting the knuckle in the press and getting everything level.
 

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I bought it from a dealer in my town. Why?
Because the Focus ST was only sold in manual in the states. The US MK3 (our cars) were never even offered from factory with automatics.
 

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2015 ST3, no sunroof, Koenig Oversteers
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There are two common causes of accelerated wheel bearing wear after replacement.

1. The bearing is damaged during installation into the hub.

2. The axle nut is insufficiently torqued.

This video shows an ST front wheel bearing replacement. At the end of the video, the person doing the change confesses that he damaged a bearing installing it into the hub.

It may be helpful to talk a little bit about the important of axle nut torque. The ST's front wheel wheel bearing is constructed of three important parts: an outer race, an inner race, and steel balls constrained by a cage that run between the races. The bearing is constructed of two halves, each of which contain a race. The races and balls have no inherent ability to bear lateral load, so when the car turns, something else must bear the lateral load and keep the bearing from coming apart. That something is the axle nut.

It's easily understood that the axle nut holds the axle in the bearing assembly in the hub, so that the axle's splines can transmit torque to the hub. What isn't well known is that the second function of the nut is to set a clamping force on both sides of the bearing. This force constrains the bearing when lateral load is applied prevents the races from moving laterally relative to each other. When the races move laterally, the bearing can wear very quickly.

The clamping force issues is very important. Honda S2000 owners learned a long time ago that they should overtorque their rear wheel bearings if they want them to last a long time. It seems that Honda's factory torque spec is just ever-so-slightly insufficient to prevent lateral movement under chronic high performance driving.

A third cause of bearing wear is failure to lubricate the bearing. Never having replaced an ST front bearing, I don't know if they have to be packed but if they do, and you didn't, the bearing will have a very short life.

A long time ago, before some of you were born, I owned a 1988 Chevrolet Beretta GT. (2.8L V6, 5MT, digital dash. Fun car. Cheap, too.) It went through a left front wheel bearing once about every 20,000 miles. They were cheap and the fix was easy so I kept replacing it. If I'd known then what I know now, I'd have only replaced it one time. In hindsight, I'm quite sure that I wasn't applying enough torque to the axle nut.
 
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Also, you could have done some damage to the CV axle? they have a good bit of flexibility, but if you bent the control arm in far enough you could have crunched the CV.
While whacking the wheel on the curb can ruin a CV joint, a bad CV joint is unlikely to ruin a wheel bearing. Wheel bearings are capable of handing very high loads. A little load from a vibrating CV joint is unlikely to create issues with a wheel bearing if the bearing is undamaged, seated correctly in the hub, and torqued properly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Yes, but there was a collision accident. Could have damaged or significantly reduced the life of the CV axle. put a few more miles on it and it starts giving out.

What all got bent up in the collision?
Fortunately all that was destroyed were the tire and the wheel/rim. And like I "ANSWERED YOU"
There are two common causes of accelerated wheel bearing wear after replacement.

1. The bearing is damaged during installation into the hub.

2. The axle nut is insufficiently torqued.

This video shows an ST front wheel bearing replacement. At the end of the video, the person doing the change confesses that he damaged a bearing installing it into the hub.

It may be helpful to talk a little bit about the important of axle nut torque. The ST's front wheel wheel bearing is constructed of three important parts: an outer race, an inner race, and steel balls constrained by a cage that run between the races. The bearing is constructed of two halves, each of which contain a race. The races and balls have no inherent ability to bear lateral load, so when the car turns, something else must bear the lateral load and keep the bearing from coming apart. That something is the axle nut.

It's easily understood that the axle nut holds the axle in the bearing assembly in the hub, so that the axle's splines can transmit torque to the hub. What isn't well known is that the second function of the nut is to set a clamping force on both sides of the bearing. This force constrains the bearing when lateral load is applied prevents the races from moving laterally relative to each other. When the races move laterally, the bearing can wear very quickly.

The clamping force issues is very important. Honda S2000 owners learned a long time ago that they should overtorque their rear wheel bearings if they want them to last a long time. It seems that Honda's factory torque spec is just ever-so-slightly insufficient to prevent lateral movement under chronic high performance driving.

A third cause of bearing wear is failure to lubricate the bearing. Never having replaced an ST front bearing, I don't know if they have to be packed but if they do, and you didn't, the bearing will have a very short life.

A long time ago, before some of you were born, I owned a 1988 Chevrolet Beretta GT. (2.8L V6, 5MT, digital dash. Fun car. Cheap, too.) It went through a left front wheel bearing once about every 20,000 miles. They were cheap and the fix was easy so I kept replacing it. If I'd known then what I know now, I'd have only replaced it one time. In hindsight, I'm quite sure that I wasn't applying enough torque to the axle nut.
You DIDN'T ANSWER MY QUESTION.
I've heard non-motorcraft bearings can be hit or miss on quality and fail early but I'd still expect them to last several thousand miles.

Other than what was mentioned, if they were not pressed in perfectly straight, that can cause them to fail as well. I know when I pressed mine in, it was hard fitting the knuckle in the press and getting everything level.
Thank you
Because the Focus ST was only sold in manual in the states. The US MK3 (our cars) were never even offered from factory with automatics.
Would you like to see a picture of the console area. I mean heck I'm 60 years old and been driving for 45+ years and I have the uncanny ability to differentiate between manual and automation transmissions, + I believe that I would have noticed the EXTRA pedal, right, LOL.
 
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