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Discussion Starter #1
Having no track time with the ST since I bought it, it didn't know how it behaves at the limit and turns out it's very tail happy. Now, my car's pretty modified with several rear-end stiffening parts (Steead RSW, RSW links and STB, TB rear traction bar and mid-chassis brace) and I'm not sure if these mods exacerbated the oversteering nature of the chassis. When I worked the course, there were a couple of STs with basically stock suspension and they both appeared pretty neutral through the tight turns. I lowered rear tire pressure to 33 PSI and that seems to have helped but not eliminate the oversteer. Is my rear end way to stiff? I haven't done much stiffening mods to the front except for the TB front traction bar and Mountune STB. Should I add a FSB to the front or remove bracing in the back?
 

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#1 - The Steeda rear antisway bar is too stiff for an otherwise stock suspension. Here's the swaybar chart... the orange bar for Suspension Techniques is about where you want to be.
p108811012750.png

#2 - Increase rear toe-in so when the rear lets go, it is "stable" rather than trying to kill you.

#3 - Change your driving style so you're not tossing it as much, braking in a straight line only. I feel it's absurd to change driving style unless absolutely necessary, so this is a last resort.
 

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Autocross also exacerbates the over steering tendency of a big rear bar FoST as inputs tend to be more abrupt than on a road course drive. Like @gemery said, the Steeda bar is way too stiff for an otherwise stock car, and I even switched it out in favor of the Suspension Techniques bar and my suspension is further done than most on here with non conventional damping, much higher spring rates front and rear, and a lot of needed front camber
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the tips @gemery and @freakin_elrod. I think I'll try adding toe-in first since I need to add adjustable toe links anyway (I'm sitting pretty low). If that doesn't help, I may switch out the Steeda bar for the ST as you guys said. Any opinions as far as upgrading the FSB? I already have one (Steeda) waiting to get installed but if it's not going to help and the car doesn't need it, I'd rather not go through the pain of installing it.
 

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I did the Steeda Front sway bar recently... after living with the rear for almost a year. I loved the oversteer in the rear - felt like a front drive Porsche, getting the rear to whip around like no tomorrow... BUT knew it was not balanced. Fun! I was actually able to drift quite easily...

So I put the front sway bar on, and even before I got it all aligned... crazy control. and really balances the car out big time, now I can't get the tail loose anymore - it just goes where I point it... I got rid of the front toe in also (from the factory wheel alignment), and became even more responsive.

Now I am doing the struts, Bilstein B8 all around... (frpp springs already). just because I replaced almost everything else there... might as well get it all to match...
 

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One thing that you should be aware of is that whenever possible you want to address the end that you are having trouble with. So in your case, I would say that softening the rear is the best route to take. Stiffening the front may neutralize the oversteer, but it doesn't necessarily mean that there will be more grip. In general, I have found that softer results in more grip, to a point of course.
 

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One thing that you should be aware of is that whenever possible you want to address the end that you are having trouble with. So in your case, I would say that softening the rear is the best route to take. Stiffening the front may neutralize the oversteer, but it doesn't necessarily mean that there will be more grip. In general, I have found that softer results in more grip, to a point of course.
:agree::agree::agree:
 

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Debated on joining the great suspension debate but foshjowler is correct. You always want to start at the end giving issues. You also said you are lowered. Most springs on the market are softer in the rear which is not how the st is set up from the factory. Then people but super stiff rear bars on to compensate and it creates a snappy rear. Also as a general note sway bars typically decrease grip as they get bigger. The advantage you gain is car control which is why people feel this makes the car faster. There’s a reason some race teams disconnect sway bars in the rain. Depending on the car and drivers needs of course.


Edit: sway bars should be looked at as fine tuning tools while spring and damper changes are the major adjustments for things like body roll, type of driving, and what you are driving on.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Its design that way on purpose. You need to transfer weight to the rear. Approach the curve fast, hard brake while still on straight line only, before turning. . Be aggressive on the gas while turning without overpowering the front wheel avoiding front end sliding, the rear tires will stick like glue. Practice on an empty lot to build up your confidence.
 
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