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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anybody know why these cars have almost no engine braking? Is it because of the lower compression ratio or is there another factor?
 

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Dual mass flywheel

I have to plan my stops ahead with the ST to let gravity do its thing so that I'm not adding unnecessary brake/clutch wear. I can time all the traffic lights/controls well on my regular commutes so I never need to come to a hard stop.

Doing that will annoy the idiots who prefer to race to a stop for red lights. Maybe they'll learn one day.
 

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low compression ratio. Engine braking uses the compression stroke to slow the car, with a low compression ration that stroke is less effective.
 

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Third is my go to slow down gear, it's perfect at down shifting around 40mph and you can instantly notice how much less brake you need, I'm super soft on my clutch during regular driving so I don't mind constantly downshifting into third, try it, you'll end up always doing it

Sent from my SM-G900T using Tapatalk
 

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low compression ratio. Engine braking uses the compression stroke to slow the car, with a low compression ration that stroke is less effective.
Interesting! Well that explains why my 12:1 compression Honda's (vtec yo) had epic engine braking. And I thought it was only because of the close ratio 5spd manuals in them.

Going to note that for any future vehicle purchases (comparing compression ratios because nerd) just to compare out of interest, not hinging my choice on that alone or anything or I'll end up in one of those new Skyactiv Mazda with a 14:1 ratio engine...
 

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There's guys on here still on a stock clutch after 80k+ miles of habitual clutch pedal stabbing and frequent gear grabbing.

Just riding out the brakes while rolling in neutral just doesn't seem right to me.
 
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I heard engine braking is good for putting additional stress on your drivetrain in order to protect your brake pads from additional wear.
My Crown Victoria survived 420k miles of manually shifting down to use engine breaking (sold, still being driven), my SVT Contour, and Subaru WRX never had transmission issues from down shifting, nor has my Motorcycle, or truckers who down shift and use Jake/PAC brakes.

Sorry, I disagree.
 

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My Crown Victoria survived 420k miles of manually shifting down to use engine breaking (sold, still being driven), my SVT Contour, and Subaru WRX never had transmission issues from down shifting, nor has my Motorcycle, or truckers who down shift and use Jake/PAC brakes.

Sorry, I disagree.
The components can most likely take the engine braking through the life of the vehicle especially if you do it right but zakiu's point is still valid. Using expensive components like your engine, clutch, and transmission to slow down the car just to save little brake wear is pretty stupid. I still do it though lol

My grandpa always said "clutches are expensive, brake pads are cheap"
 

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The components can most likely take the engine braking through the life of the vehicle especially if you do it right but zakiu's point is still valid. Using expensive components like your engine, clutch, and transmission to slow down the car just to save little brake wear is pretty stupid. I still do it though lol

My grandpa always said "clutches are expensive, brake pads are cheap"
Being ready to accelerate if needed to say avoid an accident while slowing by being in a proper gear is a nice benefit, and worth any light wear that occurs.
 
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I down shift and engine brake and always have. My Escort had 320,000km on the original clutch and transmission when I drove it onto the scale at the auto wreckers... RIP...

If you're doing it properly, say, on your commute, you likely won't have a problem. Racing is another story. Being a terrible driver is another story.
 

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I heard engine braking is good for putting additional stress on your drivetrain in order to protect your brake pads from additional wear.
That's funny

But engine breaking doesn't necessarily mean downshifting. Just letting your foot off the accelerator induces engine breaking. Downshifting amplifies it.

My old SVT Focus (ford's attempt at a VTEC) also had epic engine breaking. I challenged myself to go to Blockbuster one time without using the brakes. I succeeded. Those were the days...
 

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Just rev match your downshifts and there is no wear on your clutch. What's the difference if your clutch is engaged while your engine is slowing down or engaged while your engine is speeding up. If you cannot shift properly or have a hard time rev matching then I can see some extra wear.
 

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I heard engine braking is good for putting additional stress on your drivetrain in order to protect your brake pads from additional wear.
This has to be the most uneducated response I have ever seen. You do realize just how much stress the engine is under during normal operation right? It's a controlled series of explosions...

Let's break this down, when engine breaking or slowing down fuel supply is essentially shut off to the cylinders during times of accelerator pedal lift-off...the rotation of the engine acts as an air pump, applying the accelerator pedal commands fuel distribution when continues the engines rotation. Downshifting the vehicle to aid in breaking has no negative effects on the engine or driveline, all your doing in reconnecting the driveline to the engine which is WAY less stressful during deceleration as compared to acceleration.

I'm so baffled by this comment...I can't fathom how someone would believe that, do yourself a favor and familiarize yourself with the fundamental principles of engine operation (intake/compression/power/exhaust)...then graduate on engine mathematics for exceeding load tolerances above atmospheric pressure I.E. boost...do that and then ask yourself if deceleration is harder on the engine or drivetrain

Just because you post on the forums doesn't make you an expert, don't give people wrong information
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I heard engine braking is good for putting additional stress on your drivetrain in order to protect your brake pads from additional wear.
This has to be the most uneducated response I have ever seen. You do realize just how much stress the engine is under during normal operation right? It's a controlled series of explosions...

Let's break this down, when engine breaking or slowing down fuel supply is essentially shut off to the cylinders during times of accelerator pedal lift-off...the rotation of the engine acts as an air pump, applying the accelerator pedal commands fuel distribution when continues the engines rotation. Downshifting the vehicle to aid in breaking has no negative effects on the engine or driveline, all your doing in reconnecting the driveline to the engine which is WAY less stressful during deceleration as compared to acceleration.

I'm so baffled by this comment...I can't fathom how someone would believe that, do yourself a favor and familiarize yourself with the fundamental principles of engine operation (intake/compression/power/exhaust)...then graduate on engine mathematics for exceeding load tolerances above atmospheric pressure I.E. boost...do that and then ask yourself if deceleration is harder on the engine or drivetrain

Just because you post on the forums doesn't make you an expert, don't give people wrong information
This is fantastic! Thank you haha. I only ask because my 6speed vr6 had incredible engine braking and had a dual mass flywheel as well as a similar compression ratio. Maybe the drivetrain in these cars are just so efficient you just don't see the engine braking many of us are used to.
 
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i drive 120 miles a day to work and back in 40 min of stop and go traffic and i will rev- match my downshifts down to 2nd or 3rd every single time. I would rather keep the car in the correct gear in case of an emergency then just coast in Neutral. you never know when you will need to slam the gas and move over a lane to avoid an accident. if you know how to do a proper rev-match then there should be no issues.
 

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I heard engine braking is good for putting additional stress on your drivetrain in order to protect your brake pads from additional wear.
This has to be the most uneducated response I have ever seen. You do realize just how much stress the engine is under during normal operation right? It's a controlled series of explosions...

Let's break this down, when engine breaking or slowing down fuel supply is essentially shut off to the cylinders during times of accelerator pedal lift-off...the rotation of the engine acts as an air pump, applying the accelerator pedal commands fuel distribution when continues the engines rotation. Downshifting the vehicle to aid in breaking has no negative effects on the engine or driveline, all your doing in reconnecting the driveline to the engine which is WAY less stressful during deceleration as compared to acceleration.

I'm so baffled by this comment...I can't fathom how someone would believe that, do yourself a favor and familiarize yourself with the fundamental principles of engine operation (intake/compression/power/exhaust)...then graduate on engine mathematics for exceeding load tolerances above atmospheric pressure I.E. boost...do that and then ask yourself if deceleration is harder on the engine or drivetrain

Just because you post on the forums doesn't make you an expert, don't give people wrong information
The poster could of been less of a smart ass, but he said additional stress and agree it's not much if down shifting properly.

It's also a controlled burn, not an explosion. That would be detonation.
 

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I heard engine braking is good for putting additional stress on your drivetrain in order to protect your brake pads from additional wear.
This has to be the most uneducated response I have ever seen. You do realize just how much stress the engine is under during normal operation right? It's a controlled series of explosions...

Let's break this down, when engine breaking or slowing down fuel supply is essentially shut off to the cylinders during times of accelerator pedal lift-off...the rotation of the engine acts as an air pump, applying the accelerator pedal commands fuel distribution when continues the engines rotation. Downshifting the vehicle to aid in breaking has no negative effects on the engine or driveline, all your doing in reconnecting the driveline to the engine which is WAY less stressful during deceleration as compared to acceleration.

I'm so baffled by this comment...I can't fathom how someone would believe that, do yourself a favor and familiarize yourself with the fundamental principles of engine operation (intake/compression/power/exhaust)...then graduate on engine mathematics for exceeding load tolerances above atmospheric pressure I.E. boost...do that and then ask yourself if deceleration is harder on the engine or drivetrain

Just because you post on the forums doesn't make you an expert, don't give people wrong information
The poster could of been less of a smart ass, but he said additional stress and agree it's not much if down shifting properly.

It's also a controlled burn, not an explosion. That would be detonation.
Actually I said a controlled series of explosions, emphasis on controlled. Detonation is an ignition event outside of controlled and/or ideal parameters.
 
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