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From reading about an epic build where one brave soul pieced 2 focus' together to make one hot hatch (I can't find the link but it is here somewhere), we learned that the intake valves carbon up fairly quickly. My FoST is approaching 15k miles, and I think it is time I start addressing this issue.

I just happen to come across an ad in Sports Car for CRC GDI IVD Intake valve cleaner. Of course the online tutorial makes it sound like rainbows and butterflies ......

I really want to know if anyone has tried this, and does it work?

I tried to search through here, but I could not find anything on this topic.

This is also my first time ever creating a topic on a forum so please forgive me if I did something wrong :serious:

Thanks for your help!
 

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From reading about an epic build where one brave soul pieced 2 focus' together to make one hot hatch (I can't find the link but it is here somewhere), we learned that the intake valves carbon up fairly quickly. My FoST is approaching 15k miles, and I think it is time I start addressing this issue.

I just happen to come across an ad in Sports Car for CRC GDI IVD Intake valve cleaner. Of course the online tutorial makes it sound like rainbows and butterflies ......

I really want to know if anyone has tried this, and does it work?

I tried to search through here, but I could not find anything on this topic.

This is also my first time ever creating a topic on a forum so please forgive me if I did something wrong :serious:

Thanks for your help!
http://www.focusst.org/forum/focus-st-maintenance/35752-oil-catch-can-vs-no-oil-catch-can-pictures.html

I have done this and it does work. Remove the intake manifold. Be sure the valve you're working on is closed. Unplug the coils and turn over the engine until the valve is closed. Spray the cleaner onto the valve and valve stem. After the gunk has been dissolved by the cleaner, use shop rags and a Shop Vac to remove any debris before moving on to the next valve. Simply repeat the process with the remaining valves.
 

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From reading about an epic build where one brave soul pieced 2 focus' together to make one hot hatch (I can't find the link but it is here somewhere), we learned that the intake valves carbon up fairly quickly. My FoST is approaching 15k miles, and I think it is time I start addressing this issue.

I just happen to come across an ad in Sports Car for CRC GDI IVD Intake valve cleaner. Of course the online tutorial makes it sound like rainbows and butterflies ......

I really want to know if anyone has tried this, and does it work?

I tried to search through here, but I could not find anything on this topic.

This is also my first time ever creating a topic on a forum so please forgive me if I did something wrong :serious:

Thanks for your help!
http://www.focusst.org/forum/focus-st-maintenance/32284-valve-coking.html
 

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Although this product may work well given some soak time (as stated above), it was NOT effective for me when following the spray-thru the intake tract directions on the can. I was spraying in just ahead of intercooler. I'll probably try the soak and manual clean method in the near future.
 

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I just used Gunk engine degreaser.

I sprayed the valves, and let it sit for a good 30 minutes. Take your spark plugs out so you don't need to worry about accidentally hydrolocking an open cylinder (although it takes a lot of this stuff to do that so just use common sense).

You don't need to do anything other than let the valves soak. Once you start the engine back up the vacuum will suck all the crud off the valves and it will burn off during combustion. My car smoked and smelled terrible for a good 20 minutes but the valves were spotless afterwards.

Inb4 "b-b-but the turbo seals" or "that's bad for the cat because I'm an internet scientist"
 

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I just used Gunk engine degreaser.

I sprayed the valves, and let it sit for a good 30 minutes. Take your spark plugs out so you don't need to worry about accidentally hydrolocking an open cylinder (although it takes a lot of this stuff to do that so just use common sense).

You don't need to do anything other than let the valves soak. Once you start the engine back up the vacuum will suck all the crud off the valves and it will burn off during combustion. My car smoked and smelled terrible for a good 20 minutes but the valves were spotless afterwards.

Inb4 "b-b-but the turbo seals" or "that's bad for the cat because I'm an internet scientist"
It's not bad for the seals, but it's bad for the turbine wheel to be hit with all the crap that many not burn off fully.
 

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It's not bad for the seals, but it's bad for the turbine wheel to be hit with all the crap that many not burn off fully.
What crap though? The deposits are dissolved by the degreaser and should be vaporized and burned off in the combustion process. I could see if you scrapped dry deposits off and those were sucked into the cylinder in a dry state but if they were dissolved it's hard to imagine that they would reach the turbine wheel in particle form.
 

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What crap though? The deposits are dissolved by the degreaser and should be vaporized and burned off in the combustion process. I could see if you scrapped dry deposits off and those were sucked into the cylinder in a dry state but if they were dissolved it's hard to imagine that they would reach the turbine wheel in particle form.
Good point! I guess I'd have to see how well a job the degreaser does.
 

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I removed the intake and sprayed a little CRC on each valve. Did not turn the engine to close any of the valves. Only sprayed small amounts in each port. I have a catch can and had small amounts of build up. My ST has 12k miles. The build up was desolved. Put it back together and fired it up. It stunk for a few minutes then cleared up. I removed the catch can and switched to a breather plate which is a lot less work than emptying a catch can. I’ll be performing this procedure ever 10k miles. I think it a lot better to clean it often then to let it build up.
 

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Just thought I would share my experience, or rather, my procedure to use this product. TBH, I am not sure how nasty my valves are but I know it's an issue on all GDI engines. I haven't chosen an OCC yet but I had heard about this product, so I figured I would give it a shot.

It says it's safe for turbo's and superchargers but I didn't want to put it in the air intake and have it run all the way through the intercooler and possibly damage the MAF sensor.

I had a CP-E MAP Tap kit laying around and decided to give this a shot, I put the smallest barb on the MAP Tap and installed it. I then hooked up a piece of 3/16th fuel line to the Tap and put the nozzle of the CRC bottle into the line.

Started the engine and got a piece of wood, put it against the seat frame and used the electric seats to move forward lightly pinching the wood against the gas pedal until my RPM's were right around 2,000 RPM...didn't have anyone to help me today so I had to get creative... I started pumping the CRC into the intake manifold. By doing it this way there is no way you can do 30 second intervals because the engine will choke and die so I just did many short bursts, then let the engine idle, then back to short bursts until the bottle was almost gone. Gave the engine a few revs like the can says but then I went back to giving it a few more short intervals and lastly did the seafoam trick and just sprayed the last of the can in until the engine choked and died and let it sit for what CRC calls the 'heat soak.'

I took the hour of waiting time to change my spark plugs for the first time ever in this car.

Once I was done, I started it up and drove it on the highway for 10+ minutes and then at the end I did a good 4th gear pull. Then I started back home, driving normally to let everything settle down.

My observations:
Plenty of smoke and black crap came out of the exhaust, smelled bad...kinda reminded me of just fired gun powder....dirty gun powder.
Did cause a 02 sensor code that the AP picked up for running rich. Cleared it, hasn't come back.
Idle is smoother, like hard to tell if the car is running smooth. Can't say this was just the CRC because I decided to change plugs at the same time so not 100%

Finally, the car runs just fine. I wish I had the time to pull the manifold to do a before and after but this post was mainly meant to add another possible way to introduce this product straight into the intake. I would imagine the symposer delete would work too if you wanted to do it that way. The CP-E MAP Tap is neat because it's a spare vacuum source and once I was done, I just put a plug and clamp over the little barb. Anyway, hope this helps, I did take some pictures on my phone if anyone wants to see them let me know.
 

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Crc may not be as effective as walnut blasting but it is a much easier, cheaper way in my opinion. The first time I used a half a can sprayed straight through the intake. Barely made a difference at all. The second time I bought a Radium Engineering symposer delete with the 1/8 vacuum reference nipple, attached a vacuum line to it that was long enough to reach the cabin of my car, inserted the straw of the intake valve cleaner, and followed the instructions on the bottle. Inspected and took pictures of the valves before and after and they do look cleaner, not perfect but it made a difference. I feel like if I had a catch can and added the crc to my regular maintenance schedule with the oil change they would stay pretty clean but havent gotten around to it yet. My experience so far has been positive
 
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