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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys,

Noob question I'm sure, but couldn't find a clear answer via search bar. Can someone tell me the difference between having a DFlow filter or SynoilD? I understand one is dry and other oiled, but what is the benefit one vs the other? They are the same price... Lastly if you do own a CP-E Cold Air intake let me hear your feedback because I am very interesting in purchasing.

Cheers!

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Hi Guys,

Noob question I'm sure, but couldn't find a clear answer via search bar. Can someone tell me the difference between having a DFlow filter or SynoilD? I understand one is dry and other oiled, but what is the benefit one vs the other? They are the same price... Lastly if you do own a CP-E Cold Air intake let me hear your feedback because I am very interesting in purchasing.

Cheers!

View attachment 250017
I run a CP-E w/ Synoil-D. It's preference for me to have the oiled filter. By theory, oiled filters flow better and trap more particles. I also run the pre-filter. BTW, the CP-E sounds so bad ass ....

This is from CP-E:
Synoil = our oiled filter
DFlow = our dry filter
Technically the Oiled filter will trap more dirt/particles than the dry filter, it will also allow slightly more air flow. The downsides are maintenance, you have to clean it more often and be careful NOT to over oil the filter. Being oiled it is a bit messier.
The dry flow there's no oil to worry about getting dried out. Cleaning is a bit easier since there's no oil to worry about. With both you can buy our prefilter, which basically is a nylon sock that fits over your filter, it's water resistant and also blocks a lot of the larger particles that might get lodged in your filter.

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IMG_0296.JPG
 
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dry filter all the way. not that cleaning an oiled filter is terribly difficult, but dry is way easier to maintain, filters better. Oiled flows more when new, but when the are fresh like that, they do not filter as well. Over time their performance goes down and filtration improves-- this is why you don't want to clean the filter too often, every 5k miles or something like that. Lots of tests done before on the internet, google it.

air filter is not going to be a flow restrictions, so I would recommend dry for simplicity and better filtration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I run a CP-E w/ Synoil-D. It's preference for me to have the oiled filter. By theory, oiled filters flow better and trap more particles. I also run the pre-filter. BTW, the CP-E sounds so bad ass ....

This is from CP-E:
Synoil = our oiled filter
DFlow = our dry filter
Technically the Oiled filter will trap more dirt/particles than the dry filter, it will also allow slightly more air flow. The downsides are maintenance, you have to clean it more often and be careful NOT to over oil the filter. Being oiled it is a bit messier.
The dry flow there's no oil to worry about getting dried out. Cleaning is a bit easier since there's no oil to worry about. With both you can buy our prefilter, which basically is a nylon sock that fits over your filter, it's water resistant and also blocks a lot of the larger particles that might get lodged in your filter.

View attachment 250081
View attachment 250089
Thanks for all the info! This is a tremendous help. Engine bay looks sick on your car!
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
dry filter all the way. not that cleaning an oiled filter is terribly difficult, but dry is way easier to maintain, filters better. Oiled flows more when new, but when the are fresh like that, they do not filter as well. Over time their performance goes down and filtration improves

Thank you for the great info, cheers!
 
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