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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got little to no experience with 3D printing, but I do have access to a 3D printer at the University I attend. So if I printed a Spacer would the standard filament of a 3D printer be sturdy enough for a spacer?
 

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Yeah it would be I have one that was 3D printed that I bought off of cali st, it is like a quarter inch thick and has a few pieces of Velcro on it to grab the carpet... you could really do anything and stick a few pieces on it. Post up some pictures when you Finnish I am sure there are others that might be interested in what you come up with.
 

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I am pretty sure there was a link to download the file on thingverse or something floating around on one of the pedal spacer threads. The one I have is 3-d printed or at least seems it. Just buy a few bolts for it and you'd have the same thing.
 

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Yeah it would be I have one that was 3D printed that I bought off of cali st, it is like a quarter inch thick and has a few pieces of Velcro on it to grab the carpet... you could really do anything and stick a few pieces on it. Post up some pictures when you Finnish I am sure there are others that might be interested in what you come up with.
Velcroing a pedal spacer on seems shifty...are you thinking about a dead pedal?
 

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I'm assuming you're doing this for the accelerator or dead pedal. Clutch and brake are a different story because they experience more pressure. Almost any common 3D material is good enough. ABS, what's used in legos, PLA, or Nylon are all going to be sufficient. Just be careful how you make it. Your infill (amount of material inside) is important. At 0% infill, you're making an eggshell. Shoot for some thing like 15-25% at a minimum. Less layers will make it finer. Finer is nice and I believe will reduce the chance for delamination. You need to design the part first. Make sure you do not have overhangs, since they can affect the structural integrity of the part. And 3D printing is orientation dependent, so just keep in mind that layers are weaker in the horizontal direction than vertical. Don't make your part stupid thin. You can always just show me a picture of the part and I'll let you know if there are any issues for 3D printing.

Source: Mechanical engineer.
 

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I'm assuming you're doing this for the accelerator or dead pedal. Clutch and brake are a different story because they experience more pressure. Almost any common 3D material is good enough. ABS, what's used in legos, PLA, or Nylon are all going to be sufficient. Just be careful how you make it. Your infill (amount of material inside) is important. At 0% infill, you're making an eggshell. Shoot for some thing like 15-25% at a minimum. Less layers will make it finer. Finer is nice and I believe will reduce the chance for delamination. You need to design the part first. Make sure you do not have overhangs, since they can affect the structural integrity of the part. And 3D printing is orientation dependent, so just keep in mind that layers are weaker in the horizontal direction than vertical. Don't make your part stupid thin. You can always just show me a picture of the part and I'll let you know if there are any issues for 3D printing.

Source: Mechanical engineer.
lol, I love the fact another ME is looking at this at this time of the night. ;P

OP, If you want help with design ask one of us, As I am also a Mechanical Engineer. But this project is 100% doable, ABS is my preferred between ABS and PLA, as it is stronger when 3D printed. Source: Have built intakes for engines that back fire through the intake(during initial tuning), that survived a very long time after.
 

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BTW, OP, I made mine out of laser-cut Delrin because I wanted to make mine left and right adjustable, and I couldn't really 3D print that since the 3D printer was too small. Delrin's strong and laser cutting is fast. Just something to consider.
 

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BTW, OP, I made mine out of laser-cut Delrin because I wanted to make mine left and right adjustable, and I couldn't really 3D print that since the 3D printer was too small. Delrin's strong and laser cutting is fast. Just something to consider.
Could I have this file? Also do u have any installed pics for the relative height change?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
What was the infill? And why are the holes not through? Otherwise, it looks good to me from a quick glance
So I think you mean what is inside by infill? It should be 100% solid the whole way through.

The mounting holes are all the way through, Im not sure why there are the 2 little recesses though. I just used the file I found online.
 

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I have quite a bit of 3d printing experience and let me give you some pointers. For materials in a car, you really should be printing with polycarbonate. PLA filament should not be used in a car as it will most certainly deform on a hot day in a car. ABS filament also should probably not be used and I don't work with it much because of the warping issues and the nano particles released why printing and noxious fumes. PETG filament is generally my favorite filament of choice and is a good material for car items unless they are in the hottest of summer days when temperatures are in excess of 160F inside a car. The transition point is generally around 190F so I always have a buffer when it comes to objects softening because of heat.

The optimal material for you pedal in terms of handling heat and also force would generally be polycarbonate. This material glass transition is around 300F so you are good to go. Your pinter would need an all metal hot end and a nozzle temp of over 300C generally and a bed temp of around 120C to extrude properly
 
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