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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Someone recently told me that the ST has seat belt pretensioner cinch mode on both the passenger and driver side OEM belts. I am a tad skeptical this is actually the case. Can someone confirm this on the driver side of their car?

I have an RS which does not have cinch mode on the driver side. If the ST does have it, I'll be tempted to order a driver side ST pretensioner assembly.

Thanks for your help.

Jacob
 

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Are you talking about when you pull the seat belt all the way out so it locks when it retracts? If that's the case, no, my 2013 ST does not have that on the driver's side. When I started autocross, my friend that got me into it said to alleviate that issue until I get a proper harness is to twist the seat belt at the buckle a few times to hold it in place.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Are you talking about when you pull the seat belt all the way out so it locks when it retracts? If that's the case, no, my 2013 ST does not have that on the driver's side. When I started autocross, my friend that got me into it said to alleviate that issue until I get a proper harness is to twist the seat belt at the buckle a few times to hold it in place.

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Yes, that is what I mean by cinch mode.
 

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Do they do this in the front seats of any vehicles anymore? I only see two scenarios where this is needed 1) car seat, and it's going to be in the back seat anyway, or c) you need to strap in a crazy person...or a zombie. Again I feel like you would put them in the back.
 

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Do they do this in the front seats of any vehicles anymore? I only see two scenarios where this is needed 1) car seat, and it's going to be in the back seat anyway, or c) you need to strap in a crazy person...or a zombie. Again I feel like you would put them in the back.
No one allowed in the back seat of my car...crazy folks and zombies must ride up front like everyone else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Do they do this in the front seats of any vehicles anymore? I only see two scenarios where this is needed 1) car seat, and it's going to be in the back seat anyway, or c) you need to strap in a crazy person...or a zombie. Again I feel like you would put them in the back.
Cinch mode is very nice to have in autocrossing if you don't have an aftermarket harness. GM provides this on both sides on the Z06.
 

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But in newer cars isn't there a "auto-lock" feature or something when you are going around a fast curve or stopping rapidly? I know my ST belts used to lock up on an off-ramp loop I used to take at a pretty good speed
 

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But in newer cars isn't there a "auto-lock" feature or something when you are going around a fast curve or stopping rapidly? I know my ST belts used to lock up on an off-ramp loop I used to take at a pretty good speed
Yeah I think that's been fairly standard for a while. My ST has nearly choked me to death a couple times while braking hard

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I believe my 2014 ST will allow you to inertia-lock the driver belt, same as my BMW and several other cars I've owned. I'll check when I get home, but I remember autocrossing with the belt locked. This is accomplished by getting secure in the belt, tightening it as much as possible, then snapping it away from the B pillar quickly to engage the inertia lock. It works best if you slide the seat back, then lock the belt, then slide the seat forwards to add more tension. Most every car I've driven since the '90s has this.

This is different from the rear belts that begin to ratchet down after being extended a certain amount.
 

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I believe my 2014 ST will allow you to inertia-lock the driver belt, same as my BMW and several other cars I've owned. I'll check when I get home, but I remember autocrossing with the belt locked. This is accomplished by getting secure in the belt, tightening it as much as possible, then snapping it away from the B pillar quickly to engage the inertia lock. It works best if you slide the seat back, then lock the belt, then slide the seat forwards to add more tension. Most every car I've driven since the '90s has this.

This is different from the rear belts that begin to ratchet down after being extended a certain amount.

i learned this from an instructor in 05 when i was doing hpde in my neon srt-4. it worked really well in those seats I'm sure it works just as good in the st2/3 seats.
 

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I definitely remember reading in the user manual or somewhere. Our seatbelts will in fact lock under high G-force. There is supposedly a system that detects high amounts of G-forces (reserved for crashes) and will lock the belts tight within 1/10 a millisecond or something, similar to air bags. If I remember right it really does not activate itself under normal usage but it is there in an emergency. Obviously not designed for track use.

I am hoping fretbumr is right, with the proper snap you can activate ratchet mode which accomplishes what you seek. Never tested it but sounds familiar to any car I have ever owned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
So here I have confirmed what was being discussed:

2016 Focus Owner's Manual:

Vehicle Sensitive Mode This is the normal retractor mode, which allows free shoulder belt length adjustment to your movements and locking in response to vehicle movement. For example, if the driver brakes suddenly or turns a corner sharply, or the vehicle receives an impact of about 5 mph (8 km/h) or more, the combination safety belts will lock to help reduce forward movement of the driver and passengers. In addition, the retractor is designed to lock if the webbing is pulled out too quickly. If this occurs, let the belt retract slightly and pull webbing out again in a slow and controlled manner.

Automatic Locking Mode In this mode, the shoulder belt is automatically pre-locked. The belt will still retract to remove any slack in the shoulder belt. The automatic locking mode is not available on the driver safety belt. When to Use the Automatic Locking Mode This mode should be used any time a child safety seat, except a booster, is installed in passenger front or rear seating positions. Children 12 years old and under should be properly restrained in a rear seating position whenever possible.

To me the lack of automatic locking on the driver side is a design deficiency.
 

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Well, I wrecked/likely-totaled my 2017 ST the other night, i can attest that the seat belt WILL cinch up in the event of an accident... so if that's a concern, it shouldn't be
 

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Well, I wrecked/likely-totaled my 2017 ST the other night, i can attest that the seat belt WILL cinch up in the event of an accident... so if that's a concern, it shouldn't be
That's terrible to hear, did anyone get hurt? Could we perhaps see some pics out of curiosity's sake?

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It was just my car, just me inside, i slid off US129 (Tail of the Dragon) into a 2 foot ditch. While it was all a blur, I definitely did not get thrown forward, the seat belt definitely kept me in my spot. Side curtain airbags deployed to catch my fall (the car ended up at a 45 degree angle) the steering wheel airbag or a-pillar airbags did not deploy, I guess there wasn't enough front impact to trigger that. I have pictures but they really wouldn't apply to the question at hand in this thread, but I wanted to note that while you can't manually cinch the driver seat belt, it definitely automatically cinches as designed.
 

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I definitely remember reading in the user manual or somewhere. Our seatbelts will in fact lock under high G-force. There is supposedly a system that detects high amounts of G-forces (reserved for crashes) and will lock the belts tight within 1/10 a millisecond or something, similar to air bags. If I remember right it really does not activate itself under normal usage but it is there in an emergency. Obviously not designed for track use.

I am hoping fretbumr is right, with the proper snap you can activate ratchet mode which accomplishes what you seek. Never tested it but sounds familiar to any car I have ever owned.
The seatbelt inertia locks can absolutely be activated with a quick snap. I tested it on both sides.
 

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DIY Seatbelt Cinch

After doing my first autocross this weekend and getting thrown all over the place in the seat, I came here looking for solutions. The CG Lock seemed to fit the bill, but does not seem to work with the seat buckles in my 2017. The Schroth 4-point harness looked really cool, but kind of lost its allure with the $380 price tag. Being a somewhat handy guy with tools, I decided to try and find another (read cheap) alternative. After digging through the "random fastener" drawer of my tool box, I spied a simple brass hinge from an interior door. The outermost holes neatly straddled the width of the seatbelt so I decided to give it a try.

For the first step, I hack sawed off the pinned hinge from the section with the holes. Forgive my funky cut-lines, this is for function, not beauty:

Hardware accessory Hinge Metal

Next, I used a dremel tool to smooth the edges of the cut pieces so they would not snag on the belt, clothes, skin, etc.:

Metal Hardware accessory

For the next step I decided to add a little grip to the plates so that the finished assembly would not slide on the belt so easily. I opted for 220 grit sandpaper, since that's what I had in the toolbox. I cut and glued the sandpaper to fit the inside of the plates between the outermost holes as shown below:



Here are all the parts I used. The bolts are 3/4 inch machine bolts, with lock-washers and wingnuts to hold it all together:



And finally, here is the finished product in place on the seatbelt:

Vehicle Auto part Car Automotive exterior Bumper


Like I said before, the purpose was not to make something to win an engineering award, but rather a practical, DIY solution to sliding all over the seat during autocross.



JD
 
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