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Hello all, I am approaching 1,000 miles on my ST. Should I dump the oil at this mileage and go full synthetic? Thanks.
2016 Focus ST in Tangerine Scream.
 

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Not worth the trouble imo.
Just follow your maintenance interval.
Change to Full Synth at your first change.
Use Wix filters, or K&N, and preload em.

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I changed my oil and filter after 2000 miles. Then I went to a full synthetic (Amsoil) and had an oil analysis done after my 2nd oil change at 9000 miles

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I always change the oil on a new motor somewhere around 500 miles and again at 1000. this will be the time when the most wear occurs in the motor. after that on to the normal schedule.

a good example, after the new Z06 came out a couple of years ago, people started having an unusually high amount(just under 1%) of engine failures often between only 800-1500 miles. Chevy officially changed their break in procedure to include changing the oil after only 500 miles because of the amount of all the tiny metal flakes from the bearings and cylinders as those brand new parts get worn in.

“We now encourage all owners to change their oil at 500 miles to remove possible contaminants created during the engine break-in process. And, as always, we encourage the use of Mobil 1 synthetic oil – which is a factory fill for all Z06 models, and Stingray Z51 models – and encourage owners to follow the engine break-in process detailed in the owner’s manual,” stated Monte Doran, spokesman for Chevrolet.


also its cheap insurance, so after spending $25k-$30k on a higher performing car, why wouldn't you just spend the $30 or so to do it?
 

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I just changed mine for the first time last week (2500 miles). I just used Motorcraft 5w-30 synth-blend and the FL-400s filter. Going to run that until 5k, then I'll go full synthetic.
 

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I always change the oil on a new motor somewhere around 500 miles and again at 1000. this will be the time when the most wear occurs in the motor. after that on to the normal schedule.

a good example, after the new Z06 came out a couple of years ago, people started having an unusually high amount(just under 1%) of engine failures often between only 800-1500 miles. Chevy officially changed their break in procedure to include changing the oil after only 500 miles because of the amount of all the tiny metal flakes from the bearings and cylinders as those brand new parts get worn in.

“We now encourage all owners to change their oil at 500 miles to remove possible contaminants created during the engine break-in process. And, as always, we encourage the use of Mobil 1 synthetic oil – which is a factory fill for all Z06 models, and Stingray Z51 models – and encourage owners to follow the engine break-in process detailed in the owner’s manual,” stated Monte Doran, spokesman for Chevrolet.


also its cheap insurance, so after spending $25k-$30k on a higher performing car, why wouldn't you just spend the $30 or so to do it?
I find it a little odd that this stuff gets past the filter. Actually, more that a little odd. If the filter isn't filtering out particles that can damage your motor then what's happening with the little dirt particulates that cause wear? I think GM is barking up the wrong tree. Not that the metal flakes can't do damage, just that I think they're in places where they do that damage during the first 500 miles, then get flushed to the pan and filtered out. I'm still trying to sort this out in my mind. Nope, don't make no sense at all.
 
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during cold starts the oil filter bypass can let oil through unfiltered for a bit. On new engines you will have break in particles circulating around from the assembly process and what not. I always change fluids early on new engines, differentials, etc. Its not gonna hurt anything to be cautious. I changed mine out at about 2200 miles. A similar, but maybe off topic, example is when replacing headgaskets, there are oem repair procedures that want you to drive for 15 miles, then change the oil and filter to flush out any possible cross contamination of coolant and engine oil.
 

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I find it a little odd that this stuff gets past the filter. Actually, more that a little odd. If the filter isn't filtering out particles that can damage your motor then what's happening with the little dirt particulates that cause wear? I think GM is barking up the wrong tree. Not that the metal flakes can't do damage, just that I think they're in places where they do that damage during the first 500 miles, then get flushed to the pan and filtered out. I'm still trying to sort this out in my mind. Nope, don't make no sense at all.
unfortunately oil filters are not 100% efficient, this is one of the reasons you can have an oil filter on your car and when its time to change the oil, it can be dark in color. the size of particulates that can cause the most damage are in the 2-25 micron range, and most filters are only around 90% efficient at 15 microns, and 60%-70% effective at catching particles larger than 7 microns. catching all the super small particles is extremely difficult to do because for the filter media to be able to catch particles as small as 2 microns, it would not flow oil very well and then your going to have a much bigger problem on your hands.

but I'm sure your in a much better place to explain and solve it vs the team of engineers over at the old bow tie lab that actually got to tear apart these motors to diagnose what the problem was with them. guessing what the problem is (and guessing wrong) isn't a great business model when you are talking about all these motors that cost $16k each.
 

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I did my first change at 1200 miles to Amsoil full synthetic. I'm from the school that you always do the first change early in case there are any contaminants from production. If I'm wrong, I threw away $60 on the oil and filter. If I'm right, I saved a $7k engine. Only time I would not do the change early is if the mfr. was using a break-in oil and recommended a specific mileage before changing.

I also wanted to change to a full synthetic as soon as possible because it is a DI engine and it gave me an excuse to get under the car and poke around.
 

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unfortunately oil filters are not 100% efficient, this is one of the reasons you can have an oil filter on your car and when its time to change the oil, it can be dark in color. the size of particulates that can cause the most damage are in the 2-25 micron range, and most filters are only around 90% efficient at 15 microns, and 60%-70% effective at catching particles larger than 7 microns. catching all the super small particles is extremely difficult to do because for the filter media to be able to catch particles as small as 2 microns, it would not flow oil very well and then your going to have a much bigger problem on your hands.

but I'm sure your in a much better place to explain and solve it vs the team of engineers over at the old bow tie lab that actually got to tear apart these motors to diagnose what the problem was with them. guessing what the problem is (and guessing wrong) isn't a great business model when you are talking about all these motors that cost $16k each.
You callin' me a smart-ass know it all? I resemble that remark!!
 
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