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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Okay. So first up, let's just address the elephant in the room:
The directions suck. They are vague (except on two important points- the torque spec of the oil pickup tube and the bolt for the balance shaft delete plug), and necessitate having the factory service manual (which is hopeless by itself!). So plan on making some educated guesses at a few things.
Difficulty: Moderate. This WILL involve dropping the oil pan, separating the engine and transmission (SLIGHTLY), moving the A/C, and a few other bits. If you're comfortable with minor surgery, feel free to proceed.

Tools needed:
Various metric sockets and wrenches. I HIGHLY recommend a set of ratcheting, adjustable-elbow wrenches in 15mm and 13mm for this job! Otherwise, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15mm sockets, an extension, and the aforementioned wrenches are crucial. You'll also need a T30 Torx bit for the undertray. You'll need a flathead screwdriver to remove the charge pipe hose clamps (if they're anything like mine, a stubby will be a must, as they'll be clocked in the worst possible direction!) Obviously, a jack and at least one jack stand are necessary unless you have a grease pit (you lucky SOB!). You'll also need lots of rags/towels and an oil drain pan. Also, you'll need a stretch belt installation and removal tool if you don't want to cut off and replace the A/C belt (around $10 from the dealership for a new belt, so not awful- sadly, I didn't have the tool, so I cut my belt :( ). You will also need black RTV sealant to re-seal the oil pan, and plastic gasket scrapers to remove the old sealant. Gloves are never a bad idea when working in tight spaces. A drop light would also help under there :) A smallish pry bar would be a good idea as well. Safety glasses are recommended any time you're underneath a car- you only get one set of eyes! You will need some red Loctite (blue is not water[oil]proof, nor is it as permanent). Lastly, you'll need an 8mm (M8) Allen key for the bolt for the BSD.

You'll also need oil (5W-30 synthetic blend, at least. I only run Motorcraft full synthetic, but your car- your choice!). I used ~6.5 quarts for mine, but have 7-8 quarts ready, just in case! Better to have too much than too little!

So, an up-front heads up:
If you are planning on doing this mod, there are three things you should consider doing at the same time:
1. An oil change. This mod involves removing the oil pan, so you'll be replacing the oil anyway, and removing the filter gives you a bit of extra knuckle room. You might as well...
2. Lower engine mount. You'll be removing all the hardware, anyway, so why not do it? I can recommend CFM's mount- just remove most/all of the inserts if you live anywhere that gets cold!
3. Charge pipes. I did this without removing the TB->IC pipe, but you're right there, anyway. You have to remove the turbo->IC pipe, anyway, so why not?


NOTE:
This guide assumes a permanent removal of the balance shaft assembly! If you MIGHT re-install it later, you will need to clock the assembly with your #1 piston at TDC! Otherwise re-installation may be quite a pain.
Also, as always, YMMV. This is a pretty good walkthrough (if I do say so myself), but you really should have the factory service manual (FSM) handy, as well as the included directions for your kit. I HIGHLY HIGHLY recommend you read through those as well as this COMPLETELY before starting work.

Prep:
Have a roll or two of the blue towels (or a buttload of rags) handy in various spots for this- you WILL be making a mess with oil for this one. Position them strategically in front of the car and in front of the front passenger wheel.

Jack up the car, and put jack stands under appropriate points (I only did the passenger side out of laziness, but doing both front wheels wouldn't be a bad idea, both for safety and working space).

With your T30 Torx bit, remove the undertray.

Now, here is one place where I found the FSM erroneous. It had you remove the airbox and unclip some clips to an A/C line. On my car, these were already unclipped, so this was a waste of time. YMMV.

Next, place your drain pan under the drain plug. It takes a 15mm socket/wrench. Let it drain for a while- the more it drains now, the less of a mess you're likely to make later! You won't get nearly all of the oil, but the more, the merrier!

If your pan is big enough (or if you have two), and you're replacing the oil filter, spin that bugger off and let it drain as well. Clean off the mating surface and threads while you're at it. This is always a good habit to get into.

After the oil stops draining, replace the drain plug loosely- just enough that it will hold itself in place

Next up is the A/C compressor to crank pulley belt. The FSM says to cut this belt. If you feel you must, go ahead. I have read there's a trick to getting this off with a 1/4" ratchet, but I'm afraid I don't know it (if you do, PLEASE post it up!). Or you can use a stretch belt removal tool. Either way, remove the A/C belt from the pulleys and set aside or discard.

Next, remove the charge pipes. The turbo-IC pipe has two hard mounting points- one front (10mm socket/wrench) and one rear (13mm socket/wrench) and a hose clamp at each soft pipe (flathead screwdriver). Remove the turbo-IC pipe. I found removing the TB-IC pipe unnecessary, but removing it WILL make the A/C compressor easier to remove and get out of the way, but it can be done without removing that pipe. YMMV.

NOTE: The following is optional, but it will make removing the A/C compressor easier. I'd recommend doing this only if you're removing the mount for replacement, or removing/adding inserts to your CFM mount (if that's what you have). Next up, remove the hardware for the engine-to-downpipe brackets. There are four nuts (13mm socket/wrench) that hold on the downpipe-side bracket- remove these first and wiggle that sucker out of there (it's a TIGHT fit- plan on gloves for this part if you don't want to bash your knuckles!). Next, remove the two nuts (13mm socket/wrench) holding on the engine-side bracket. Then, remove the three bolts holding in the engine-side lower engine mount (15mm socket/wrench- the rear two pretty much require a wrench). Then remove the two bolts (15mm socket/wrench) holding the body-side of the lower engine mount in, and remove the lower engine mount assembly.

Next, remove the three bolts (13mm socket/wrench) holding the A/C compressor on. Then, wiggle the compressor down off the mounting stud as best you can and secure it out of the way of the stud and oil pan.

Next up (here's where the FSM's vague pictures/diagrams start!), there are two bolts (13mm wrench/socket) on the rear of the engine next to the axle shaft and downpipe that need to be LOOSENED (NOT removed!). Do that. I'll wait... Then, there are two more bolts on the front of the engine next to the oil cooler (where the filter is) (13mm wrench/socket). Loosen these (NOT Remove). Then, remove the three lower transmission-to-engine bolts at the bottom (13mm socket/wrench) and the bolt/stud onto which the rear turbo-IC charge was mounted (13mm socket/wrench).

Here the FSM tells you to pry the engine/trans apart. There isn't an easy way to do this, but there is a SMALL vent hole at the bottom of the transmission at the mating surface. GENTLY pry here with a small pry bar or flathead screwdriver that fits. If at first you don't succeed, STOP! It's thinnish aluminum, and you WILL break parts off if you try to muscle them apart. You only need to be able to JUST move the engine/transmission apart a hair to ensure you don't damage the mating surfaces.

Next up, remove the four bolts on the crank pulley (passenger) side of the engine (8mm socket/wrench) into the oil pan.

Then, remove the thirteen bolts (10mm socket/wrench) that hold on the oil pan. Now do NOT expect the oil pan to drop free, but BE AWARE THAT IT COULD!!! It is VERY likely stuck in place, thanks to the RTV sealant (there is no gasket used), so you'll VERY LIKELY have to pry the pan loose. There are a few places to pry- do NOT try to shove/hammer something between the pan and block to pry it loose. Gently work it loose, using slight pressure alternating at various points/corners. Eventually, it WILL break free. Then, pull it down. This is where a helper would be handy- have them ready with rags/towels, as all of the oil in the crankcase will now pee out onto your floor. If you're working solo, set the pan aside and start mopping up. The oil WILL continue to drip, so a set of safety glasses will be a good choice here (if you didn't already have them on!).

Okay! Now you have two routes- oil pan prep/cleaning, or balance shaft assembly removal. I'd recommend removing the balance shafts first, and that's how we shall proceed here.

Next up, remove the two bolts holding on the oil pickup tube (8mm socket/wrench). Note: the pickup tube seems to be plastic, so BE CAREFUL! Set the pickup tube aside for now.

Now, remove the four bolts holding in the balance shaft assembly (14mm socket/wrench). Remove three first, leaving one last one loose. Then, put one hand under the balance shaft assembly (it weighs 12-15 pounds or more, so be ready!), and the other on your ratchet, and remove that last bolt. Be ready for oil to start seeping as you loosen/remove each bolt, by the way. There WILL be more oil inside the assembly, so you may want to prepare a nest of rags to put this on. Set the assembly and the bolts aside, or scrap them- they won't be going back in.

Okay- now, the reason we're here! Grab the bolt and plate balance shaft delete kit. Put a small amount of red Loctite on the threads of the bolt, and a dab of CLEAN oil on the O-ring on the plate of the BSD. The hole into which the kit will be installed is on the front of the block in a recess, so I'd recommend an extension or very long Allen key. Sadly, I forget the size of the Allen socket I used for the CFM BSD (M8, perhaps?), but you can check this prior to beginning. Please do to ensure you have the tool you need! Torque this bolt to 18 lb.-ft.

Next, re-install the oil pickup tube, and torque the bolts (8mm socket) to 8 lb.-ft.

Now, the fun part. Get out your gasket scraper and remove all of the old sealant material from the crankcase side and from the oil pan. It's very tacky stuff, so plan on this taking a while. NOTE: Use PLASTIC scrapers ONLY, or you will risk damaging your mating surfaces, as both parts are aluminum. Next, run a 3mm bead of black RTV sealant around the mating surfaces of the oil pan.

Now, ASAP, re-install the oil pan onto the block and hand-tighten in the thirteen bolts that held it to the crankcase. You have ~8-10 minutes before the RTV starts to harden. If for some reason you can't make this timeline, remove the RTV and start again.

Now you need to torque the oil pan back on. Torque in a criss-cross pattern- the recommended pattern is listed in the FSM (anybody want to post a picture?), but a general crosswise pattern will be good, like with any flange.

The rest of the process is the reverse of removal. Torque specs are below. I would recommend leaving the undertray off for a bit while you run the engine to check for leakage. Check your dipstick after your initial startup, and add oil as necessary- I started with 6.25 quarts, and only had to add ~1/4 quart more. Some have used more, closer to 7 quarts- YMMV (this is why I recommended having 7-8 quarts on hand). After you top off the oil level, take the car off of the jack stands, and take the car for a test drive, keeping an eye on the oil pressure gauges. Make a few stops and look under the front for leaks. After a few miles, head home, and jack it back up (with jack stands), and check again for leakage. If you have none, WELL DONE! Re-install the undertray, and enjoy! :)

Torque specs: (Presented in the order in which they should be installed/torqued)
The four bolts under the crank pulley take 10Nm (7-8 lb.-ft.) of torque
The thirteen bolts on the bottom of the oil pan take 20Nm (15 lb.-ft.) of torque
Bellhousing (transmission)-to-engine bolts (13mm- alternate from front/back bolts here! These are the bolts you merely loosened) take 48 Nm (35 lb.-ft.) of torque
The three lower transmission-to-engine bolts you fully removed also take 48 Nm (35 lb.-ft.) of torque
The A/C compressor mounting stud needs to be torqued to 9Nm initially (~5-6 lb.-ft.), then when you install the two bolts, all three are torqued to 25 Nm (18 lb.-ft.) of torque
The vertical bolt through the rear engine-to-body mount should initially be torqued to 30 Nm (22 lb.-ft.) of torque, then turned a further 270 degrees after the cross bolt (below) is torqued in place.
NOTE: Here I again disagree with the FSM. I loosely installed all of the bolts for the rear engine-to-body mount and block side mount, THEN torqued things down. This will make things MUCH easier!
Block-side mount cross-bolt takes 85 Nm (62-3 lb.-ft.) of torque
When installing the downpipe-to-engine mounting plates, be prepared to do a bit of wiggling to get them into place. Leave the plate with the two metal sleeves off until you have everything else in place.
The two nuts for the downpipe-side plate take 25 Nm (18-19 lb.-ft.) of torque, and the two for the lower bracket take 24 Nm (17-18 lb.-ft.) of torque.
The mounting bolt and nut for the lower (turbo-IC) charge pipe take 10 Nm (7-8 lb.-ft.) of torque


I hope this helps some people- again, please also use the FSM and directions with your BSD kit!

Now, for my initial review of the kit and its effects (I only have a few miles on it so far):
As I mentioned above, the directions suck. They could EASILY have printed up what I just typed out, along with some nice pictures, but instead you get a very vague, nearly useless sheet with a see-FSM-type instruction. Not helpful for those who don't have it! This took me about a half-hour to type up with what I would consider pretty dang good directions, complete with torque specs and socket sizes!
The BSD parts themselves are pretty straight-forward- a bolt, and a small blockoff plate with an O-ring. Simple enough.
Now, is it worth it?
Well, I was hoping for an increase in engine (compression) braking, and there is SOME, but nothing huge. The engine seems more eager to rev, as though I had done a lightened flywheel or crank pulley. Nothing huge, but a noticeable improvement. More power? Maybe. Fuel economy and durability will have to wait for a few thousand miles, but I'll post up more. So far I'm just glad nothing leaks (knock on wood!). Cheers, and enjoy! Mark W.
 

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Very nice write-up. Not sure if this is something I will do, but it's awesome to have a member give such a detailed how-to. Definitely in for a longer term road use review as that may inform if I do this or not sometime down the road.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, Magic :)

Okay, so 200 mile update. Got underneath and had to put a dab of RTV on the front crank pulley-side corner (I thought I'd gone a little lighter there- always trust your instincts! :) ), but otherwise, no issues. Topped off the oil, so now I ended up using the typical 7 quarts people are reporting for this setup.

The one thing I've noticed that's changed is that between 1,600 and 1,900 RPM's the oil pressure is slightly below the mid-line (~35 PSI, I'm assuming). It doesn't move under hard cornering, so I'm not too worried, and besides- hard cornering shouldn't be done just off idle, anyway! :)

Otherwise, I have a LONG ways to go before I can report on fuel economy (no reported drop according to the computer, but I don't go by that) or reliability. I can say that so far, there's absolutely no perceived increase in NVH (even with the CFM rear engine mount and TSB mounts otherwise), even at redline. The car pulls a bit more smoothly and quickly in the lower gears (1-3). Overall, I'd say my well-calibrated butt dyno rates this one even with a lightened crank pulley on a Subaru EJ motor- maybe 1-5 WHP. Nothing to write home about, for sure. The increase in engine (compression) braking is a nice benefit, although I'll admit I was hoping for more. For a very inexpensive mod, this might be worth it ONLY if you DIY it. If you had to pay $100+ in labor on top of parts, only if it were a track-focused car (and even then, you should be DIYing it! For shame! ;) ).

I'll keep updating as I find out more- Mark W.
 

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Mark, thanks for the excellent writeup and our apologies for the lack of details in our instructions. This product fits multiple applications and is one of the reasons for the reference to use the FSM. With your permission, we would like to include Focus ST specific instructions using information provided on your post.

Please get in touch with us to receive a credit for the purchase price of your balance shaft delete in appreciation of you taking the time to do the installation writeup.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, Hector- PM sent!

Next up, about 450 miles in, and I've noticed my oil pressure is slightly lower than before after the car warms up. Not low enough to be of any concern, but I'd be a bit more cautious about boosting under 2K RPM's in 5th or 6th, as oil pressure is lowest there (not a good time to boost anyway, but we all have lazy moments!). Otherwise, my fuel economy over a tank and a half is holding steady, if up slightly, which is a pleasant surprise. I would attribute the increase to warmer weather, though- NOT to the kit. The fact that fuel economy hasn't worsened is the pleasant surprise, to clarify :)
Otherwise, no apparent downsides to this mod- definitely no noticeable increase in NVH, so that's good- Mark W.
 

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So the question to ask you is this... Would you do it again?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
For my own car, probably. Would I recommend it for most daily drivers? Probably not. The benefits for your average DIY'er don't really outweigh the potential for screw-up-- also, if you had to pay to have this done, definitely not worth it. The gains are MINIMAL-- if you're building towards a more track-worthy car, the weight reduction and slight increase in compression braking are nice, but alone aren't worth much.
I'd look at this mod in the sense of something to do as part of a larger modification plan for a car- if you're looking for bang-for-your-buck, inexpensive mods just for the sake of keeping it cheap, I'd say it's likely not going to do much. Hopefully that made some sense as an answer- Mark W.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Another update- decided to drop the pan to check things out (yes, I'm paranoid like that!). There was a BIT of metal in the oil, but nothing major- the engine only has 11,100 miles on it, so it's still breaking in. The BSD plug was still FIRMLY stuck in the hole.

In taking it apart, I found that you don't HAVE TO remove the rear/lower engine mount. It makes it easier to remove the A/C compressor if you do, but you can still remove it and do everything necessary without removing the mount.

Also, to confirm- the BSD plug bolt DOES take an M8 (8mm) Allen socket. I'll update the OP, but so far, so good! Time to go spend another hour or two with RTV and a scraper! Yee haw? Mark W.
 

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Noob question here -- why is the balance shaft there in the first place then?
In noob terms, it balances the rotating mass of the crank shaft. Considering the NVH and longevity of bottom end components should not be taken lightly when considering this mod. As the OP said, for the DD, this mod is not recommended.
 

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In noob terms, it balances the rotating mass of the crank shaft. Considering the NVH and longevity of bottom end components should not be taken lightly when considering this mod. As the OP said, for the DD, this mod is not recommended.
Wrong. The crank is already balanced, the balance shaft is spun by a balanced gear. It slows down the crank and may reduce some NVH.

I've run one for about a year and a half without issue. No perceived increase in NVH besides on decel. As long as you get your silicone beaded on the pan well, you'll have no issues.
 

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Wrong. The crank is already balanced, the balance shaft is spun by a balanced gear. It slows down the crank and may reduce some NVH.

I've run one for about a year and a half without issue. No perceived increase in NVH besides on decel. As long as you get your silicone beaded on the pan well, you'll have no issues.
Yes, but I was trying to keep it simple, and what I said is not wrong.
 

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Yes, but I was trying to keep it simple, and what I said is not wrong.

Well, you're stating the mechanical function of the balance shaft assembly is to balance the crank. Which it does not.

To also say it effects the longevity of the motor is also highly questionable. Ford makes many duratec engines without a balance shaft assembly. Typically they just vibrate a little more.
 

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Just want to add my experience I’m here for anyone that is looking to do this. I have a 2015 ST and my oil pan only had 2 sets of baffles... So I was “missing” the upper one from the factory. That being said you can either tap your own bolt holes or have a machine shop do it. Up to you. Additionally had to order some new oil baffle bolts. Just wanted to give someone a heads up for the possibility so you’re not completely caught off guard! Hope all goes well with your install.
 

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An inline 4 cylinder has poor second order balance (imbalances that occur twice per crankshaft rotation). The balance shaft is there to counter those forces, it is not merely a NVH thing, it's a durability thing. Counterweighting of the crankshaft has no bearing (pun intended) on secondary forces. The imbalanced forces increase at the square of engine speed, so countering this is especially important for running high rpm.
 
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