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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The purpose of this thread is to give new members or people just now working on their cars a chance to discuss and learn about a big turbo build in real time, rather than simply being ignored, or told to go read through hundreds of pages of 3-year-old threads. My long term goal with the car is to safely max out the GTX2867r in the ballpark of ~440whp. My goal with this thread is to be active and stay on top of people's questions so that everyone gets the information they need, when they need it. Hopefully this thread can be as useful to you guys as those threads that allowed me to learn everything I needed to properly build a deceptively powerful car.

Now, to business. In chronological order:

Pre-Thread build...
June 2013: Car purchased
May 2014: cp-e Intake | DP | CBE | stg 2 RMM --- Steeda OTS 94 pump gas tune
May 2015: 19"x8.5" TSW Nurburgring (Gunmetal)

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Grim Sleeper build Thread...
April 2016:
Garrett ATP GTX2867r
cp-e FMIC | Hot Pipe | Cold Pipe | Tial Q BOV
Boomba Stg 2 Catch Can | Short Throw Shifter | Shifter Bushings | Transmission Cable Bushings
COBB AP V3 - STRATIFIED Custom
WMI

Summer 2017
- Suspension and chassis trinkets
- HP+ and DTC-60 Brake pads

Summer 2018
- Mountune Radiator
- Weight reduction
- Boostane/Race Gas mix tune
- Michelin PS4S
- VelossaTech Brake Ducting

Summer 2019
- AP Racing BBK & Rear Frankenbrake with DTC-60 pads and DBA slotted rotors
- Castrol SRF brake fluid
- Replace damaged turbo to hot pipe hose

NEED LSD..

Pics of the build parts coming next.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
The first thing that got built was 5 high quality wooden cribb blocks to use as tire stands. I took one to a local load testing facility and had them destroyed, and the load was recorded up to failure of the first support beam.

The block held over 26,000lbs before a single 2x4 fractured. The 2013 Ford Focus is supported by 4 of these, and weighs ~3200 lbs.

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
First the car was torn apart:

I'm going to try to post pictures that aren't already posted in several other threads. Hopefully this minimizes page count from clutter and repetition.

There are tutorial threads and videos of each of these, just ask and I will reference them.

1. Remove underside cover
2. Remove bumper
3. Remove Active Grill Shutter (does not go back into car once cp-e FMIC is installed)
4. Remove intake and airbox
5. Remove Intercooler
6. Remove hot pipe and cold pipe
7. Label boost controller hoses and remove boost controller
8. Remove stock turbo
9. Remove stock shifter (requires removal of center console)

Using labelled ziplock bags or tupperwares is a must for a scope of work like this. Many nuts and bolts come off, some go back on, some don't, try to keep track and follow the instructions from the parts (online for Boomba.. cp-e ships the instructions).

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The hard hoses from the boost controller were a mess so I ended up replacing each of them with 7/32" ID hose (be careful which OD you choose or your hose clamps won't quite bite hard enough, either way try to recondition your hose clamps so that they bite like they did initially, or buy new ones.) I capped off the motor-top solenoid nipple for the BPV hose, which initially went from the solenoid atop the engine, down into the nipple on the BPV which is integrated into the stock turbo. The GTX2867r has an integrated wastegate, but does not have an integrated BPV, which is why in this build a Tial Q BOV is installed in the cp-e cold pipe (super convenient).

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
This shows the capped off BPV nipple on the motor-top solenoid. Picture is out of focus, but you can see the cap on the bottom right hand side of the solenoid.

Some people have used this as their vacuum source for their BOV, but I chose to use the cp-e Symposer Delete plate with vacuum source nipple. Super simple install, takes 5 minutes to uninstall the sound symposer, and even less to bolt on the block plate. *I was slightly disappointed that the nipple that came with the block plate was undersized in the OD, it was a 3/16" nipple at the fat rim, and even smaller in nipple OD, where the ID of the hoses all over the boost controller and solenoids are 7/32" ID. I had to purchase some smaller ID tubing, 5/32" ID or smaller for a tight fit, then spliced that to the 7/32" ID hose (this required a smaller hose clamp so I bought a very small worm clamp)

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
In the process of removing the stock turbo, you will definitely want to drain your coolant, and changing your oil and filter at the same time is a good idea. I simply drained the coolant and refilled using Ford's prediluted orange coolant. You do not want to mix different types or colors of coolants, nor do you want to over-concentrate your coolant by draining a diluted mixture and refilling with a concentrated coolant. Keep in mind that when you drain your coolant from your radiator (not to be confused with a flush), you will likely get 40-50% of the total coolant volume out of the system, the remainder is in the heater block and hoses/lines. This means that you only need roughly 3 quarts or so if you are simply draining the rad and refilling, vs roughly 6 quarts if you have done a full flush (plenty of videos on youtube, join the never-ending debate about distilled vs garden hose water if you're into that).

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As for the oil, I used Mobil 1 5W30 Synthetic, and M1-209 filter. Draining the oil is fairly straight forward, look for Jason Georgievsky's videos, he's a legend. Just make sure that you lubricate the seal of the new filter, and try not to over-torque the drain plug, otherwise you'll risk stripping the threads or worse on aluminum block.

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Lastly, the shifter and transmission cable linkages/housings/brackets were removed. This ended up being the first thing that went onto the car, very straightforward, videos on youtube for both by the legendary Jason Georgievsky (is he a focusst.org member? no idea).

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Next was the turbo. There is quite alot to this compared to the rest of these parts that got installed last weekend. I would recommend the 27 minute long youtube video posted by PonyParts (Spool Tuning). Excellent walkthrough of everything from removing the underside to routing the controller hoses, to bolting on the turbo and its hoses. There are essentially 4 hoses: Coolant supply and return, oil supply and return. Some people have had trouble getting the coolant return hose off from the driver side of the engine, beneath the HPFP, but it's really not as bad as it sounds. I used the high quality silicone hose supplied by ATP and had no trouble, luckily.

*You will be re-using the stock oil drain line (the short hard line), and the stock turbo/DP V-band clamp (this can be seized up, soak with Liquid Wrench).

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Things to look out for:

1. BE CAREFUL NOT TO OVER-TORQUE YOUR FITTINGS, ESPECIALLY THOSE THREADED INTO YOUR ALUMINUM BLOCK. It's much easier to tighten after the fact to solve a small coolant or oil leak than it is to solve a cracked block or stripped threads. For this reason, once you are done, I would recommend driving around without re-installing the underside cover for a week or so, so that you can monitor the car for leaks. Try to park in a dry parking spot (once you start monitoring for leaks you'll notice that nearly every parking space in the world is covered in fluid leaks), and check it when you next pull out of it. Of course, immediately after the install you'll want to idle the car for 20-30 minutes and monitor for leaks before you even lower the car down to the ground.

2. You may want to put some form of heat protection (I used DEI 3/4" sheathing fastened with a few zip ties) on your lines or the turbo itself, as the turbine side (exhaust side) is very hot, and is quite insulated in the back of the engine where it is. The boost controller will likely end up very nearby aswell. Lots of clutter and heat and rubbing is a recipe for a headache down the road. I used some heat sheating for the turbo lines, because they cross right over the turbine. The heat protection debate is endless and both sides have armies that are thousands strong and full of "experts". Do some research, do what you choose is best for you. Drink Pepsi, or drink Coke, it's your car.

3. PRIMING YOUR TURBO WITH FLUIDS - We are lucky, on our car, this is very straight forward. Once you are all bolted on and ready to fire it up and slam the throttle to record a gnarley video for your friends on Facebook.... DON'T... Your turbo is completely dry (relatively speaking), and NEEDS to be primed with coolant and oil BEFORE you get all horny to start filming the Fast and Furious 17.5. To do this, simply take a deep breath, sit in your cockpit, press in the clutch AND the gas pedal all the way to the floor, then press the START/STOP button, and your engine will turnover without fuel injection. Do this for about 10-20 seconds, then press the START/STOP button to quit, and release the pedals.

Stratified Automotive has some great info and tutorials on their website, I would highly recommend checking it out (go to the website, look for reading material, read said material, you will not regret learning from it). In particular, they have a guide for a cylinder compression test, which also requires the cranking of your engine without fuel injection, so you can get your step by step guide there.

4. Double check your boost controller hose routing/plumbing. Incorrect controller plumbing can result in strange behavior from the engine when you try to boost, double check it to be sure it's correct.

This is a poor image, but it's sourced from an excellent How-To by EdgeAutosports here in the forums, just search google for it (fantastic customer service, Alan and Marlin were super helpful when it came time to put in the order).

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5. Double check your turbo line and boost controller hose routing to ensure that you are not dangling any lines/holes directly on a hot surface, or pinched between tight surfaces. Damage to these lines will undoubtedly take you out of commission quickly and cause a real headache. Zip ties are an easy way to fasten your lines/hoses out of harms way. I replaced each hose from the boost controller with new, longer hoses so that there was no interference between all of the tightly held components back in that passenger side corner where the turbo and controller are.

6. Do not use the stock turbo gasket at the exhaust headifold (it tends to hang back on the studs), make sure you have your fire ring in place (our cars don't really have an exhaust manifold, we are referencing where the four studs are that your secure the turbo onto the engine block with 4 nuts)

7. Tighten your turbo hose fittings in a way so that the 90* and 45* fittings end up pointing away in a safe direction, and aren't twisted up as a result.

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
DEI Heat Sheathing (Too much data stored in previous post, couldn't attach this file above)

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The piping, BOV, symposer delete plate and FMIC were up next. The passenger side of the radiator support hanger was unbolted and I drilled out the rivet, this made fitting the FMIC into place with the installed brackets super simple. When done, the two bolts were put back into the rad support, the rivet is casualty #1. See PonyParts' (Spool Tuning) videos for intercooler installs on youtube, in one of them they show how to release the passenger side of the rad support.

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As you can imagine, and as you are likely to have read in 10 different places online, the cp-e FMIC is enormous, and it's totally worth it. In each of my first 20 or so WOT datalogs I saw nothing higher than a 2* or 3* difference between charge temp and ambient. Unreal. For an air to air heat exchanger it's impressive, it does exactly what you need it to. Props to the gang at cp-e. Because I fit it with both hot and cold pipes from cp-e, there were absolutely no fitment issues whatsoever, although if you have piping from other vendors, you may end up doing some minor McGivery in cutting and fitting elbows to get it right. This isn't an issue, so don't shy away from this FMIC for that reason, it's quite easy to hack off an inch or a bend and buy a silicone elbow and some v-band or worm clamps at the auto parts store. The cp-e piping comes with high quality clamps to replace the stock worm clamps, which are known to blow off under high boost.

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I was anticipating the BOV to come with cp-e's yellow custom spring with the Exhale kit, so I ordered the plain spring from Edge, only to find out that the spring inside is also plain... Haven't received a response from Edge yet about this, although for $28 for the extra spring I'm not too rattled about it. I changed the springs anyway, because that way I know I put a 10psi spring inside, where I have no idea if the initial spring was actually 10psi, or if it was a "cp-e custom yellow" spring that they stopped painting... Anyone?
 

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Subbed, look forward to more awesomeness. I really like the load test you did, definitely make some now.

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Getting the piping onto turbo and manifold is no issue, just make sure you orient your clamps in a way that you'll be able to reach them and fasten them once you've test fitted everything together.

I would strongly recommend installing the BOV BEFORE you install the cold pipe. Some guys have had real issues trying to fit the BOV on afterwards. With the cp-e gear, it's totally a tight fit, but there is no rubbing. I have seen some installs where the vacuum nipple on the top of the BOV is rubbing hard against the A/C compressor. This would be a huge red flag for me because my car has plenty of vibration at low rpm, and even more at high rpm and this could lead to some hassle down the road if left unchecked.

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With the intercooler and piping/BOV installed, that wrapped up this phase of the build. Here are some things I haven't yet mentioned that could be helpful:

1. I replaced the downpipe to CBE gasket with a new one from cp-e, which I would recommend (had an extra one from the DP/CBE install in 2014).
2. Because it had been a couple of years since the exhaust went on, the bolts there and certainly the four nuts holding the turbo to the exhaust headifold were quite seized up, so I was quite glad that I soaked them in Liquid Wrench for a few minutes before attempting to remove them. The last thing you want is to snap a bolt, stud, or seize up a nut, 100% chance that'll make for a long day if not a long month/year.
3. Be patient with this stuff, do it once, do it right.

Now, the guys at Stratified hooked me up with a BT base tune to get me driving last minute (on a saturday or sunday no less, hugely bailed me out because all I had at the time was COBB OTS 93 Stage 3 tune).

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Will add reviews of these parts and the custom tuning process, along with planned tweaks to fix some rubbing of the intake with the HPFP, and pics of the 2014 build parts in a couple hours. Stand by.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Pics of the intake, DP, CBE, RMM:

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Reviews:

RMM - Completely eliminates wheel hop, even with BT.
CBE - Loud but deep rumble, gargling noise at low rpm, absolutely not cheap fart can sound. Drone on highway at 3000rpm+ definitely noticeable. You NEED to delete your symposer or it is unbearably loud in the cabin.
DP - Catless - Great sound, noticeably reduced backpressure on turbo, a must have for a BT build (3" pipe).
Intake - Allows sound of turbo spool and BOV/BPV to become much more audible, love it.
Wheels - Stock bolt pattern 5x108 so no adapter needed, has small spacers for wheel hub fit. Good look on this car.

New parts reviews next.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
1st drive, 1st thoughts:

1. Turbo - As many people have stated, this turbo is night and day from the stock turbo, even with the most conservative first iteration of the custom tune from Stratified (shout out to Alex, Bugasu, and HemiCouple).
2. Short Throw - More vibration due to a couple of things: Replaced 7 dampers with metal bushings, intake is not ideal fit with BT silicone elbows (more to come on this in the next week or two). Shifter itself is excellent.
3. Intercooler - Performs better than expected, so far haven't seen charge temps any hotter than 2-3* above ambient in any of my logs.
4. BOV - Unreal sound, super aggressive discharge from high boost, pleasant flutter dumping moderate boost.
5. COBB AP - Must have. (Had SCT X3 in 2014,was not nearly as user-friendly as the AP)
6. * Stratified Custom Tune * - More on this to come... Initial experience is excellent with these guys, super knowledgeable and enthusiastic. I annoy the **** out of them and they haven't hung up on me yet. Again, check out their website, not for the products (I'm not into marketing), for the INFO, they have TONS of excellent reading material that is both very technically in-depth and easy to read.

Datalogs, and videos of the BOV and WOT pulls to come. Stay tuned.

Work to be done:

1. Boomba Stage 2 Catch Can Install (next week) - Excellent How-To vids on youtube - Many people have shown pictures of dirty oil catch cans in just a short amount of run time, as well as dirty manifolds and valves. This is also another heated debate, as I've heard from very experienced mechanics that this is nothing to worry about and is totally normal, but then you have to ask "Do I really want this oil going into my manifold?". The reason I will install one is that with higher boost I expect more oil blowby into the crank case, increasing the likelihood that this oil makes its way back into my combustion chamber, increasing the rate at which my valves gum up. Again, drink Coke, drink Pepsi, it's your car.

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2. Reposition Intake - I'm going to trim the 90* elbow that mates the intake to the compressor inlet to shift the intake about 0.5" toward the driver side of the car. Depending on how this goes, I may use a small extension in the top side of that elbow to raise the intake 0.5" or 1". It's so tight that I had to run the vacuum line from the top of the engine down to the boost controller over top of the intake. Also those plastic funnels that run from the snorkel on the bumper into the cp-e airbox are a mess so I will likely replace them with more flexible silicone hoses, we'll see.

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3. Compression Test (early May)- I want to know how my piston seals are holding up now so that I can compare their health in the future. Stratified has a stellar write up on this on their website. I bought my tester for maybe $30-40 USD. Seems like the biggest challenge will be to set the tester nipple into the spark plug holes because they are receded down into the engine block quite a bit from the top where the coil packs sit. More write up on this when I get there.

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Discussion Starter #14
COBB AP - Stratified Custom Tune Discussion:

The COBB AP got routed into the OBDII port by undoing the two clips on the white harness just inside the OBDII door under the steering wheel, plugging the AP into that white harness, then pushing that assembled harness and extra cable length up into the OBDII door so that it is hidden, and just enough sticks out to reach the AP up on the dashboard.

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I picked up a magnetic mount from WalMart for $20 USD.

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This is what I've been monitoring actively, and the start-up screen from cp-e.

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--- Datalog Discussion ---

I typically run 94 octane pump gas (10% ethanol blend), though on the advice of some I gave it a shot with a tank of ethanol-free 91 octane pump gas for the first drive with the new custom BT tune. The first iteration (V1.00) of the custom tune came with two slots, one was a low boost safe-tune that was used as a diagnostic tool before we ramped up to the other slot which is the real 1st iteration of the big turbo custom tune.

First thoughts from monitoring and datalogging on 91 pump gas (ethanol-free) with V1.00 during WOT 3rd gear pulls:

1. Turbo spools up to 23psi by 3200rpm, and holds nearly flat through to redline @ 6500rpm.
2. Some knocking causing timing pulls of about 3.5 on cyl 1 and less on the other cyls. --> [email protected] recommended trying a tank of 94 pump gas and comparing initial results before we move forward with 5 or 6 iterations of the custom tune. ***The next set of logs will be on 94 pump gas, V1.00, and will take place sometime this week***
3. Peak boost reached 25.17psi, but typically sits around peak of 23.5psi @ 5500-6000 rpm
4. 1st, 2nd, 3rd gear shred the tires, 4th will bite.

More to come this week with the 94 logs.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Did some cutting on the cai tube i see.
Actually I did this install at my buddy's place, and he didn't have a Dremel or a hacksaw or a grinder so we drilled it off at 3am after a beer or 10 just to get it into the car. Super tight fit, definitely the biggest headache of this entire build. I'm going to grind that off when I reposition the intake next weekend.
 

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Actually I did this install at my buddy's place, and he didn't have a Dremel or a hacksaw or a grinder so we drilled it off at 3am after a beer or 10 just to get it into the car. Super tight fit, definitely the biggest headache of this entire build. I'm going to grind that off when I reposition the intake next weekend.
This is why I love backyard builds, always a hoot.
 

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The first iteration (V1.00) of the custom tune came with two slots, one was a low boost safe-tune that was used as a diagnostic tool before we ramped up to the other slot which is the real 1st iteration of the big turbo custom tune.

First thoughts from monitoring and datalogging on 91 pump gas (ethanol-free) with V1.00 during WOT 3rd gear pulls:

1. Turbo spools up to 23psi by 3200rpm, and holds nearly flat through to redline @ 6500rpm.
2. Some knocking causing timing pulls of about 3.5 on cyl 1 and less on the other cyls. --> [email protected] recommended trying a tank of 94 pump gas and comparing initial results before we move forward with 5 or 6 iterations of the custom tune. ***The next set of logs will be on 94 pump gas, V1.00, and will take place sometime this week***
3. Peak boost reached 25.17psi, but typically sits around peak of 23.5psi @ 5500-6000 rpm
4. 1st, 2nd, 3rd gear shred the tires, 4th will bite.

More to come this week with the 94 logs.

seems like a lot of boost for the first iteration, you are lucky to have 94 octane available locally, not very common in the US at least
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
seems like a lot of boost for the first iteration, you are lucky to have 94 octane available locally, not very common in the US at least
Here is a small chart with timing corrections and boost pressure vs engine rpm. You can clearly see that the car (on 91 pump gas) isn't bothered much to sustain 23psi from 3450rpm through to redline in cyls 2, 3, and 4... Cyl 1 is just a muff.
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I'll be doing a compression test within a week or so to take a closer look at cyl 1 compared to the others. At that time I'll re-gap my spark plugs, unless by some miracle I find Denso's or NGK's in Canada in the next week. I'd like to go one step colder.

Also, plenty of power left on the table in terms of WG actuation. See below chart of WGDC and Boost Pressure vs RPM.

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Discussion Starter #20
How it's positioned now, the cp-e intake runs over top of cyl 4's coil pack, so it's got to come off to change the plugs and test compression. Where the intake has to re-positioned and have what's left of the support bracket ground off, I'm going to hold off until the weekend and get this all done in one shot.

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This is a super cheap gauge ($2-$3) that you can use to regap your plugs. Mine initially came from the factory gapped at 0.043", and I re-gapped them to 0.027". This is not difficult to do, you simply find a hard surface and press or tap the ground strap onto it and keep measuring your gap until it's down to whatever you have chosen for you car. Just be careful with the iridium tip, it's super brittle. I have heard read claims that you should never attempt to re-gap iridium plugs for this reason, and NGK USA mentions in a youtube video that you should never re-gap more than +/- 0.008". MANY people have re-gapped below 0.030" without issue here, so I would tend to agree with the consensus, and their experience running the plugs on our car.

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Stratified recommends 0.025-0.026", and the consensus between everyone else is roughly 0.028-0.030". The Stratified guys have a good write up in their Technical Articles about spark plugs and the effect of large or small gaps. I went with 0.027" for now, and will monitor performance. A larger gap may be needed for winter driving when that comes back around.

Tuning

Filled up with 94 pump gas today (done with 91 for now), so hoping to see more promising timing corrections in the next week or so. The corrections in cyl 1 are bothering me, not that they're excessive, but that they're consistently 3x or 4x worse than the corrections on the other 3 cylinders. It could easily be a spark plug or coil pack issue, so I'm hoping to find out more next weekend when I pull the stock plugs. I am anticipating timing corrections to initially improve, but that will be attributed to the higher octane of the 94 blend. If cyl 1 persists with deeper negative corrections than the other cylinders even with new colder plugs, then I will be switching the coil pack from cyl 1 to another cylinder, to see if I can isolate the problem. There are all kinds of things that can cause one cylinder to act up and pull more timing than the others, mainly deposits on the piston (change the volume and landscape of the combustion chamber), sharp edges left from machining the piston, or oil making its way through the valve guides and fouling up the spark plug.

More on this next weekend.
 
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