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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello, I wanted my intercooler exposed at all time, for maximum air flow. I just have the stock intercooler at the moment. 131.jpg
Its as simple as that, pull the number f35 fuse, the fuse should have the number "5" on it, do not get it confused with the other fuse above it, as it is also numbered as "5".
Make sure your shutters are OPEN when you pull the fuse, Start car, turn AC on, wait for shutters to open, check with flashlight to see if shutters are open, if so, then turn off car, and proceed to pull the fuse.

I have circled were the fuse should be pulled in pink.
Enjoy your truly functional intercooler guys!
 

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So, why not remove the shutters, too? That'll have a much more useful effect- 0% chance of them blocking any airflow if they're at home in the garage! Plus a few pounds off the nose- win all around :) Mark W.
 

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IMHO this is a useless mod. Since you are not putting in more efficient intercooler, you are only increasing your drag coefficient, ie wasting more fuel, making car take longer to warm up, etc.
Mine takes no longer to warm up.
No impact to fuel economy.
Why drive around with an already overly warm intercooler. This does not replace a good after market cooler, but for someone that can't afford one or just doesn't want one , this is a helpful option.

Jim

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Rwmoving the AGS fuse-Many people have done this including me...battery light comes on sometimes...NBD. In the summer I've notes oil temps stay a little cooler and power remains a lottle more consistent when repeatedly gunning it. Since its started getting cold I haven't noticed any ill effects. May take a little longer to warm u but this car runs so warm and warms up quickly, I don't see it as any problem.
 

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Rwmoving the AGS fuse-Many people have done this including me...battery light comes on sometimes...NBD. In the summer I've notes oil temps stay a little cooler and power remains a lottle more consistent when repeatedly gunning it. Since its started getting cold I haven't noticed any ill effects. May take a little longer to warm u but this car runs so warm and warms up quickly, I don't see it as any problem.
Actually monitoring the temperatures in test mode or with a scan tool would tell you that the dummy gauge is lying to you, the car doesn't warm up all that quickly even with the grille shutters as the oil temperature gauge doesn't warm up much beyond the bottom peg for the first 5 or so miles driven around town in sub freezing temperatures, sure there might be a little bit of heat rejection from the radiator, but to say it was up to temperature quickly is a bit of a misnomer. At that time the shutters were virtually fully closed and it still didn't warm up when driving normally. The time before when beating on it a tiny bit more it might have just gotten off the bottom peg on the oil temperature gauge (120F) and maybe was around 50C or so in terms of coolant temperatures, no where near the 90-97C it would normally run when warmed up such as after a good long freeway run.
 

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IMHO this is a useless mod. Since you are not putting in more efficient intercooler, you are only increasing your drag coefficient, ie wasting more fuel, making car take longer to warm up, etc.
Mine are tuned to stay open all the time via FSWerks and the car is more consistent. Not taking more fuel. Not longer to warm up. People telling you otherwise are BS'ing you.

P.S. Last week I averaged 6.6 L/100km or 35.6 MPG with the shutters always opened via performance Calibration.
 

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If you put an aftermarket intercooler on it, you have to remove the entire shutter system, right?

How are people handling that? If you bought say a COBB stage kit with the IC in it, how do THEY deactivate the shutters? Via the AP?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
This is just a free fun thing to do, obviously an aftermarket cooler will be better duh. And you dont have to remove the bumper and spend alot of time to do it, removing the shutters is alot more work.
 

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^ Obviously, but to get maximum benefit from this, that'd be the way to go. Especially if you don't live in an area, like Houston, where it's not cold enough long enough for warm-up to be an issue like it is up here in the snow states- Mark W.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Exactly!
^ Obviously, but to get maximum benefit from this, that'd be the way to go. Especially if you don't live in an area, like Houston, where it's not cold enough long enough for warm-up to be an issue like it is up here in the snow states- Mark W.
 

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Here we go again...

There's a whole big wonderful world out there kids. A 'Gallon' isn't always your gallon:

The imperial gallon
The imperial (UK) gallon, defined as exactly 4.54609 litres, is used in some Commonwealth countries and was originally based on the volume of 10 pounds (approximately 4.54 kg) of water at 62 °F (17 °C). (A US liquid gallon of water weighs about 8.34 pounds or 3.78 kilograms at the same temperature.) The imperial fluid ounce is defined as 1⁄160 of an imperial gallon. There are four quarts in a gallon, two pints in a quart, and 20 fluid ounces in a pint.

The US liquid gallon
The US gallon, which is equal to 3.785411784 litres is legally defined as 231 cubic inches.[1][2] There are four quarts in a gallon, two pints in a quart and 16 fluid ounces in a pint. In order to overcome the effects of expansion and contraction with temperature when using a gallon to specify a quantity of material for purposes of trade, it is common to define the temperature at which the material will occupy the specified volume. For example, for purposes of trade, the volume of petroleum products[3] and alcoholic beverages[4] are both referenced to 60 °F (16 °C)

---------------------


Mathemagics portion:

4.546 ImpGal / 3.785 USGal = 1.201 ratio

Therefore:

35mpg @ Imperial Gallons to USGallons = 35 / 1.201 = 29.14 mpg (mpUSg)
 

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Here we go again...

There's a whole big wonderful world out there kids. A 'Gallon' isn't always your gallon:

The imperial gallon
The imperial (UK) gallon, defined as exactly 4.54609 litres, is used in some Commonwealth countries and was originally based on the volume of 10 pounds (approximately 4.54 kg) of water at 62 °F (17 °C). (A US liquid gallon of water weighs about 8.34 pounds or 3.78 kilograms at the same temperature.) The imperial fluid ounce is defined as 1⁄160 of an imperial gallon. There are four quarts in a gallon, two pints in a quart, and 20 fluid ounces in a pint.

The US liquid gallon
The US gallon, which is equal to 3.785411784 litres is legally defined as 231 cubic inches.[1][2] There are four quarts in a gallon, two pints in a quart and 16 fluid ounces in a pint. In order to overcome the effects of expansion and contraction with temperature when using a gallon to specify a quantity of material for purposes of trade, it is common to define the temperature at which the material will occupy the specified volume. For example, for purposes of trade, the volume of petroleum products[3] and alcoholic beverages[4] are both referenced to 60 °F (16 °C)

---------------------


Mathemagics portion:

4.546 ImpGal / 3.785 USGal = 1.201 ratio

Therefore:

35mpg @ Imperial Gallons to USGallons = 35 / 1.201 = 29.14 mpg (mpUSg)
I wasn't trying to be a ****. Lol. Clearly, I was wrong. My bad.


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Here we go again...

There's a whole big wonderful world out there kids. A 'Gallon' isn't always your gallon:

The imperial gallon
The imperial (UK) gallon, defined as exactly 4.54609 litres, is used in some Commonwealth countries and was originally based on the volume of 10 pounds (approximately 4.54 kg) of water at 62 °F (17 °C). (A US liquid gallon of water weighs about 8.34 pounds or 3.78 kilograms at the same temperature.) The imperial fluid ounce is defined as 1⁄160 of an imperial gallon. There are four quarts in a gallon, two pints in a quart, and 20 fluid ounces in a pint.

The US liquid gallon
The US gallon, which is equal to 3.785411784 litres is legally defined as 231 cubic inches.[1][2] There are four quarts in a gallon, two pints in a quart and 16 fluid ounces in a pint. In order to overcome the effects of expansion and contraction with temperature when using a gallon to specify a quantity of material for purposes of trade, it is common to define the temperature at which the material will occupy the specified volume. For example, for purposes of trade, the volume of petroleum products[3] and alcoholic beverages[4] are both referenced to 60 °F (16 °C)

---------------------

Mathemagics portion:

4.546 ImpGal / 3.785 USGal = 1.201 ratio

Therefore:

35mpg @ Imperial Gallons to USGallons = 35 / 1.201 = 29.14 mpg (mpUSg)
He said 6.6 l/100 km. That's 15.151 KPL, multiply by 0.621 = 9.409 MPL, multiply by 3.785 = 35.613 MPG.
 

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Registered
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2,659 Posts
Here we go again...

There's a whole big wonderful world out there kids. A 'Gallon' isn't always your gallon:

The imperial gallon
The imperial (UK) gallon, defined as exactly 4.54609 litres, is used in some Commonwealth countries and was originally based on the volume of 10 pounds (approximately 4.54 kg) of water at 62 °F (17 °C). (A US liquid gallon of water weighs about 8.34 pounds or 3.78 kilograms at the same temperature.) The imperial fluid ounce is defined as 1⁄160 of an imperial gallon. There are four quarts in a gallon, two pints in a quart, and 20 fluid ounces in a pint.

The US liquid gallon
The US gallon, which is equal to 3.785411784 litres is legally defined as 231 cubic inches.[1][2] There are four quarts in a gallon, two pints in a quart and 16 fluid ounces in a pint. In order to overcome the effects of expansion and contraction with temperature when using a gallon to specify a quantity of material for purposes of trade, it is common to define the temperature at which the material will occupy the specified volume. For example, for purposes of trade, the volume of petroleum products[3] and alcoholic beverages[4] are both referenced to 60 °F (16 °C)

---------------------


Mathemagics portion:

4.546 ImpGal / 3.785 USGal = 1.201 ratio

Therefore:

35mpg @ Imperial Gallons to USGallons = 35 / 1.201 = 29.14 mpg (mpUSg)
You wasted your time writing that down, it was 35.6 MPG US.
 
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